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KingstonsMom
22nd September 2006, 08:36 AM
I've been reading some of the recent posts and they've reminded me of my own vaccination nightmares.

When I picked up Kingston from the breeder he'd had all his shots except for Rabies (he was already 13 weeks old). The problem was that the breeder does all her dog's shots herself. Apparently she buys the vaccines from a nearby vet.

When I took Kingston for his check-up 5 days later, my vet insisted that he have ALL his shots over again. The vet did not trust breeder vaccinations, saying the vaccines could have been stored improperly. I even put the vet on the phone with the breeder to try to work things out (to no avail).

Obviously I was torn over what to do but decided to go ahead with the shots because no one around here would accept Kingston for boarding, grooming, or obedience school without an official shot record. I called the breeder, who acted as if this had never been a problem before.

He had a set of shots three weeks ago and his final boosters today. I'm so upset that all these shots have been pumped into my poor little guy. His body just aches after getting shots. I can hardly pet him because he yelps so pitifully.

I thought today would be his last shots for a while but then the vet told me he'd need to come back for his bordatella. Too bad the breeder gave him his bordatella shot the day I picked him up!

I could gripe forever about the vet experiences I've had. I don't understand why they'd want to pump dogs full of vaccines they've already been given. Of course, the vets know more than I do and they could be doing the right thing, but I'm very skeptical.

Alison_Leighfield
22nd September 2006, 10:20 AM
If your little guy is yelping with pain from having these shots...then NO WAY if he was mine would I be taking him back just yet for even more...

This is awful...your poor little pup, if you feel that you really HAVE to return him so soon then ask your vet to use a different area for the needle..like the rear rump/top thigh area. You should not feel under pressure to have to do this at all, I would never vaccinate a dog if it wasn't 100% in full, good health, please be careful. If there was the question over his vaccinations in the first place then why wasn't he tested for his levels before his re-vaccination? ask your vet that.

And as for your breeder that is doing the shots herself...is she qualified to do this? ask your vet if this is even legal.
Did she give you paper work for the vaccination with the batch number etc? Perhaps in the future you could change to kinder ways to protect him like the nosodes?

Give him a gentle hug, poor litle fella :lotsaluv:

Alison, Wilts, U.K.

Maxxs_Mummy
22nd September 2006, 10:45 AM
Oh poor little Kingston and what a nightmare for you too :(

My Maxx had his shots every year but this year I gave him nosodes. Charlie was vaccinated last year just before we had him but this year my Vet couldn't vaccinate him as he's in the middle of immuno-suppressant therapy. However, he agreed that he could have Nosodes so they both got them.

I did have this ultra long discussion about vaccinations with James (Vet) & he did say that whilst he'd prefer to vaccinate every year, lots of clients choose to only do it every other year....

Personally, I hate the idea of a Vet over vaccinating and tbh if Kingston was my baby I would have found another Vet. Some can be extremely over bearing and not give you any choice in the matter :(

Hope the little man is soon better :flwr:

Bruce H
22nd September 2006, 01:05 PM
I think I too would be finding another vet. It's obvious he isn't interested in listening to anyone. We have never heard of any of our puppy people having that kind of an issue.

merlinsmum
22nd September 2006, 01:08 PM
OMG, I've never heard of a breeder administering vaccines themselves... Is this breeder a vet aswell?

Or is this regular in the US - I've just never heard of this in the uk - fogive me if I sound a bit thick?!

Claire
22nd September 2006, 03:52 PM
I know that Bruce and Kris give injections, or rather Bruce gives Kris injections, not sure what the norm is in the US or UK.

Denise G.
22nd September 2006, 03:56 PM
That's just awful--I would be looking for another vet for sure! I have an issue with vaccinations in general--and the fact that we're pretty much forced to over vaccinate our pets in order to have the groomed, boarded, etc. :x

The good news is that the bordatella vaccination is just something the vet squirts up your dog's nose to prevent kennel cough--it's not a shot, at least I've never heard of it being given by injection. It shouldn't be quite as traumatic for your little one.

Hope he feels better soon...

