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View Full Version : CKC at home while we work-Advice pls



sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 02:15 PM
Hi guys

So we've decided to get a pup. I'll be at work from 8am - 6.30pm Mon-Fri and my boyfriend most likely similar. We realise that its not fair to leave dogs on their own all day so we will probably ask the neighbour to pop in now and again. I also took some ones advice from this forum regarding checking on the pedigree chum website which dog would be best for our situation - You enter all relevant details including the amount of time each week that the dog will be at home by itself and it throws up a list of dogs that best suit you etc. Anyway it actually said that the dog we want, a Cavalier King Charles would be one of a few that would suit our situation.

I just want to know is it ok to leave a dog on its own and then make up to it with lots of love and walks etc in the evenings and at weekends?

A friend of mine had to sell her Bichon Frise because the RSPCA told her that they can actually suffer from anxiety attacks if left on their own?

Is this type of thing normal in all breeds or just some? And back to my original question - is it ok to leave our dog at home while we work?

luvzcavs
18th April 2007, 02:32 PM
I personally do not agree with leaving a dog on its own all day, especially a cavalier.
The walking and playing before and after work would definately be a benefit but I think if you really feel you need a dog and work full time you should look for a different breed. Not being rude just my honest opinion.

You could always consider doggy daycare or a petsitter for a few hours a day ?

sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 02:45 PM
Thanks for that. I don't think you're being rude,I really want to look into this as much as I can before taking the big step to getting one. I really do want a dog though,I'm very active in the evenings so the dog would get plenty of exercise.I'm curious though why you think a Cavalier wouldn't be ok on its own ahead of any other breed?

Jen
18th April 2007, 02:49 PM
I don't think there's any breed that likes to be home all day while their owners are at work, but it is what it is--I really think the majority of people work out of home more so than those that are at home or working from home. I would rather see a dog in a happy, well adjusted home with owners that work rather than one whose owners are home but don't provide attention, training, etc.--just because you are home doesn't mean the dog is being cared for, is my point.
That said, there are a lot of options for those of us that work. There are dog daycares and petwalkers. We have a dog walker once a day for our two, and I know they love it. When we are home, it's all about them--hikes, dog parks, etc. we take them everywhere. I really feel it's a matter of making what time you have with them valuable; don't let someone tell you that just because you work outside the home that you're not a good dog mom. In an ideal world, I think anyone would choose to be at home with their dogs, but it just doesn't work that way for a lot of people so we make it work the best we can.;)

WoodHaven
18th April 2007, 02:51 PM
Cavaliers are extreme people dogs-- some other breeds are very independent. A puppy will need to be socialized and housebroken and that means building a relationship with the dog. If you are absent for over 10 hours a day-- yikes.

tsorningold
18th April 2007, 02:55 PM
I would have to disagree with the first response.

I would have to say, how committed are you? How educated are you?

Personally I live alone and will be working full time and plan to pick my puppy up at the end of May. While this is not ideal, the reality is many people don't have the means to be home part-time or full time.
To accommodate my situation I have hired a puppy walker. I also can leave my puppy at the daycare (when he is old enough).
My family has an irish setter, whom we raised from a puppy. My whole family works full time but we made it work. Setters are prone to sever separation anxiety and need lots and lots of exercise, but knowing these things you can make adjustment to suit the animal. Because we did for her she is always happy and exercised, never crazed or destructive.
I think that anticipation is the key. I know of dogs that have owners home all the time, that are not as adjusted of an animal as some full-time working people. (and of course vice versa)Be educated, be honest with yourself about your means and abilities.

(Somtimes I think this comes down to a stay at home mom or working mom debate!)

sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 02:59 PM
Thanks for that Jen. I really do believe that me and my boyfriend would make great parents to our pup.

We bought a house in January and have a medium sized garden that our pup can run round in, and as I also said we'll take it on walks in the evenings and weekends, I may even get up an hour earlier to bring him/her for a walk!! :-)

I fell in love with Cavaliers when I first seen them and I know thats the dog for me. I've read a great deal on them and know that they love exercise, but at the same time are quiet and loving pets by nature. The last thing I'd want is to leave him/her on its own all day, but my questions is this also 'how does everyone else do it'.

Getting a dog walker to come by and bring it out for a walk is a greta idea, but we don't have a side entrance to our home and I'm not sure I'd give some one a key to come into our home while we are not there. Apart from my neighbour who is an elderly woman, but she wouldn't walk the dog. Unless we gave her the key to get the dog for the dog walker? Hmmm maybe there are ways around this?

Gracie's Mommy
18th April 2007, 03:07 PM
My husband and I both work full time, but until this week we've worked varying schedules. I work 8:30-5:30 and he worked 11-8. I would come home at lunch time and she we take her to doggie daycare once a week. Starting next week, he'll work 8-4 or 5 5 days a week. So, I will still come home for lunch and she'll be in doggie daycare twice a week. We play with her lots in the evening, take her to play groups, training classes, etc.

