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Battie4
30th March 2007, 02:10 PM
I wa sjust wondering I see on the boards all the time that the cavalier puppies usually get along with other dogs and cats, but I was wondering if it was purely a socialization thing? Like if the puppy at a young age lives with the dog then it will be okay with it?

Cause one of my housemates already has a dog and though Im sure the cavalier puppy will be okay with it I wa sjust wondering if there was anything I should do beforehand or anything to make sure the transition goes smoothly? Any suggestions are welcome thanks!

Jon Chang

Caraline
30th March 2007, 02:20 PM
Hi Jon

What breed of dog does your housemate have? In my limited experience with the Cavaliers, I think they get on extremely well with other dogs. I've only just recently adopted Sonny the 2 year old, and now we have a 12 week old puppy & all is going extremely well with them & our Boxers.

I must say though that if the other dog is large and/or very vigerous then there would be some considerations and adjustments to be made.

Get back to us re the size of the other dog eh?

Battie4
30th March 2007, 03:48 PM
The other dog we have is a mix breed. It was a rescue dog that someone adopted that we then adopted from her. We have had her for about 6 months now. From what we have been told it is a maltese/poodle mix. It probably weighs no more than 15 pounds Im guessing. Its really a nice dog but needs a lot of attention. But we havent had any problem with it at all.

THe only other time it has been with another dog was when 1 of our other friends bought over his bulldog to play with it. My housemates dog (Sugar) wanted to play but the other dog didnt really care to play with her.

Lisa_T
30th March 2007, 10:01 PM
Sounds like a puppy will be a gift to Sugar then, if her instinct is to want to play! I had problems when Amber first came because Holly had no puppy socialisation at all (she was only pup/only surviving pup in a bad situation) and had only ever played with people. It took her a while to realise that the little thing that kept pulling her ears was just trying to play. Now they're lying cuddled side by side next to me, and earlier the three of us had an energetic (for them- lots of chasing!) game of fetch in the backyard. So you see if Sugar wants to play with other dogs, once she gets over the 'when is that thing going home?' stage, she and the pup will probably be great mates.

Having two dogs is great. Like Karlin, I can't recommend it highly enough.

Caraline
31st March 2007, 02:04 AM
As both dogs will be about the same adult weight and the existing dog has a sweet nature, they should both enjoy each other's company. It will be important for the puppy to learn not to annoy the older dog, even though they may be happy to play together most of the time. In my house I always feed the older dog first, then the youngsters, and I allow the older dogs to growl at & discipline the puppies if they are being naughty. Obviously this is all done under supervision.

Sounds like it should be fun. :D

Lisa_T
1st April 2007, 12:17 AM
Yes, I found that too. It's so tempting for us as people to want to 'protect' the puppy- but it actually works better if you leave the dogs to sort out their own issues. Obviously in the initial period, that means never leaving them together in the same room unconfined and unsupervised, and equally obviously if the older dog is being genuinely vicious towards the pup, step in. It helps too if the dogs have complementary personalities, which has happened in my case. Holly is naturally an alpha dog, whereas Amber has always been more submissive. As a result, she's responded extremely well to any disciplinary measures taken by Holly, but I posted many worried posts here in the early days and weeks!

Caraline
1st April 2007, 04:53 AM
Yes, I found that too. It's so tempting for us as people to want to 'protect' the puppy- but it actually works better if you leave the dogs to sort out their own issues.

I love the way my guys discipline Beau. They all have a different style. Sam just sits there all regal looking & does this low grumbling growl like a male lion. Would make the hair stand up on your scalp if you didn't know his temperament. Scarlett sticks her snout in Beau's ear & barks right into his ear hole & then wags her tail furiously when he starts. And Sonny does this kind of ninja lunge & snap, but never actually makes any contact.

I am marvelling at how in just 4 weeks Beau has gone from being a very annoying little ankle biter, to a calm & enjoyable little fellow that knows his place in the pack.

Battie4
2nd April 2007, 05:27 AM
So should I let it play with our other dog once it gets home or should I seperate them somewhat in the beginning? I guess one my biggest concerns is that it might catch something from our other dog. Our other dog is up to date on shots so I dunno if thats possible or not...

Caraline
2nd April 2007, 05:40 AM
So should I let it play with our other dog once it gets home or should I seperate them somewhat in the beginning? I guess one my biggest concerns is that it might catch something from our other dog. Our other dog is up to date on shots so I dunno if thats possible or not...

If the existing dog is up to date with all of his shots, you don't need to worry about the puppy catching anything nasty.

Yes, introduce the puppy to the adult at the earliest. I believe this is important. Do it with care though, don't just let the adult loose on the puppy or it will almost certainly get hurt in the enthusiasm.

I'd start by nursing the puppy and allow the adult to come up and sniff it. Give lots of patts, cuddles & praise to the adult so there is no jealousy. Once you know that the adult won't be too boistrous, then you can place the puppy on the ground, but under very strict supervision. Do this indoors, not outside where play can get too rough & out of hand.

One thing that many people overlook.... The adult must be given a place where he can get away from the puppy. Puppies can be extremely irritating & in-yer-face. So buy a crate & an exercise pen to put the puppy in and try to organise a place for the adult to jump up to or over, in order to get away from the pup.