GudrunTheRed
22nd September 2006, 04:38 PM
My breeder gives her pups their first round of shots and apparently that's totally normal here in the US.

I'm so, so sorry about your poor little pup. I would find a new vet asap and tell your old vet exactly why you're leaving him. He sounds like an insensitive boor and I wouldn't tolerate him for a second.

Keep us updated!

RockNRollCav
22nd September 2006, 05:07 PM
There's a "nose drops" version of the Bordetella that we use, and it is the only kind our vet gives.

And, my breeder gave her own shots except the rabies which, I think, is required by law that it be administered by a vet. I could be wrong on that though.

In Kentucky, you can buy your own vaccines and give them to your own dogs, and everything is valid. It costs around $3-8 per vaccine as opposed to here (in Northern Virginia) where it costs $20-30 per shot :yikes

Cathy Moon
22nd September 2006, 06:39 PM
Wow, Kingstonsmom, the vet sounds like 'know-it-hole' and a sadist, too! :yikes Those shots shouldn't be that painful :cry*ing:

When we got Chocolate as an adult from her breeder, the breeder had administered all her shots except for Rabies. It was such a simple thing for me to call Chocolate's former vet, who kept track of what vaccinations were provided to the breeder for which dog by date. I requested a copy of all Chocolate's records and they were mailed to me. Then I took them to our vet, who updated the information into Chocolate's new records.

Chocolate's breeder is an extremely responsible person when it comes to her dogs, and there has been a very good relationship between all parties (vets and breeder.) When Chocolate passed her Therapy Dog International test, I took the paperwork to both old and new vets to have it filled out completely, no problems.

If I were in your shoes, I would definitely be looking for a new vet at this point, would not allow this person near my dogs. So sorry you had to go through this, but you can always say no in the future if something doesn't seem right to you. That kind of attitude is a red flag in my opinion.

Bruce H
22nd September 2006, 07:10 PM
We do the first round of vaccinations. The only vacination we cannot give is rabies. Our "Puppy Packet" has a shot record included with it that has all the info on exactly what we gave, the date and the age of the puppy.

As I said, I have never heard of this kind of an issue before. I hope you have other vets in the area.

WoodHaven
22nd September 2006, 08:14 PM
OMG, I've never heard of a breeder administering vaccines themselves... Is this breeder a vet aswell?

Or is this regular in the US - I've just never heard of this in the uk - fogive me if I sound a bit thick?!

WHOA--- breeders give shots ALL THE TIME. THE only shot that should probably be done at a vet is the RABIES. Shots aren't rocket science-- but when a vet can get them for UNDER ONE USDollar a piece and sell them for 12-40 bucks-- well, think about it.

BrodieSkyward
22nd September 2006, 08:16 PM
The same thing happened to me. I got Brodie when he was 4 months old. The records from his Breeder said that he received "puppy shot #1". The Vet said that he wanted to give them all again from the beginning because he had no way of knowing which shots Brodie had already received. I was naive at the time (Brodie is my first pup) and went along with what the vet said. In retrospect I definitely should have called the breeder and determined which shots were given so that they were not repeated! Brodie did not have soreness or any complications (that I'm aware of) from overvaccinating so I guess we were lucky there. He actually hasn't had any shots since then except for rabies (at 1 yr) and leptospirosis which I probably won't do again. I drive almost 2 hours to a holistic vet in Beaver, PA now for guidance on these issues. He runs a blood titer on distemper and parvo. We were just there a couple of weeks ago and I was surprised that Brodie's levels were still in the protective range (he is almost 2 1/2) so vaccination is not necessary at this time.

So you are not alone ;) ...this happened to me and I understand your angst. I hope your pup feels better soon...and I agree that you should find a new vet - sounds like yours might be a little hard headed. :sl*p:

WoodHaven
22nd September 2006, 08:28 PM
That's just awful--I would be looking for another vet for sure! I have an issue with vaccinations in general--and the fact that we're pretty much forced to over vaccinate our pets in order to have the groomed, boarded, etc. :x

The good news is that the bordatella vaccination is just something the vet squirts up your dog's nose to prevent kennel cough--it's not a shot, at least I've never heard of it being given by injection. It shouldn't be quite as traumatic for your little one.