I agree with Jen...more people work out of home than in the home. And, you can still take care of your dog and be a wonderful dog mom even while working. However, leaving the dog home 8-6 five days a week is definitely not ideal or recommended. I would suggest that you look into pet sitters, dog walkers or doggie daycare...the neighbor popping in is a great start!

Kelly
18th April 2007, 03:14 PM
Our furbaby Chester is 8 months old & is at home during the day whilst we are at work.

I struggled with this to start with as I worried about what he was doing if he was lonely, etc. so I decided to pop home at lunchtime to give him a quick walk & a little snack. I still do this but it is only usually for half hour or so.

As this is all he knows, he is very well adjusted. He seems to sleep all morning & then plays in the afternoon. How do I know, well I went home early at lunch last week and he was so snug in his bed he couldnt even be bothered to get out & say hello. It was almost as if he was saying "what are you doing home now".

He has the run of the house in the evening & all weekend and personally I think he looks forward to Monday as he gets to rest up after the weekend!

WoodHaven
18th April 2007, 03:17 PM
I volunteer in cavalier rescue and you wouldn't believe how many "untrainable, misbehaving cavaliers we get to rehome. A lot of the time it is an unsocialized dog that was never housetrained properly as a pup.

Jen
18th April 2007, 03:22 PM
Cavaliers are extreme people dogs-- some other breeds are very independent. A puppy will need to be socialized and housebroken and that means building a relationship with the dog. If you are absent for over 10 hours a day-- yikes.

Our 2nd dog is a Minature Schnauzer, a much more independent breed than a Cavalier. Independent doesn't necessarily mean they like to be alone. With Gus, we've learned independent means he'll find his own fun--which sometimes can be destructive.

sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 03:27 PM
Would you suggest WoodHave that I have my pup properly house trained and then it would be ok to leave him/her on her own?

Its reassuring to hear Gracie's Mom, Jen, Kelly and tsorningold say that what I hope to do is not unusual or cruel.

I would assume just like you guys have said that the pup would get into a routine and quite enjoy both the company time and lone time?

mishmosh
18th April 2007, 03:27 PM
I personally do not agree with leaving a dog on its own all day, especially a cavalier.




Couldn't agree more.

Gracie's Mommy
18th April 2007, 03:29 PM
Woodhaven, Not to be contrary here, but I'm curious how often that happens with families who have people home much of the day also? First of all, it seems very stereotypical to imply that people who work outside the home have unsocialized, not properly housetrained pups. Second, I'm sure that tehre are many a rescue situation from families who are home often but still manage to not spend time with the dog.

Obviously, having a dog without putting in the extra effor to socialize and housetrain is not what any of us on this board who work outside the home are saying. I think that each of us take time in our way to make sure that our dogs are well-socialized and housetrained. A tsorningold put it, the issue is commitment and education...Seems to me that if someone is willing to put in the time needed to socialize, housetrain and build the relationship outside of work, that person has the potential to be an excellent puppy parent. There are exceptions to every rule...people who work can have great, well-adjusted dogs...people who stay home can have unruly, poorly housetrained dogs, as well.

Jen
18th April 2007, 03:33 PM
I volunteer in cavalier rescue and you wouldn't believe how many "untrainable, misbehaving cavaliers we get to rehome. A lot of the time it is an unsocialized dog that was never housetrained properly as a pup.

Sandy I work full time as does my partner, and both our dogs are housetrained, socialized and bonded with us. It has nothing to do with being home 8+ hours a day with them, it has to do with being commited--establishing a routine/schedule, and using resources--a dog walker, doggy daycare, taking them to training, etc. It seems as though you're implying that owners that work have ill-adjusted dogs. I don't agree with that at all. If anything, from what I've seen, owners who work put more time and effort into their dogs. I know we do.

sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 03:34 PM
Very well put Gracie's Mom. I think any one that goes to the lenghts of investigating breeds, going to chat boards to discuss best practises for their dogs etc obviously has enough responsibility to become a dog owner.

I hoped to get some direction when I came to this chat board asking my question, and I think the overall agreement here is that dogs can be left at home while their owner is at work so long as time, care, love and effort is put in outside the working hours when the owner is home.

natalieandmike
18th April 2007, 03:34 PM
I think you are very wise to look thoroughly into this before diving in to get a pup. Just because those websites say a Cavalier is for you (likely because they are loving, tolerant, and generally patient of your needs) doesn't mean they're the best fit. I entirely agree that you may need to adapt and consider giving a dog-walker a key to your house, budgeting in daycare, etc. It will be more enjoyable for you AND the dog if your dog is a true delight to come home to, and not anxious/depressed, etc. That said, what about considering an older cavalier or a rescue? They would be well-beyond their housetraining issues, and puppies REALLY do mandate you see them and take them out at frequent (1-2 hr!) intervals to be successful with their housebreaking issues and for the needed socialization of a puppy. Also, many people who have a Cavalier and who work have also found two dogs to be of benefit to the dog during the day (along with daycare, dog-walker, etc). just some thoughts. Good luck with your decision! Cavaliers are wonderful animals. All animals are wonderful. We should be good stewards of their care. -Natalie:dogwlk:

WoodHaven
18th April 2007, 03:36 PM
Our 2nd dog is a Minature Schnauzer, a much more independent breed than a Cavalier. Independent doesn't necessarily mean they like to be alone. With Gus, we've learned independent means he'll find his own fun--which sometimes can be destructive.


