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cavimom
30th October 2006, 03:09 PM
My Lily is about 4 months old and I am trying to gather more information on overbites. Here is the situation - when I was talking to the breeder we ended up getting Lily from, there was no mention of her bite issue. The day we were to drive 4 1/2 hours to meet them and pick her up we got a call (3 hours into my drive). They had just returned from her vet visit and found out that a) she has a hernia (no big deal to me) and b) she has an overbite. The vet marked it as severe. I was not too worried when I saw her as it did not look severe to me and I didn't think it was much to worry about. When I got home and took her to my vet they suggested teeth pulling. I read all around this site and saw ho most say let it be as things sometimes correct themselves and why pull yet. So, I decided on that. Especially since one of the vets said something about pulling 8 (EIGHT!!!!) teeth and seeing how her jaw grows. I just couldn't do that to her. That is a lot of teeth at once, and she was eating just fine. I am just wondering if I made the right decision. Wait? Do something now? Do something later? She is in no pain and seems oblivious to the bite problem. Any thoughts?

matties mum
30th October 2006, 03:39 PM
Wait and see is what I would do----Aileen

Maxxs_Mummy
30th October 2006, 03:50 PM
Think I'd wait too. Eight teeth is an awful lot for a small dog to lose in one go :yikes Could you get a second opinion?

Barbara Nixon
30th October 2006, 06:33 PM
One of Teddy's litter brothers had an overbite, so was sold at a lower price. Some go right, but his didn't. Neither did that of a cavalier belonging to a friend's aunt. In the latter case, I know that there was no intervention and the only problem is that he is a messy eater, because he drops some of his food.

Harry & Heidi's mom
30th October 2006, 06:40 PM
harry has an overshot jaw, and as long as he can eat ok i'll leave him alone, maybe sometimes treating a "defect" causes more problems, as long as he's happy i'm happy.

believe me, harry can eat alright, so much so that we call him harry the hoover!

cavimom
30th October 2006, 08:00 PM
Thanks everyone. Lily does fine eating. So I am pretty sure I will leave it alone. I did get a second opinion and the next guy said 2 teeth only. That was better. I just couldn't do 8 all at once. OUCH! But he also said it was okay to not do it and wait. If we need to we can do it later. I did get a discount at the last minute of $50, big deal, so that was cool. Didn't even think of asking for it though. I was just so happy to get an adorable little cavi!

Lily cracks me up when eating. She doesn't stand or sit at her bowl. She grabs a mouth full walks away, drops it on the floor, sits and eats there. Then goes back for more and does it again. It is just too funny. Not sure why she does it.... :roll:

arasara
30th October 2006, 08:25 PM
Personally I would wait and see how she does.

But on the other hand, if you decided to go ahead and do it, it's too bad you couldn't ask your breeder to cover the costs.. .. .. $50 is nothing when you factor in anesthesia, pre-op blood work, and the vet care/visit. I was amazed after Kosmo got his hernia fixed and neutered it costed $460! :yikes :yikes :yikes

cavimom
30th October 2006, 09:11 PM
When I get her spayed and her hernia fixed it is only going to run my about $200, thank goodness. But to do the teeth as well would be another $200. I wish I could get the breeder to assist in paying, but her "contract" states I accept her as is. Of course, we had no option to change that considering that we found out during our journey to get her. But hey, she is healthy and happy....

bsam101
31st October 2006, 02:23 AM
My Belle had to have one baby tooth extracted when I had her spayed at 6 months because she had 2 teeth in the same place. The adult tooth grew in and the baby tooth did not fall out. She had a good baby bite, but it has changed a little in over two years.

judy
31st October 2006, 04:08 AM
excuse my ignorance about these things, but why does an overbite need to be corrected? What problems would occur that correcting the overbite is supposed to prevent? thanks

Cathy Moon
31st October 2006, 11:28 AM
excuse my ignorance about these things, but why does an overbite need to be corrected? What problems would occur that correcting the overbite is supposed to prevent? thanks
Judy, if an overbite is severe, the lower teeth hit in the wrong place.