Hope he feels better soon...

Some vets don't use nosodes-- the Bronchicine (bordetella shot), is a set of two shots 2-4 weeks apart.

judy
22nd September 2006, 10:59 PM
When i got Zack he had had all but the last of his puppy shots, so he needed one more, and also he had not had rabies or bordatella. I took him to my cat's vet and they wanted to give him all those shots on that day, even though i brought him in for bloody diarrhea, they didn't see a problem.

It's a mindset, traditional, but not up with the latest thinking in veterinary medicine, i don't think. Anyway, i wasn't offered the bordatella nasal spray, only the shot. Because he was sick, i said i wanted to wait and get the shot as soon as he was better and they gave him flagyl for the diarrhea. I had only had him two days.

A week later the diarrhea had cleared up and i brought him back for his shot. I chose not to get the rabies and bordatella at that time. I believed it was more sensible to not have them all at the same time, and someone i respect had advised me to postpone the rabies as long as possible anyway, a year if possible, though i didn't try to discuss this with the vet. Fortunately the vet did not try to pressure me to go against my judgement on waiting, if she had, i would've found another vet. (I ended up going to other vets anyway, but not because of that).

Zack's diarrhea returned right after he had his shot. In retrospect, i now believe it was medically a bad decision for me to allow him to have that shot. I should've waited another month to be sure he was well. But at the time, i didn't know what i know now.

This story of Kingston was painful to read. What i didn't understand was, didn't the breeder provide any documentation of the vaccinations? It seems fine to me for a breeder to vaccinate, but not fine if the breeder doesn't provide documentation so that you can take the dog to groomers and things like that.

I never did get the bordatella vaccination for Zack because the more i read about it, the more questionable it seemed to me. As he gets older and has been healthy, energetic and strong, from what i've read, he probably would not have a serious case of bordatella if he does get it. I have heard some breeders say that when they've given that vaccination, dogs have gotten kennel cough as a result of the vaccine. I have read the other side of this debate which says that it's just a coincidence that dogs get bordatella right after being vaccinated for it, those dogs were already incubating it and just happened to get it right after the vaccination. Maybe both are true. Maybe dogs were incubating bordatella and the weakening effect of the vaccine on the immunes system allowed the bordatella to become a more symptomatic infection than it would've been.

I have found that no one has asked me for proof that Zack has had the bordatella vaccination (or any other vaccination!). I'm quite sure though that boarding kennels will require it, they have to because even if it's not a severe infection, they can't allow an epidemic to spread. But i haven't been asked by obedience class trainers or by the groomer.

I recommend researching the subject of vaccines and being informed because many vets are not up with the most advanced thinking on the subject, as well as alternative views. The following are a few of several sources that have had an influence on my thinking so far.

The first two links, i believe, have the most hightly educated and research supported veterinary thinking about dog vaccinations--these are the leading veterinary professional organizations:

http://www.aahanet.org/About_aaha/vaccine_guidelines06.pdf

http://www.avma.org/issues/vaccination/vaccination.asp

http://www.vetinfo.com/dogvacc.html#Do%20I%20Really%20Need%20to%20Vaccina te%20My

http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/NY%20Pet%20Vax%20Bills%20S02164%20-%20A14253.htm

http://www.geocities.com/kremersark/CVC_2002c.html

Pavane
22nd September 2006, 11:23 PM
This is a famous family story because it shows my character. When I was 6, I was living in Japan in the 1950s. My father was doing business there and the only American school was on a US military base. I was allowed to attend. One day they lined up all the kids. The word spread: it was the dreaded "shot day." We had to get various shots for misc. Asian diseases. I never minded shots much, but I our family went to a private doctor.

When I got to the nurse, I told her this and she thought I was trying to get out of the shot. I said, "What shot are you giving." The nurse sniffed and replied, 'Paratyphoid."

I asked, "Part A or Part B?"

She said "Part B."

"But I just had that last week and you might make me sick."

Another nurse grabbed and stabbed.

An hour later, I vomited on my desk and passed out in the puddle.

My parents were called and I was quite ill. They were furious.