But even having *2* pets means they aren't ALONE. Dogs tend to be pack animals, even in this day and age.
Maybe I should have said that a cavalier successful puppyhood is dependent of proper socialization, training (manners) and housetraining. And when a pup has all these -- living with them becomes a joy rather than a nightmare.

ppotterfield
18th April 2007, 03:41 PM
All dogs as puppies would not be able to be on their own the hours you are gone. At a minimum they would need someone to come home in the middle of the day for a half an hour to an hour. After puppyhood I think most dogs do better if their time alone is considerably less than ten hours everyday but I believe it is do-able with the right dog, with smoe minimal help during the day and with good, consistent interaction in the evenings and on the weekends, i.e. the dog or dogs become your life outside of work. The problem with Cavaliers and with some other breeds is that they are very people oriented and that much time alone can change their personalities. If you search on this board you will find lots of threads on this very issue with a variety of opinions and solutions. It may well be worth your time to take a look.

Here is my situation: I work and leave the house at 7:30 am and am home about 6:00 p.m. most weekdays. I have a Cavalier and a Clumber who are two and two and a half years old, respectively. I am in the enviable situation of having someone at home everyday until 12:30 p.m. so the dogs are on their own (crated) for under six hours, not ideal but very workable. (Even with that when the dogs were puppies I took a late lunch and came home about 2:00 p.m. for 30 minutes, something I could do living under 10 minutes from my office.) In addition to the fact that there is someone home until mid-day, my Clumber gets a mile and a half and our Cavalier about half a mile walk every morning. They both get another walk (half to full mile depending on the weather) or attend a dog class or go to a local Dog Park every evening. If I did not have someone at the house in the mornings I would hire a dog walker to spend at least a half an hour with them as I think ten plus hours every day is too much time alone and invites behaviour problems.

If your neighbor is dependable and this is something he or she wants to do for you, you may be able to make it work, but they need to understand the committment. Perhaps a combination of a dog walker and the neighbor or doggie day care and the neighbor would work. You might also want to consider adopting an older dog so that housetraining and possibly crate training will be less of an issue (notice I did not say "no issue). There are threads on this issue on this Board as well.

One last suggestion if and when you get a new dog, regardless of whether it is a puppy or an adult, try to have at least a long weekend and preferably a little longer off work so that you and the dog can get to know one another. I have done it both with and without doing this and can attest that it is a great bonding tool.

Good luck to you.

sassy.pips
18th April 2007, 03:42 PM
Thanks natalieandmike, what you have said makes total sense, everyones comments have actually been beneficial.

I will look at our entire situation before I make a final decision.

It's great to see how other people do it though. Having my neighbour pop in is probably the best solution. As I said she is an elderly lady living alone, so I don't think she'd mind too much, if anything my dog would probably keep her company too!

WoodHaven
18th April 2007, 03:48 PM
Sandy I work full time as does my partner, and both our dogs are housetrained, socialized and bonded with us. It has nothing to do with being home 8+ hours a day with them, it has to do with being commited--establishing a routine/schedule, and using resources--a dog walker, doggy daycare, taking them to training, etc. It seems as though you're implying that owners that work have ill-adjusted dogs. That's a huge assumption to make and one that I find offensive.


If you are offended by what I said-- you are being WAAAYYY too sensitive. MY POINT WAS
She wants to get a PUPPY. AND be gone for 10.5 hours a day. IMAGINE the possibilities.

I have never assumed that ALL full time workers that are owners of dogs were ill trained, unhappy, or ill adjusted. THE POSSIBILITY IS THERE-- I've had to deal with the bad choices others have made.

WoodHaven
18th April 2007, 03:58 PM
Would you suggest WoodHave that I have my pup properly house trained and then it would be ok to leave him/her on her own?

Its reassuring to hear Gracie's Mom, Jen, Kelly and tsorningold say that what I hope to do is not unusual or cruel.

I would assume just like you guys have said that the pup would get into a routine and quite enjoy both the company time and lone time?

An older pup or a young dog that is housebroken is much easier to leave for longer periods of time. An eight week old pup would have to be taken out every couple of hours. That would probably be difficult to do (I don't know in your case- I work 10 minutes from home). Some people have had success in litterbox training (but I can't stand the mess the pups make with the litter and dust).
I don't want to disuade you from a cavalier-- they are the best dogs (I've had many breeds) lol. If you are fully dedicated (doggie daycare, a walker - a friends house for some time) it could work. But much like having a child-- you've got to plan and think longer term.

Jen
18th April 2007, 03:58 PM
If you are offended by what I said-- you are being WAAAYYY too sensitive. MY POINT WAS
She wants to get a PUPPY. AND be gone for 10.5 hours a day. IMAGINE the possibilities.

