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judy
20th November 2006, 02:19 AM
http://www.doggienews.com/2006/11/new-pfizer-vaccine-for-periodontal.htm

Pfizer just announced a new canine vaccine, porphyromonas. This is a bacterial pathogen so technically it's not a vaccine but a bacterin. But usually we include bacterins as what we mean when we say vaccine. Bordatella is also a bacterin. I think Leptospirosis is too.

Is periodontal disease common in dogs?

Darby's Mom
20th November 2006, 05:21 AM
Interesting! Thanks for posting, as I had never heard of such a vaccine!

I am anxious to hear more about it, as it becomes utilized in the pet population. There is a link with a little more information here (from your original link):
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=56910

Yes, periodontal disease is EXTREMELY common in dogs! Almost 90%+ of dogs have some degree of periodontal disease by the time they are 1-2 years of age. :?

Even with daily brushings, most dogs require ocassional professional cleanings (which require anesthesia).
Dogs who gnaw on bones help to keep their teeth cleaner than regular brushings, in my humble opinion.

Anxious to hear more about this new "vaccine!"

judy
20th November 2006, 06:48 AM
...Yes, periodontal disease is EXTREMELY common in dogs! Almost 90%+ of dogs have some degree of periodontal disease by the time they are 1-2 years of age. :?
Even with daily brushings, most dogs require ocassional professional cleanings (which require anesthesia).
Dogs who gnaw on bones help to keep their teeth cleaner than regular brushings, in my humble opinion.
Anxious to hear more about this new "vaccine!"

It makes sense that dogs who chew bones would have an advantage. In fact, i just saw this video in which a vet from the Pedigree company says just that, in explaining why dogs in the wild don't have dental disease the way domestic dogs do.

http://www.uk.pedigree.com/flash/oralCare/av_9.swf

I'm surprised to hear the 90% number because in all my life I haven't heard of it before, i mean, i never knew anyone who's dog had dental issues, and all the old dogs i've known have had all their teeth. But maybe it was "silent" disease?

Barbara Nixon
20th November 2006, 12:11 PM
Izzy has aweful teeth (very few left), yet Monty at eleven, just has more tartar buildup, nowadays, and has only had one dental in all that time. It's not down to diet, as all mine are fed the same.

Bones probably ruined Izzy's canines as a pup, so I don't use those anymore.

Another reason for wild dogs not having bad teeth is their relatively short lifespan. Most domestic dogs don't start problems until about 3 years old.

GudrunTheRed
20th November 2006, 02:50 PM
I was talking with my vet on Friday--I called the office to ask how much teeth cleanings are--and he just happened to answer the phone and we talked quite a while about dog teeth. He mentioned the vaccine and said he is very interested in learning more about it.

But the main thing he stressed was to not skimp on regular cleanings using either a soft toothbrush or using gauze wrapped around your finger if your pup can't tolerate a brush. He said to stick to it and almost any dog will get used to it after a little while.

Lisa_T
21st November 2006, 12:00 AM
For what it's worth, I think you can do a good deal even without official cleaning just by feeding dry food, and providing toys that are design to clean the teeth and massage the gums and being sensible about what treats, leftovers and tidbits you give. I've never cleaned Holly's teeth, but always done as above, and when I had her in to the vet's some weeks ago, he said that she had excellent teeth- especially given the fact that she's now over three- and that to keep on doing what I have been. Also, the back of one of the pedigree dentastixs packets said that a very high percentage of dogs had peridontal disease by the age of three.

For us anything that can help prevent it is a bonus because of the link between poor dental health and heart problems.

Barbara Nixon
21st November 2006, 01:18 PM
I tend to take information on branded dental chews etc with a pinch of salt. One well known brand made claims for a certain chew product, based on usage by about 30 dogs over a couple of months. The sample was too small, the time span too short and what proof was there that the particular dogs would get bad teeth anyway /

Monty has had no bad teeth and only one dental (two small loose teeth and a descale earlier this year) in his eleven years. Izzy who gets the same treatment, has had several descales, lots of extractions and builds up tartar within weeks.

Lisa_T
21st November 2006, 07:39 PM
I don't mean it claimed that 'if you chew this then...' it simply said that statistically X% of dogs had periodontal disease by the age of three. Given the posts above, I'm prepared to believe that. If it had obviously been promotional I'd have taken it with a LOT of salt, but it was stated as a matter-of-fact.

Cathy Moon
21st November 2006, 10:23 PM
From what I've read, brushing a dog's teeth just 3 times a week can make a huge difference! The bacterial infections from periodontal disease in dogs can affect the heart, so its important to have the vet take a peek at their teeth each visit. In the US, February is dental month, and there is a good discount on dental cleanings.