Since then, I vowed that no doctor would ever tell me what to do with my body--that I knew best and I taught the same to my kids.

BTW, my pup got his first 2 shots from the breeder. It is typical in the US and you can buy them easily through catalogs. Vets expect it.

Lisa_T
23rd September 2006, 02:05 AM
Wow! I'm another who's pretty certain that doesn't happen in the UK. I rather think that puppy shots (ie, first vaccs, at least) are combined with a full health check before the pup(s) are sold. Of course, you're still supposed to bring your new pup to your own vet regardless of the pup's vacc and breeder declared status!

WoodHaven
23rd September 2006, 02:10 AM
Wow! I'm another who's pretty certain that doesn't happen in the UK. I rather think that puppy shots (ie, first vaccs, at least) are combined with a full health check before the pup(s) are sold. Of course, you're still supposed to bring your new pup to your own vet regardless of the pup's vacc and breeder declared status!

remember that in taking the pups to the vet-- you could very well expose them to the deadly disease (a decent argument ). I take mine to the vet-- I HATE stabbing the lil guys.

Jay
23rd September 2006, 03:57 AM
My breeder gave my two their first set of shots and gave me a shot record. There was no problem with my vet. We are over due for a check up and I am still pondering whether or not to do boosters. We had the full set of puppy shots and boosters at one year. We are out and about with other dogs all the time (obedience classes and dog trials) so I am still on the fence. I agree with Woodhaven...I couldn't give those cute little babies a shot! ouch!
J.

KingstonsMom
23rd September 2006, 06:35 AM
Thank you for all the comments. It makes me feel much better to know that many breeders do their own vaccinations. I'm going to contact my breeder and ask her if she can come up with an official shot record for me somehow.

I promised Kingston that I will NEVER take him back to that vet after what happened last week. Kingston started having a bad case of diarhea so I called the vet for help. I was told "Sorry, we can't see him today." No advice, no nothing. I naively thought this would be a good veterinarian because he's located in the nicest part of the city. Too bad they tried to get me to buy everything under the sun, including a rattlesnake vaccine!!! (I live in an urban apartment!)

But thanks again for your concern. Kingston is doing much better today! I'm going to search for a vet who does the bordatella through the nose. No more shots for my little guy!

judy
23rd September 2006, 08:57 AM
If i remember right, the intranasal bordatella vaccination is faster acting than the injection, you can have it done relatively last minute if you need it for unexpected boarding or something, but immunity doesn't last as long as the injection. And the injection doesn't last that long as it is.

See for example
http://www.vetinfo.com/dencyclopedia/debort.html

This page
http://www.petplace.com/dogs/nasal-or-injectable-which-vaccine-is-best-for-your-dog/page1.aspx
(scroll down)

has some information I hadn't heard before--they say the intranasal should only be given the first time, and not for boosters, and not if the dog has previously had bordetella. I dont know why, they don't say, but they say this conclusion is based on research--something to look into.
They also discuss potential side effects of the intranasal vaccination--good to know about if you're going to use it so that you'll know why the symptoms are happening.

Here's an abstract of the study referred to in the article linked above. The bottom line is that in this study, the intranasal vaccine was found to not be effective in dogs that had been previously vaccinated or otherwise exposed to bordetella. The researchers recommend that it not be used except as an initial vaccination. I wonder if there's other research that shows a different finding.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12680446&dopt=Abstract

judy
23rd September 2006, 09:52 AM
This is from the UC Davis Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital vaccination guidelines, based on current research findings:


Canine Non-Core Vaccines
Non-core vaccines are optional vaccines that should be considered in light of the exposure risk of the
animal, ie. based on geographic distribution and the lifestyle of the pet. Several of the diseases involved
are often self-limiting or respond readily to treatment. Vaccines considered as non-core vaccines are
canine parainfluenza virus (CPiV), distemper-measles combination vaccine, Bordetella bronchiseptica,
Leptospira spp., and Borrelia burgdorferi. Vaccination with these vaccines is generally less effective in
protecting against disease than vaccination with the core vaccines.

http://www.vmth.ucdavis.edu/vmth/clientinfo/info/genmed/vaccinproto.pdf#search=%22efficacy%20of%20intranas al%20bordetella%20injection%22

Bruce H
23rd September 2006, 12:04 PM
Wow! I'm another who's pretty certain that doesn't happen in the UK. I rather think that puppy shots (ie, first vaccs, at least) are combined with a full health check before the pup(s) are sold. Of course, you're still supposed to bring your new pup to your own vet regardless of the pup's vacc and breeder declared status!