I have never assumed that ALL full time workers that are owners of dogs were ill trained, unhappy, or ill adjusted. THE POSSIBILITY IS THERE-- I've had to deal with the bad choices others have made.


I edited my post earlier to better get my point across--that just because someone is home all day doesn't make them a better owner. The possibility is also there for an ill-adjusted dog whose owner is home all day. I think this is a sensitive subject to a lot of us who work, because I personally know of people who have been denied pups from breeders who refuse to see that a dog can have a happy well-adjusted life regardless if the owner is home with them all day or not. I would like to think that someone who is doing their homework and looking for opinions PRIOR to getting a pup is probably going to be a good owner, regardless if that person is home all day or not.

Karlin
18th April 2007, 04:12 PM
I really agree with Jen's post -- this is not an ideal situation for a dog, but I too as someone who places rescue cavaliers, would rather see a dog in a great home that *takes the initiatives to care for a dog while at work* rather than have it in a home with people around all day who leave it in the garden, for example. I have seen some great working homes that accommodate themselves to the dog; and some terrible stay-at-home homes for cavaliers where the dog is totally neglected.

I am deeply disappointed that the Purina site actually suggests a cavalier as a breed that TOLERATES being left alone though as this is, to be honest, shockingly off the mark for this breed in particular. Like bichons, it is a breed well known for suffering from separation anxiety and which does NOT do well all alone all day, several days a week. They have hundreds of years of genetic engineering to make them bond tightly with their owners and want to be phsyically close to them (because one serious role for them was as a lapdog -- literally, a lap warmer in drafty unheated homes for hundreds of years past). They really need some sort of arrangements made along the lines Jen suggests: a daily walker, a stay in daycare, or family arranging to come home midday.

I would also say in totla agreement with Sandy, that you'd be MUCH better off getting an adult or puppy over 6 months of age. A puppy needs someone working to housetrain at least once every 2-3 hours for the first 5-6 months. It is very hard developmentally and psychologically on a puppy to be alone for 10.5 hours a day --that is just way, way too long. Even an adult dog would need to be taken out at least once and ideally twice if it is left alone for nearly 11 hours a day.

This is a well know dog review site that actually has RELIABLE pros and cons onbreeds and you will note top of the list is separation anxiety.

http://yourpurebredpuppy.com/reviews/cavalierkingcharlesspaniels.html

This all doesn't mean you shouldn't get a cavalier -- but it does mean you should carefully review how you are going to manage this (you really can't just have a neighbour pop in now and then to look in -- you will need consistent work to housetrain then quality time for a walk and human interaction every single day as you are talking about a particularly long stretch alone for a dog). I also always suggest that people who are away for such long hours consider whether a dog is appropriate to their lifestyle at the present time. Dogs are extremely social animals and as Sandy (Woodhaven) notes -- lots of problem cavaliers come into rescue because they are left alone too long every day and don't have enough interaction. The number one reason I get cavaliers into rescue is "we work and he needs more attention than we can give him". Cats are far more suitable to long working hours but even then I'd always recommend getting two so they have companionship.

The difficult fact is, our lifestyles have changed considerably since many of us grew up and had dogs around with a stay at home parent and all the kids at home after school. These days both people work, kids all go off to planned activities, and dogs can lead very sad and unstimulating lives because they are the wrong animal to bring in as a family pet. people usually realise this too late and the dog ends up at the pound (usually) or sometimes with rescue. But it remains the top reason dogs go to the pound -- 'we work and don't have time for him'. It is very very important to be sure you have the time and financial commitment to realise you will need to address your dog's social needs every day for the next decade -- which means paying for daycare, paying for someone to come in daily, or rearranging personal schedules to accommodate the dog's needs. Sometimes on reflection people find it may be better to wait on having a dog til job schedules are not quite so demanding or they live closer to home making daily trips home at lunch a norm.

Kelly
18th April 2007, 04:26 PM
From personal experience, after the initial few weeks it all just falls into place. Granted housetraining will take a little longer but Chester has managed it. At first he used the puppy training pads and even now I put one down just in case, but he hasnt used it for months now. In fact, I think he uses it as a mat to dry his feet!

I take Chester for a 10-15 min walk in the morning and again at lunchtime. If he doesnt get a walk at lunchtime then we play ball in the garden. In the evening he gets a good 40 min walk, mostly off leash, and run of the house. He also goes to Puppy Class on a Thurs night.

It's one of those questions that will always get a split answer, just like having children & putting them in childcare all week. At the end of the day, if you want a puppy & feel you are 100% ready, who are any of us to tell you what's right or wrong.

I love my furbaby more than I ever thought I could and wouldnt be without him and I am pretty sure if he could talk he'd say how much he adores us but am pretty sure he'd also say how much he likes it when we go to work so he can finally get some peace & quiet and do what dogs do best..... eat & sleep!

Gracie's Mommy
18th April 2007, 04:52 PM
Well said, Kelly! LOL, too! I've learned to not worry about Gracie at all in the mornings. Even when we are home, she runs back up to her crate to sleep from 9-12 on weekdays. I agree, to some extent, she must look forward to her peaceful/quiet mornings!