JeanKC
31st October 2006, 01:14 PM
Beauregard has a horrible overbite. The very first thing twovets said when they saw him was about 'half his jaw being missing'. I can almost put my index finger in the space...and I suspect that's close to 3/4". He was a very small puppy, and looking back I wonder if it was because he had problems nursing. He has some problems with hard things, and takes a lot longer to eat a dog biscuit than the other dogs do. He has some problems picking up 'flat' toys like a frisbee off the ground...but he's figured out how to use his feet to 'stand them up' long enough to grab it.

I think dogs are like children...they adapt. For a puppy, there really isn't any adapting required... Beau has always been like this. He doesn't know something's wrong, and he just makes it work. If it causes problems later on, we'll deal with them then. We've known one of our vets personally (as well as professionally) for several years...I'd like to think if there was something he thought we should do now he would say so.

As an aside, we also got an extremely good 'deal' on Beau. In fact, the agreed upon price was cut in half by the breeder, although no mention was made of the overbite.

KC

cavimom
31st October 2006, 01:51 PM
Eveyone has pretty much convinced me to just leave it be. She does fine eating and such, so why mess with it. Don't fix it if it works fine!

Cathy Moon
31st October 2006, 05:08 PM
I would mention it to the vet each visit, just so they can take a peek and make sure the roof of her mouth is ok, etc. No big deal! ;)

cavimom
31st October 2006, 05:22 PM
Good point. I will make sure to do that.

Barbara Nixon
31st October 2006, 05:28 PM
You could also check, for yourself, that no tooth is rubbing on gum.

cecily
31st October 2006, 10:04 PM
Cavimom... keep us posted on how Lily is getting on.

As it turns out the puppy we're expecting has an overshot jaw. I haven't seen him (and won't, until we pick him up as he's in Scotland. We'll be getting photos but the breeder says you can't tell just by looking at him at the moment). Now, this doesn't bother me in the slightest as long as it's mostly a cosmetic problem. Apart from being a bit awkward at chewing or picking up things, or being a messy eater is there any other way it can cause them problems?

Overall I agree with JeanKC... I think puppies adapt just like we do :D

judy
31st October 2006, 11:32 PM
Hmmmm. Doggie orthodonture, an idea who's time as come. :)

Cecily--congratulations on the new puppy! You're getting him for Flea, right? ;)

Lisa_T
1st November 2006, 12:52 AM
Cavimom... keep us posted on how Lily is getting on.

As it turns out the puppy we're expecting has an overshot jaw. I haven't seen him (and won't, until we pick him up as he's in Scotland. We'll be getting photos but the breeder says you can't tell just by looking at him at the moment). Now, this doesn't bother me in the slightest as long as it's mostly a cosmetic problem. Apart from being a bit awkward at chewing or picking up things, or being a messy eater is there any other way it can cause them problems?

Overall I agree with JeanKC... I think puppies adapt just like we do :D

You may find he'll grow out of it? Chloe's bottom jaw apparently normal at 5 weeks, protruding a little at six weeks- but not noticeably so; very noticeable at ten weeks, and now at going on for fourteen weeks she looks much more balanced. There's still a gap in her teeth- bottom teeth in front of top teeth by a couple of millimetres- but it's rarely noticeable otherwise, and as her muzzle is still a little wrinkly, I'd think that it will virtually disappear as she grows. As you know, she can look a little boxerish sometimes, but we think that's mainly the effect of a very white chin :D :D

Re Lily, when I did some checking on overshot/undershot jaws the lit I found said either have the teeth pulled before the puppy gets her adult teeth, or wait until the puppy is older- apparently a muzzle and face can continue to develop and grow until the dog is 18 months. At that point if it's a real issue, then stuff can be done- but at least you'll know by then that that's the way your dog is, rather than fixing it and then wondering if it'll come right naturally.

cecily
1st November 2006, 03:37 AM
Cecily--congratulations on the new puppy! You're getting him for Flea, right? ;)

:lol: :lol: That's right Judy!! Given how well Flea bonds with puppies we're hoping Tandie will watch and follow suit!

cavimom
6th November 2006, 03:14 PM
All great ideas. My one vet tried to tell me I only had a few weeks window to pull the baby teeth so that her jaw would keep growing. Another told me we had plenty of time as the jaw grows for quite some time. I am stuck on waiting and seeing what happens. I will continue to post to this topic as she grows to let anyone interested know how it develops. Maybe I can even get her to pose for a good overbit pic or two. :) Yeah right!

