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View Full Version : Youngest age to get a Puppy?



sinecurea
31st August 2006, 04:55 PM
Hi Folks,
I'm looking to get a puppy from a breeder, and was just wondering - what would be the youngest age you could get a puppy from a breeder at? I'd like to bring it home pretty much as soon as it's able to be seperated from it's mother. I've seen photos here of dogs being brought home at about a month old. Is that about right?

Cheers,
Steve.

brid kenny
31st August 2006, 05:03 PM
Puppies should be at least 8 weeks before they go. This is very important for their development and if gone from litter too early it affects their behaviour with human family.

WoodHaven
31st August 2006, 05:10 PM
Hi Folks,
I'm looking to get a puppy from a breeder, and was just wondering - what would be the youngest age you could get a puppy from a breeder at? I'd like to bring it home pretty much as soon as it's able to be seperated from it's mother. I've seen photos here of dogs being brought home at about a month old. Is that about right?

Cheers,
Steve.

Curious minds would like to know WHY??
I belong to two clubs that require breeder to keep pups a MINIMUM of 8 weeks. 10-12 weeks is preferred. Why would anyone want to deal with a weaning pup? A pup that hasn't learned any dog or house manners. A pup that still HAS to at least urinate every hour or two? At a month - some of my pups are still nursing.

sinecurea
31st August 2006, 05:24 PM
Well, with house manners and stuff like that - I'd like to get the puppy started into learning where to go to the toilet at etc before it gets too acustomed to the breeder's "way", if you know what I mean?
We did that with my previous dog, and we *never* had any problems with her, she would always wait until we let her out, and came and asked if she really needed out.

Steve.

WoodHaven
31st August 2006, 05:36 PM
Well, with house manners and stuff like that - I'd like to get the puppy started into learning where to go to the toilet at etc before it gets too acustomed to the breeder's "way", if you know what I mean?
We did that with my previous dog, and we *never* had any problems with her, she would always wait until we let her out, and came and asked if she really needed out.

Steve.

I guess I don't know what you mean-- My pups go outside to eliminate- they start housetraining between 5-8 weeks of age (weather can be an issue here). I know other breeders who litter box train pups-- this is great for the urban dog.
Cavaliers can be rather slow to mature- the earliest I've place a pup was 12 weeks -- she was almost 100% housetrained. Sandy

GudrunTheRed
31st August 2006, 05:57 PM
I would not recommend getting a Cavalier that was any younger than 10-12 weeks. Any breeder that would offer a pup under 8 weeks is in my opinion a lousy breeder and very irresponsible. I also recommend you read this forum and do more research on Cavaliers before you decide to bring one home. They are very special little dogs and you should really know as much as you can about the breed before bringing one home.

Good luck!

Karlin
31st August 2006, 06:11 PM
Hi Steve:

I think you are just confused on ages, if it was a while back when you had your last dog. :) Two months would be the minimum -- indeed even the difference between homing at seven weeks, which some people will do, and eight weeks, can mean the difference between a poorly socialised, problem puppy that doesn't have much self control (learned from mom and siblings), to a puppy that is on its way to be being a well adjusted dog. The mother gives a lot of behavioural guidance to a puppy between 5-8 weeks in particular and thus taking on a puppy earlier than 8 weeks is risky (and no responsible breeder would consider homing a puppy before then anyway).

I'm quite sure you wouldn't have had a puppy at four weeks -- at that age, they are usually still feeding off the mother and only just learning to eat solid food -- a month old puppy on its own would be an emergency rescue case!

Cavaliers bond so well with people and respond so well to positive, rewards based training that a few weeks either way in age (over 8 weeks up to 12 weeks) is not going to make much difference in how the dog bonds to you or its willingness to learn. Indeed most reputable breeders generally will not consider homing cavaliers until between 10-12 weeks as they are so small -- AND because it is actually EASIER to housetrain them once they are slightly bigger and easier for most people to manage a slightly older puppy. They are so small as puppies that they can easily squat and go in carpets etc without anyone seeing and every mistake like that is a step back in housetraining. Those few weeks extra over 8 weeks with the breeder mean you don't need to be taking the puppy out every single hour as you will need to with an 8 wk old. It is a much, much easier task with a 10-12 week pup. Also a good breeder will have helped the puppy start to learn housetraining, not teach it poor habits! So that will get you off to a good start. Any breeder who isn;t starting the puppy off with housetraining in a very positive and beneficial way for the new owner would be questionable, too.