Karlin...excellent points, as always!

Kodee
18th April 2007, 05:48 PM
My husband and I both work full time, but until this week we've worked varying schedules. I work 8:30-5:30 and he worked 11-8. I would come home at lunch time and she we take her to doggie daycare once a week. Starting next week, he'll work 8-4 or 5 5 days a week. So, I will still come home for lunch and she'll be in doggie daycare twice a week. We play with her lots in the evening, take her to play groups, training classes, etc.

I agree with Jen...more people work out of home than in the home. And, you can still take care of your dog and be a wonderful dog mom even while working. However, leaving the dog home 8-6 five days a week is definitely not ideal or recommended. I would suggest that you look into pet sitters, dog walkers or doggie daycare...the neighbor popping in is a great start! I think you have pretty much nailed it on the head. It can work but you have to be willing to go the extra mile like you do - home a lunch, dog walker and lots of attention at night to train it to be a confident socialized pup. I have owned labs all my life - and what they say about a cavalier needing the one on one more is true. It is not the same as other breeds - they thrive and need that extra. A dog walker/daycare will be needed - its an expense or arrangement with a friend/relative that needs addressing.

Barbara Nixon
18th April 2007, 06:13 PM
Most UK rescues and all the cavalier breeders, that I know, will not let a puppy go to a home where it is likely to be left for a long time. Some rescues won't let any dog go to a home where it will be left alone, whereas others suggest an older dog, who is happy to snooze the day away.

I have three cavaliers (four until recently) but wouldn't dream of leaving them for more than 4 hours and most times they're left up to 2 hours only. Howver I had a couple of springers, then a collie cross, when I was working full time, but my father lived in the next road and always collected them at about 9am and kept them until we got home.

Justine
18th April 2007, 07:21 PM
if you guys are at work how about a cat,they are more independant.

arasara
18th April 2007, 07:34 PM
I really think it depends on your level of comittment to your dogs. Both Avi and I work during the day - we don't work 8 hrs because of the dogs but we do work. I go back to school in Sept so it's just temporary but I can guarantee you my dogs are well behaved. It's because I put in the work with them.. I wake up really early to walk/feed/play with them, they sleep with us, I take them to the park after work for about an hr.. then we go on a little walk.. in for dinner.. down to the basement to play with toys, etc. We have a blast together. On the weekends I have taken them to classes and I generally spend my weekends with them and only them.. .. Kosmo is a certified therapy dog now and Faith is on her way up. They do great even with us working. ;) Good lucK!

moniechris
18th April 2007, 08:00 PM
As someone who works full time, as well as sorts through hundreds of applications for Cavalier rescue, I can attest that it is possible to work full time and own a cavalier. I own 3 cavies + a shih tzu and they are completely used to our weekday routine. We wake up, romp and play for about an hour in the back yard or inside, and when I say "kitchen up" they all go running into their beds in the kitchen and get a cookie. They are just fine with each other, toys and some soft music. While the pups were little, we would come home for lunch and potty them, but now that they are older they do just fine during the day. I work from 7:30am-4pm and most of the time they are asleep when I come home. What is important is that they are not crated all day, but have a tiled room to themselves that is safe for them to be in alone. After work is all about them.

Rescue has placed dozens of dogs in working homes, as long as they are willing to commit. Too many times we get dogs into rescue because of "time issues" and it basically that interprets to people not wanting to put in the extra work. But I will never put aside an application that it otherwise PERFECT because the people work all day.

My fiancee and I had to make major adjustments in order to compensate time for training, snuggles and play time and it often means while at social gathering we have to say "we have to leave because of the dogs" (which is a grerat excuse, btw ;) ). Each dog gets their one on one time and that is truly important.

enchantingdragon
18th April 2007, 08:04 PM
Like someone said before this is always a sensative subject as so many of us have to work full time just to get by. When I first started looking at breeders many wouldnt sell to my husband and I simply because we both worked out of the house. One breeder I spoke to told me flat out she would never sell a dog to me because of that. Talk about rejection! Well I continued to talk to her and even went to visit and after all the time and effort I put in trying to show her that even though we wouldnt be home 24/7 the time we were home our pup we be spoiled and loved the the fullest she told me she would happily sell us a dog whenever we wanted. I was tickled pink but in the end we didnt buy a dog from her simply due to timing nothing else.

My husband and I both work out of the home though my husband is a teacher and thus is home earlier then most people and has a lot more time off then others (I am working toward getting into education myself right now) Originally when we were planning on getting a puppy we were planning on waiting til the summertime so that he could be home with the puppy. Life changed on us and we ended up getting a 6 month old pup instead and everything worked out wonderfully. In fact the breeder we got Ellie from is a full time out of the house worker as well and all 7 of her dogs stay crated during the day while she and her husband work but they do have a dog walker come by to check on the dogs twice a day as well. That part was a bonus for us as Ellie was use to staying in her crate during the day anyway. As a note though I do also have 3 cats so she isnt alone alone though she is in her crate and the cats have free range of the house.