Caraline
8th March 2007, 03:44 AM
I know this is an old thread, but I am wondering how everything has panned out for you guys with dogs with overbites?

Our little Beau (9 weeks) has an overbite of about 3 mm (ie 1/8"). The breeders told us about it very early in the piece, reduced his price & also offered for us to choose a different puppy or bring him back if after his first vet visit we were unhapy. So no complaints... the breeders were great about it. However, by the time we learned of this we had already bonded with Beau due to our weekly access visits and it seemed unthinkable for us to not still want him.

So far this is not posing any problems for Beau. His lower canines are not digging into his upper jaw, nor is he having any problem eating. In fact, I would not have noticed if it hadn't been brought to my attention. I do notice however that Beau's lower canines are slightly more curved than his uppers and I wonder if this is a compensation.

Anyway, having read all of the above, I am going to use the"do nothing" approach unless a real problem occurs.

Would love to hear back from you all though about how your little fellows have fared.

JeanKC
8th March 2007, 06:07 AM
Our Beau is getting along just fine...

KC/Jean

cooper&fergus
8th March 2007, 07:01 AM
Fergus has an overbite too. He got laryngitis at 12 days old and had to be dropper fed as he was not able to suckle. This apparently contributed to his overbite. He is fine, just takes a little longer over his food - mind you it doesn't seem to affect him when his granddad gives him steak...hmmm

Our vet said the main thing was to keep an eye on his teeth. They did a good check of his teeth when he had his neutering andthey check at all his vet visits. At his last check up they suggested brushing his teeth to help keep them clean and healthy. Other than that he is completely fine.

Lisa_T
8th March 2007, 12:28 PM
Amber's jaw causes no issues whatsoever with her eating, but I do worry that her mouth is overcrowded with teeth, and as reported before, the fact that her lower jaw is ever so slightly longer than the upper has caused one upper tooth in particular to grow in at a very odd angle. I mentioned to the vet when she was brought in for spay, and the vet said she'd take a look. I hoped she'd take the offending tooth out, but she may have forgotten about it. It doesn't seem to bother Amber, but it wouldn't take much for the tooth to go straight into the flap of skin over it.

Cosmetically, it's now only noticeable when you look at her from a certain angle in profile. To be honest, I don't think it's the jaw that's noticeable so much as the fact that she has a very tiny little black nose, and I think that makes her face look less in proportion than it actually is. I'm hoping her wee nose will catch up once the rest of her head has finished growing.

Personally, I'd be very interested in seeing pics of dogs with overbites/underbites- those that corrected, and those that didn't- from puppyhood through to adulthood.

Cathy T
8th March 2007, 03:48 PM
Shelby has a little bulldog mouth...but it's so cute on her...gives her some serious attitude! It doesn't affect her ability to eat...if you saw her inhale her food in 20 seconds flat you'd know what I'm saying :roll: I do have my vet check her mouth each time we go in. When she went in for her teeth cleaning last month she did need to have a tooth removed. The vet explained that her teeth were crowded and that was what caused the one tooth to crack. We don't expect any further problems though.

Zippy
8th March 2007, 04:02 PM
If you go to ...... Vetinfo dot com and Dog Dental problems ..... there's some good information about both underbites and overbites.

If only I knew how to make a link...arghh! ;D

Cathy T
8th March 2007, 04:07 PM
http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/dogindex.html#D

Here's the link. This site is bookmarked on my computer because it is soooo extensive. Great info on just about everything.

Caraline
9th March 2007, 12:53 AM
Hey thanks for the feedback. This has all been very reassuring. You guys are the greatest! :lotsaluv:

Beau is due for his booster in about a fortnight, so I'm going to get the vet to have a look and give an opinion, but I sure has hell am not going down the surgery/tooth pulling path with his baby teeth, but will keep an eye on the situation once the adult teeth start coming through.