Ours go for a final health check a week or so before they go to their forever homes; that's also when they get their microchip. And, yes, we strongly recommend (but don't require) that puppy people bring their puppy to their own vet within a week or so of getting the puppy.

Our vet knows we vaccinate the puppies (and our own dogs) ourselves and there are never any questions. With the thousands of dollars we spend every year and all the new patients we have sent them, I don't think she would want to make us mad ;) . In fact, we have been kidding her about building a new wing and naming it after us :D

Maxxs_Mummy
23rd September 2006, 12:23 PM
Kingston's Mom,

I hate to say this but you have just learned a BIG lesson about Vets and nice areas!

Just because someone is in a nice area it doesn't mean they are a nice person or a good Vet :(

We have 3 practices in our town. The first is a HUGE animal hospital in the centre of town. They are grossly overpriced, run an apoointments system and the staff are stand offish and rude.

The second is in an expensive part of town and has just been bought into by one of the Vets who used to work in my own Vets. No one can understand her as she's bought into a practice that has an appalling reputation and tbh I am really surprised that the Vet who has owned it for many years and is now retiring, hasn't been struck off. I think everyone who has used his surgery over the years has a horrific story to tell - I know I have :yikes

The third practice and the one that I use, is in an old part of town nestled in amongst Victorian terraced houses. It has a tiny car park where we all jostle for space and it is just a 'sit and wait' system. You announce your arrival and get logged in then just wait until you are called. If an emergency comes in, it is taken for granted that they will be attended to first. The Vets are all wonderful and whenever I have had a poorly animal I have been told that if I am worried out of hours then just ring their emergency number - I have done in the past and either got advice or a Vet has come out.

Their prices are really good too but above all, they have the nicest staff and the Vets are wonderful :D Alison wishes she was nearer to me so she could bring her babies there too as she thinks my Vet is lovely :lol:

In all the years I have been going there, I have never had a cause to complain about them. How many practices would let their Vets spend 45 minutes talking to someone on the phone about their animal without charging them a penny?

Alison_Leighfield
23rd September 2006, 12:41 PM
Donna,

Your James is the best vet on this earth, and what makes it even better is that he has three Cav's himself and he UNDERSTANDS the breed.

Thats where they all seem to go wrong these vets and like every breeder will tell you ..."Every breed is so different" and how very right they are. Different health issues, different temperments....just all so different.

So while we quite rightly out of worry and frustration give them all a hard time try to help your vet along a bit, make them understand your breed, your particular problems/concerns....take with you concerning health articles, teach them! YOU pay the bill for them to look after YOUR dog, if you are not happy shop around, ask for friends opinions to their vets, ask to see the practice inside and out, and only when you are 100% happy take your baby along.

Yes Donna I really wish I had James on my doorstep, you are so very lucky, he was marvelous with darling Annie-Belle when you looked after her for me when on my holls, he is 1 in a million!

A pleasure to visit as well may I add girls!! ;) quite yummy!

Alison, Wilts, U.K.

merlinsmum
23rd September 2006, 12:42 PM
Hey Donna,

On reading your post, I would have assumed you were going to my vet!!!

Those vets that are really local and "advertised" do charge the higher prices and don't form a bond with any of their patients owners in any way.

My vet (is one that we as a family have used for over 20 years) - they originally only dealt with farm animals and then small animals so they all have a tendancy to bond with you in the same way they would a farmer.

Even the girls on reception will give you advice and will calm you down if you are in a panic.

The vets themselves are fabulous especially uncle Ian and Aunty Hilary ( of Rufford Vetinary group) who are currently treating one of my mum's goldens who has lymphoma sarcoma - even to the point they have given my mum their home numbers in case she needs help in the middle of the night. So I would like to say that there are some VERY good vets out there, it just takes time to find the right one for you and your fur babies.