With that said I agree that if you do get a puppy you will definitly need to make arrangements with a neighbor or a do walker as a puppy will need to be let out a lot more then a regular dog. If you can arrange for someone to come home and let him out or come home during your lunch that would work. Another thought is getting an older dog. When we got Ellie she was 6 months old and fully housetrained so thats an option you should keep open as well. Also whenever you get the pup you should try to do it over a long weekend or try to take off from work to help it get adjusted a little first.

In the end I agree with most posters here who simply said that if you are willing to put the time and effort and make arrangements when necessary a Cavalier can adjust to your routine and be a happy well socialized dog. Good luck!

George19
18th April 2007, 08:19 PM
if you guys are at work how about a cat,they are more independant.

Most people who want to share their life with a dog want companionship, some are single and/or elderly and they want a friend to spend the day walking with, to take to the countryside on holiday, to develop an interest and bond with such as training, agility or showing. I doubt very much that an independent cat will ever fill this role.

That said, of course it's important to consider the dogs needs and there must be robust plans in place to cater for these.

murphy's mum
18th April 2007, 08:55 PM
My O/H and I work full-time as well, Murphy is now just over a year old, it was a tough year at some points, but I'd do it all again in a flash:smile:

We got him at 8 weeks, and stayed off with him for 2 weeks, he needed out every 1hr to 1hr & a half, when we went back to work we used puppy pads. O/H works 8 till 4, and I work 8.30 till 4.30, one of us came(and still comes) home for lunch, if we couldn't make it his Mum or Dad did. If I have free time at work I nip home too.

It did take longer to house-train Murphy, and he destroyed the kitchen lino:rolleyes: obviously didn't like it cause it was green:lol:, and chewed the door frame, 1 kitchen cupboard, the wood at the stairs and my new super-king bed. He peed on the duvet 4 or 5 times, even though I replaced it each time he did it. He also pooped at the bottom of the stairs from about 6 months on, it took us ages to stop him. We learned not to let small puppies out of your sight

He doesn't toilet in the house now, but my point is any puppy is hard work, when your working it's even harder, but as I said I'd do it again:D

He now knows his routine, when I put my jacket on in the morning he goes to his bed in the kitchen, and waits for his biscuit:lol: He sleeps most of the day, even when we're off, and at night it's playtime ALL night, except of course when it's time for cuddles:luv: And when it time for bed, well Murphy's normally 1st on to it, he even puts his head on the O/H pillow.

We make sure Murphy gets lots of exercise, and attention, he's stopped chewing the wood now too

Kodee
18th April 2007, 09:11 PM
It did take longer to house-train Murphy, and he destroyed the kitchen lino:rolleyes: obviously didn't like it cause it was green:lol:, and chewed the door frame, 1 kitchen cupboard, the wood at the stairs and my new super-king bed. He peed on the duvet 4 or 5 times, even though I replaced it each time he did it. He also pooped at the bottom of the stairs from about 6 months on, it took us ages to stop him. We learned not to let small puppies out of your sightAnd knowing all that (as pet owners we all have puppy trial stories similar), I still opted to "have all this fun again" after our lab was gone, because I know the extra work will be worth it with many yrs paid back in love!

murphy's mum
18th April 2007, 09:21 PM
And knowing all that (as pet owners we all have puppy trial stories similar), I still opted to "have all this fun again" after our lab was gone, because I know the extra work will be worth it with many yrs paid back in love!

Yea, and you know why else cause nothing beats a Cavi cuddle when you come in from a s**t day:l*v:

*Pauline*
18th April 2007, 09:32 PM
Hmmm...shall I get involved in this? No one bite my head off ok! Um...No one can deny its' better to be at home with your dog. You can't say some dogs whose owners are at home all day can neglect their dogs. This is a different issue. Anyone can neglect a dog, working or not. The issue is a lonely dog and house training.

If you have to work and still want a dog, I think you have to get good day care. I don't think half an hour at lunch time is enough. I took Dylan out for his toilet every 20 minutes and this helped me train him in 4 weeks. Can you take a month off work?

This weekend I had to stay home as my doggy sitter let me down and I had big plans. Dylan is 7 months old but I don't think it's OK to leave him all day. I do go out however! 4 hours would be my occasional maximum or I usually take Dylan with me.

I personally wouldn't get a dog if I was working full time but if you do, I'd say day care is they way to go. :D

Lisa_T
18th April 2007, 09:56 PM
I'm inclined to think that maybe an older pup (even a four month old pup is easier than a 8 week old) or a rescue would be better for your situation. Especially if you've never done it before- you don't realise just how much is involved until you do it. Perhaps you'll be lucky- maybe your elderly neighbour will fall in love with the pup to the extent that she will be willing to spend a substantial amount of time with it during the day- that would be ideal, really. The other thing is that if you get an older pup and then decide to get a second dog, the wait should not be as long- although again, that depends on training more than the age of the original dog. Mine have only very rarely been left for 6 hours- generally the maximum they're left for is four hours, maybe five hours- if I know I'm going to be longer I arrange cover, and that's with two dogs. When I just had Holly, I hardly ever left her for longer than four hours.