Be sure to research breeders very, very carefully. There are health issues that can affect lifespan and quality of life in the breed and a good breeder's breeding programme will be designed to work for longevity and good health. There are lots of links in the Library section of this site with advice on finding a good breeder. For me, a breeder willing to home before 8 weeks would raise red flags.

Nisha
1st September 2006, 09:08 AM
oh no way. i would defintely not recommend you gettin a dog till after it is 8 weeks old. the first 8 weeks are crucial to the life long worldview, or perspective, of a puppy..... This is also their socialization period. The puppy learns social interaction with his littermates, learns how to play and learns bite inhibition A puppy that is taken too early can have behavioral problems later because he never learned these early social skills. He'll also learn discipline at this point the mother will begin weaning the pups around this time, and will start teaching them basic manners, including accepting her as the leader of the pack.

anyway, good luck :flwr:

Maxxs_Mummy
1st September 2006, 10:57 AM
I did PM you last night but tbh I too think you need to research this a lot more thoroughly.

I agree with Gudrun, they are very special little dogs indeed. Probably THE most special dogs in the world :)

My eldest was 13 weeks when we brought him home. Almost completely housetrained (except for a few accidents until he realised where the door was). We have never had a problem with bonding, training or anything else with him.

I think it's the difference between researching the breed and going to a good breeder rather than just picking up a pup from any old breeder.

Tbh, if a breeder was letting his/her pups go at such an early age then i wouldn't touch them with a bargepole and would think it was actually animal cruelty.

Good luck with your search for a good breeder and your perfect puppy :flwr:

Bruce H
1st September 2006, 01:17 PM
I'll add my voice to the choir.

One month old is WAY too young; in fact, I happen to believe that 2 months is too young, although I know a lot of breeders let them go that young. I think the youngest we have ever let a puppy go was around 10-1/2 weeks and that was a very special puppy and circumstance. More typically ours go between 11 and 12 weeks. I can't imagine a reputable breeder letting a puppy go that young.

Cavaliers tend to take longer to mature than some of the other breeds and I believe they need that extra time to mature and learn to be dogs from the other adults in our house. Weather permitting, it's around 8 to 9 weeks when we start taking puppies outside to pee and poop so our puppy people have a bit of a head start on house training.

I know the wait is hard. I've done my share of waiting for puppies we have bought from other breeders. And I see what people go through that buy puppies from me. You wouldn't believe some of the pressure we get to let those puppies go home early. Or maybe you do.

Besides, it gives me more time with those little guys :D

merlinsmum
1st September 2006, 01:59 PM
I agree, I wouldn't go near a breeder who let pups go that soon. We got Merlin at 8 weeks ONLY because he would meet other vaccinated dogs ( i.e Grandma and Grandads ( both) )and the breeder knew that I had assisted my mum with her two golden retriever litters and spent all but 4 years of my life with dogs of all ages.- so I had some idea!

TBH - I would prefer to take a puppy as Bruce suggests at a bit older - let the breeder do some potty training - gives you a head start!

matties mum
1st September 2006, 10:07 PM
I have had 3 cavaliers and the first one Mattie was very young when we got him they said he was 8 weeks old??I donot believe he was that old He was so tiny Rocky was 16 weeks old and about 2 times as big and Barney was 13 weeks old I would not have a 6 week old puppy because I think that they should stay with there mother like Rocky and Barney did ?Aileen

SILVERDOLLY 2004
1st September 2006, 11:09 PM
Hi, everyone, I'm new to the forum and was interested in Steve's question as my family(all grown up) is hoping to get a Cavalier puppy in a few months time. Our dilemma is a little different because we may not have the pup until it is 14 or 15 weeks old (due to a holiday commitment)and I would be interested to to hear if anyone thinks that is just a little too late for bonding? This is all at the planning stage just yet but I have found a breeder I respect and am hoping to have a tri boy from a litter due this month. The pup would stay with its mum in the owners home until we are ready for him. I am not an experienced dog owner. Should I wait for a different litter and have a younger puppy - we don't want to miss out on too much of the lovely baby stage?