Cathy Moon
23rd September 2006, 01:46 PM
Thank you for all the comments. It makes me feel much better to know that many breeders do their own vaccinations. I'm going to contact my breeder and ask her if she can come up with an official shot record for me somehow.

I promised Kingston that I will NEVER take him back to that vet after what happened last week. Kingston started having a bad case of diarhea so I called the vet for help. I was told "Sorry, we can't see him today." No advice, no nothing. I naively thought this would be a good veterinarian because he's located in the nicest part of the city. Too bad they tried to get me to buy everything under the sun, including a rattlesnake vaccine!!! (I live in an urban apartment!)

But thanks again for your concern. Kingston is doing much better today! I'm going to search for a vet who does the bordatella through the nose. No more shots for my little guy!
Kingstonsmom,
If you're not already doing this, give little Kingston little yummy treats when he is at the vets office to help him see this as a positive experience, not a negative one. We have been doing this with our cavvies, and they actually love going to the vets.

BTW, Kingston's photo is absolutely adorable!

Also, the bordetella drops for the nose are usually given when you need quicker protection, like if you're due for a bordetella shot, but you're boarding your dog within a short period of time. The vet may still want to give a bordetella shot at your next appointment to provide longer protection. So the nose drops are considered to be more temporary. :flwr:

Remali
24th September 2006, 05:08 PM
If your vet was uncertain as to whether or not the breeder really gave the vaccinations.....why couldn't your vet have done titers?? I guess if it were me, I wouldn't trust that vet any more. Too many vets like to load up dogs and puppies with way too many vaccinations. And I do realize that most vaccinations are very necessary, especially puppies. But, a couple friends of mine have titers drawn to see whether or not a vaccination is even needed. A lot less stress on the dog.

Maxxs_Mummy
24th September 2006, 05:26 PM
Yes Donna I really wish I had James on my doorstep, you are so very lucky, he was marvelous with darling Annie-Belle when you looked after her for me when on my holls, he is 1 in a million!

A pleasure to visit as well may I add girls!! ;) quite yummy!

Alison, Wilts, U.K.

Well, you know the answer - move nearer :lol: Yes, I think he's one in a million & so do all the Cavalier owners around here too. He upset my neighbour the other week though. They took Harvey (GSD) to see him and he told them that they wouldn't have so many problems if they got a 'proper' dog like a Cavalier :lol: He was joking but they didn't see it that way hahahaha

And yes, Alison, he is a pleasure to visit but he's far too young for either of us and he got married last year too. His poor wife has to put up with him losing everything as soon as he puts it down and just generally leaving mass destruction behind him - she's a lovely girl who has my sympathies :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: They had all three dogs dressed up for the wedding but the vicar wouldn't let them in the church :x

I was one of the chosen few who were allowed to view the wedding snaps too :D At least he had his hair a normal colour for the wedding too - it's usally blond with reds, blues, greens and yellows in it - sometimes a bit of purple too :lol:

Cathy Moon
24th September 2006, 05:40 PM
Wow, James sounds like he's really cool and a real character! 8) :lol:

Lisa_T
24th September 2006, 06:46 PM
Wow! I'm another who's pretty certain that doesn't happen in the UK. I rather think that puppy shots (ie, first vaccs, at least) are combined with a full health check before the pup(s) are sold. Of course, you're still supposed to bring your new pup to your own vet regardless of the pup's vacc and breeder declared status!

remember that in taking the pups to the vet-- you could very well expose them to the deadly disease (a decent argument ). I take mine to the vet-- I HATE stabbing the lil guys.

True, but I am in the UK. Given the way we seem to do things here, I'm not sure I have any choice. In any case, I don't get the puppy (currently known as Katie Claret- my mum objected to 'Claret' on the valid grounds that it sounds like 'Carrot' :roll: ) :roll: until after she's had all her puppy shots, and I'll probably wait a month or two before I bring her to the vet.

merlinsmum
24th September 2006, 10:12 PM
Not sure if its purely physcological but I will be taking my baby to the vets but I will ensure that he does not touch the floor or any other dogs so no greater risk than at home. That's how I did it with Merls and he has been fine.....