Lynn
19th April 2007, 01:55 AM
I have to chime in.... I agree with those who say Cavs should not be left alone all day. We had the pups in their kennel at home for 2 months (Nov & Dec '06) while dh & I worked full time. (Molly was alone until we got Maxwell on the 10th of December) Our 18 yr old son came home to check on the pups and give them a walk / pee / snuggle break half way through the day. Those two months when I was at work I was a complete emotional wreck!!! I quit my (dead end) job at the end of December because the stress of leaving them alone had become too much. I needed to be home with them.

Something that I think might be missing from this conversation is the emotional aspect of owning a cavalier. I NEVER would have imagined that I could totally and completely fall in love with (a) dog(s)!!!! And my husband has also! These puppies bring us so much joy. Dh & I are (almost) empty nesters, and our puppies have become our precious babies. You can talk about day care and dog walkers, but you will have to find someone very special that you can entrust your sweet little angel with. After you fall in love with your Cavalier, there might not be many people / places good enough!!! Cavaliers are the most gentle, loving, caring and precious beings...you might find yourself wanting to do whatever you can to make sure that they are getting the best care as you can give. For me, that meant being at home for them.

(I'm not saying that my experience is 'normal', 'right' or 'wrong'....it's just what happened with me)

enchantingdragon
19th April 2007, 02:36 AM
Something that I think might be missing from this conversation is the emotional aspect of owning a cavalier. I NEVER would have imagined that I could totally and completely fall in love with (a) dog(s)!!!! And my husband has also! These puppies bring us so much joy. Dh & I are (almost) empty nesters, and our puppies have become our precious babies. You can talk about day care and dog walkers, but you will have to find someone very special that you can entrust your sweet little angel with. After you fall in love with your Cavalier, there might not be many people / places good enough!!! Cavaliers are the most gentle, loving, caring and precious beings...you might find yourself wanting to do whatever you can to make sure that they are getting the best care as you can give. For me, that meant being at home for them.

I totally agree with you Lynn in that you absolutely fall in love with these little dogs. I knew I would love Ellie but I never knew HOW MUCH I would fall in love with her. She is my princess and from the moment I wake up to the moment we fall asleep together snuggled in bed I want to be with her, spend time with her, snuggle with her, play with her, etc.

I absolutely love sleep. Ask anyone. On the weekends I frequently take about 2 naps a day even after sleeping in. My husband knows that once I go to bed I do not want to be disturbed as sleep is so precious to me and I never get enough of it but when Ellie has diaherrea and starts to cry at all hours of the night I find myself outside with her in the dead of the night gently rubbing her head and ears as she goes. It doesn't matter what time it is or how many times every time she cries Im right out of bed and on my way out the door with her without a second thought. Perhaps this is good practice for future children as well :p

With that said I hate going to work everyday (for many reasons ;)) and it breaks my heart to see her looking at me as I leave but unfortunately for right now at least, my husband simply cant afford to pay the mortgage by himself and I dont want him to have to kill himself working two jobs just to take care of his family. Though I hate working and leaving Ellie I know that the time my husband and I spend with her when we are home lets her know that she is loved by us both and though we do have to leave during the week as soon as we come home its all about her. In the end though Im sure other Cavalier owners who work will agree when we say the quality of time we spend with our beloved dogs makes up for the quantity. :D

Azriel
19th April 2007, 06:09 AM
although i do not currently have my own dog, i have had lots of experience in helping raise pups. i was the neighborhood kid who everyone hired to take their dog out for a mid-day break (never had more than one "job" at a time since i wouldn't have time to devote to more than one household each day). i helped raise my neighbor's black lab and she minded me better than her owners who worked. my other neighbor got a pup when he workes 10 hour days and i took her out for two hours everyday to train and exercise. and i can honestly say that the only reason i was willing to take those jobs on is becuase i am a dog fanatic and my parents wouldn't let me get my own pooch.

it is a HUGE responsibility to ask someone else (especially a neighbor) to take your dog out EVERY SINGLE day, not from time to time. i am not trying to sound discouraging because you can have a dog and work full time, but hire someone who cna do it as a job, not a favor. a neighbor who is doing it as a favor may feel like they got pushed into more than they bargained for. also, think about how elderly the neighbor is. not to sound mean but what if she broke a hip, or had to move, or passed on.... even a fully trained adult dog should not be asked to hold it for 10.5 hours. it can lead to kidney stress and eventually kidney disease. please make sure you fully prepare for someone to take the dog out for a LONG period of time, not just a potty break, every day. 10.5 hours is a long time in one stretch.

all that said, if you have the financial means and an available dog-sitter or day care, and are fully prepared for all else that comes with a dog, go for it! i am counting down the days until i can get my own baby (2-4 years).