Bruce H
2nd September 2006, 02:23 AM
You won't have a bit of trouble with a puppy that age bonding with you. Go for it!! These dogs are very much people dogs; I think our dogs are more happy with human company than dog company most of the time. And, as an extra bonus, you may get a puppy that is close to housebroken if your breeder works on that.

In fact, we retired a boy from our breeding program that was about 6 years old. Just tore me (and especially my wife) apart, but there are limits as to how many dogs we can have. At any rate, even at that age that boy bonded with his new family and there was no question they were his family in a matter of weeks. We see him at least once a year when they bring him here for dog sitting over Christmas and there is absolutely no doubt they are his family now.

lorin
2nd September 2006, 04:54 AM
We're getting Abby at 8 weeks..we got Isabella at 8 weeks too....

:)

misty
2nd September 2006, 11:13 AM
Hiya

All I wanted to say is to make sure you get your puppy from a reputable breeder. I'm not sure where you live, sorry.

It is very hard to find a breeder that health-checks the parents and grandparents of the pup, but it is well worthwhile. There are numerous health problems with Cavaliers.

Also, you need to be sure of who the breeder really is. If they offer you a pup of 4 or 5 weeks old, don't go near them.

Watch out for ads in papers. These are often placed by puppy farms/mills, or their agents. If they offer to meet you with a puppy somewhere, this is a danger sign. Puppy farm dogs have an unknown medical history (obviously) and the parents will probably never have seen a vet in their life.... all this apart from the fact they are often kept in appalling conditions.

When viewing a pup, always try and see the litter with its' mum.

I'm not being negative - far from it. Cavaliers are the most wonderful little dogs - that is why we all keep getting them, despite their health problems. Good luck with your search. :)

Maxxs_Mummy
2nd September 2006, 12:54 PM
Silverdolly, you will be fine with a pup that age. As Bruce has already said, Cavaliers are people dogs and they do bond very easily.

We got Charlie when he was 20mths old and he's bonded really well with us. I have friends who have homed older dogs and other rescues too and they all bond really well with their families.

Never worry about a Cavalier bonding with you, you offer them a warm lap, food and TLC and they'll bond :lol:

Oh yeah and one point, if you don't want a dog that demands that you share everything with them including your bed, your chair and everything else then don't even consider a Cavalier :lol:

Personally, I'd never have another breed of dog (except maybe a Charlie :lol: ).

SILVERDOLLY 2004
3rd September 2006, 07:00 PM
Thank you very much to all who replied to my query about an older puppy. I am fully reassured about having a 14 week old now and will post again when we get our pup. I really enjoy the site and am learning so much.

Karlin
3rd September 2006, 07:24 PM
Never worry about a Cavalier bonding with you, you offer them a warm lap, food and TLC and they'll bond

Yep, the problem if anything is DEtaching them! :rotfl:

I've homed rescue cavaliers up to 10 years of age and they all bond very quickly with their new owners. My parents adopted a six year old retired breeding girl from a wonderful breeder, and she adores them. Indeed she barks at my mother when she's on the phone to me as not enough attention is going to Miss Lucy! :lol:

Of my three, I got one as an 8.5 week old puppy, one as a 10 month old, and one from the pound who is probably about 18 months old. None of them is any less loving and all three follow me through the house at all times, like my own personal fan club. :roll: ;)

Maxxs_Mummy
4th September 2006, 12:56 AM
None of them is any less loving and all three follow me through the house at all times, like my own personal fan club. :roll: ;)

Oh yes, but isn't it lovely how they show such unconditional love? I have to share my house with 3 human males and 2 doggy males and I know which I'd prefer anyday :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Sharon
6th September 2006, 09:13 PM
Silverdolly 2004

We are new to owning a Cavalier and had the same thoughts about bringing home a pup that was a little older. We were worried that if he was older, the bonding would be more difficult. We got Wrigley when he was 8 weeks and have had him for 6 weeks now. If we get another pup, I think I would want one that was around 12 weeks. They are very little when they are young and even at 14 weeks, you have to be very careful not to tread on their little paws as they love to get under your feet when you are not looking.

House training is definitely getting better as he is getting older. Wrigley rarely has accidents in the house, and he is very slowly getting out of the bitting stage.

Also, if you have children in the house, it would be better for them and puppy if it were a bit older.

Good luck for when you decide to buy one of these little darlings!

Sharon