I see your point though Bruce/Woodhaven etc., In the UK we seem to be more " it won't happen to me" than you guys in the US. It may or may not be to our benefit in years to come!

judy
24th September 2006, 10:53 PM
Do you know if they really sterilize the examing table after the previous patient? I know that one of my vets offices didn't, i watched the other dog walk out and i was told i could go in. And maybe that dog was just there for allergy or a hurt leg, and was vaccinated and not otherwise sick, but i had already wondered that at a previous vet i'd gone to because they are so busy, they see patients all day long, and it wouldn't surprise me if they don't always do it. I've had them come in and clean up after i'm already in the room. I'd like to hope though that if a dog came in with distemper or kennel cough, they would be sure to wash down the table. Most dogs are likely to be vaccinated against distemper of course (and the vaccine is likely to result in lifetime immunity), but something like lepto or kennel cough, the vaccines are short acting and only protect against a small number of the actual strains, so hopefully if those diseases are suspected, they would wash up the exam room. Still, every doctor knows, doctors offices should be avoided as much as possible, they are not the healthiest places in the world to be, and unnecessary trips should be avoided. If breeders can vaccinate puppies as well as vet techs can, that would be safer for a puppy with a vulnerable undeveloped immune system.

merlinsmum
24th September 2006, 10:59 PM
Judy, I know my vet does - the table is always damp and you can see the wipe marks. My vets are very particular - they even provide treats for those dogs that need other stimulation when having injections. I do think they do think a lot more of their patients that we give them credit for sometimes..... perhaps we are just lucky with our vet

WoodHaven
24th September 2006, 11:06 PM
True, but I am in the UK. Given the way we seem to do things here, I'm not sure I have any choice. In any case, I don't get the puppy (currently known as Katie Claret- my mum objected to 'Claret' on the valid grounds that it sounds like 'Carrot' :roll: ) :roll: until after she's had all her puppy shots, and I'll probably wait a month or two before I bring her to the vet.

Hey, I (like many in the USA thought that was a french word)
Here is what I found:

Claret is frequently pronounced in United States English as /klæ'ɹeɪ/ as it is believed to be a French word. Although it is originally from the French word "clairet" the word "claret" is an English invention and thus is traditionally pronounced according to English orthography rules as /klæ'ɹɛt/.

Everyone needs to be aware of the laws of their cities, counties and countries--- Here in the USA - the only shot required is rabies. Each state in the USA individually decides if you need a prescription for the syringe-- but the drugs are available without (as far as I know). IF I need a silly antibiotic-- I need a vet prescription to buy. UNLESS I buy it for fish-- then I can get the meds without (I don't get this at all). IF I want Oxygen for welding-- no prescription---IF I want Oxygen for the puppies-- I need a prescription. (I don't get this at all). Weird

matties mum
24th September 2006, 11:07 PM
The vet I use always cleans the table when one dog comes out he takes some time to do this Aileen

Bruce H
24th September 2006, 11:23 PM
[quote=Lisa_T]


Everyone needs to be aware of the laws of their cities, counties and countries--- Here in the USA - the only shot required is rabies. Each state in the USA individually decides if you need a prescription for the syringe-- but the drugs are available without (as far as I know). IF I need a silly antibiotic-- I need a vet prescription to buy. UNLESS I buy it for fish-- then I can get the meds without (I don't get this at all). IF I want Oxygen for welding-- no prescription---IF I want Oxygen for the puppies-- I need a prescription. (I don't get this at all). Weird

I'm with you on the oxygen thing; I REALLY don't get that at all! Years back when we were getting set up, we ran into the same thing; couldn't get medical oxygen to save our life. Finally, one of the sales reps at a medical supply house told us just to buy welding oxygen. He claimed it was exactly the same thing and purity as medical oxygen. Said it was very important to not have impurities in oxygen used for welding. Been doing that ever since and it's a LOT cheaper; just not packaged in fancy bottles. In fact, for a long time we used an welding oxygen regulator (I used to do some gas welding), a little fussy, but it worked.