Julie S
19th April 2007, 07:03 AM
What an interesting thread. I just love it when the "work or not work" issue comes up, as I get to hear everyone else's story. :D

OK - realize that I'm by no means an expert on Cavaliers (uh, Scout still has two more days until he even comes HOME :p ) but we have put a ton of thought into this and think we've come up with a good solution ... for now. We'll obviousy adjust as he gets older and we get to know him, but here's our story, since you all have shared so kindly ...

I work 2, sometimes 3 days a week. Hubby does 4. So we figure that there will probably be two days maximum when he will be at home without one or both of us. I feel extremely uncomfortable leaving a 12 wk old puppy without any way to potty (not to mention socialization) for more than a few hours. We've arranged for a very highly recommended dog walker to come twice a day (oh lord - you can only imagine how $$ this is getting!) ... once at 10:30, and once at 3:00. Hubby works close enough to home to come home to Scout at lunch ... but only for about half an hour. This arrangement will go on for probably a few months, and then we might try the dog walker coming once a day and see how his little bladder does.

I feel extremely lucky to work part-time, or else I doubt we'd be getting a puppy. I know for a fact our breeder wouldn't have sold us one of her precious pups if our situation was different.

I know on this board, and my friends in real life ... TONS of people who work full-time and make it work. I think the right doggy daycare can be FABULOUS. I can't wait 'til Scout's old enough to handle it. I know we'll try it out when the time is right.

As has been reiterated above, Cavaliers need tons of attention. Although I doubt any breed of dog really appreciates being left alone all day long, and night, without attention. Now that is really sad.

Hope that gave you some insight. :)

Caraline
19th April 2007, 07:17 AM
Ok here's my take... and I am going to hide behind the garbage tin & put the lid on my head for safety, as everyone pelts me with stones :razz:

Agreed, a loving, involved working couple make a far better home than an at home family that throws the dog his dinner once a day & cleans the water dish out once a week.

Having said that, I always feel really sad for dogs that spend 5 days a week on their own... especially if they haven't even got a backyard to run around in.

So.... if I were in your situation {this is where I need my protection} I'd get two puppies. I know! I know! It is considered a big no-no for all sorts of reasons... but that is what I would do. :D We have always been a multi-dog family & I would never again have a sole dog. Dogs are pack animals and they need company.

As to the CKCS being a good dog for a working couple. I can not agree with that. I think Cavaliers & Boxers (my other breed) are two breeds that really need company most of the time.

BTW, my hubby & I are semi-retired & work 2 short days per week. I hate leaving our 4 on their own while we are at work, but at least we have the comfort of knowing they have each other.

After-thought: What about an adult & a puppy???

matties mum
19th April 2007, 07:35 AM
Ok here's my take... and I am going to hide behind the garbage tin & put the lid on my head for safety, as everyone pelts me with stones :razz:

Agreed, a loving, involved working couple make a far better home than an at home family that throws the dog his dinner once a day & cleans the water dish out once a week.

Having said that, I always feel really sad for dogs that spend 5 days a week on their own... especially if they haven't even got a backyard to run around in.

So.... if I were in your situation {this is where I need my protection} I'd get two puppies. I know! I know! It is considered a big no-no for all sorts of reasons... but that is what I would do. :D We have always been a multi-dog family & I would never again have a sole dog. Dogs are pack animals and they need company.

As to the CKCS being a good dog for a working couple. I can not agree with that. I think Cavaliers & Boxers (my other breed) are two breeds that really need company most of the time.

BTW, my hubby & I are semi-retired & work 2 short days per week. I hate leaving our 4 on their own while we are at work, but at least we have the comfort of knowing they have each other.

After-thought: What about an adult & a puppy???

I am not going to pelt you with stones because I agree
we had 2 cavaleirs and made it work one at once with Mattie he was left when I went to work very early so he was asleep then when my o/h went to work the kids were there till they went to school so that was it till I got home at about 11
I would get 2 together if possible again what about a adult & a puppy
---Aileen and the gang (Jazzie--Barney--Sam)

PamH
19th April 2007, 12:23 PM
My situation is a little different. My husband is retired, but I work.
When we first got Maddy she was 3 months old. She was not housetrained. At the breeders she had a yard where she may have gone potty, but she was not trained to bark or go to the door.
I work in NH during the week and go home to Florida Fri/Mon, Thurs/Sun etc.
The first month she was with us, she was not left alone for more than one hour. Between the two of us, someone was with her. This meant that my husband's usual 4 times a week golf games were cancelled, his fishing was cancelled unless I was there. After that we had an xpen for her and hubby would go to play golf and put a puppy pad in the xpen. If she needed to pee, she used the pad. We quickly found out that the need for a poo made her climb out of her pen to do so on the kitchen tile! She would not poo on the pad. So even though she could climb out of the pen she only did when nature called. Now, at 7 months old she can usually wait until hubby gets home to go outside and has not used the pad in ages. She has climbed out once in the last month though to poo. When I get home for the weekend I still cannot bring myself to play golf, I spend the time with her.
We both cannot believe how much we love her. She is so sweet and loving.
I think if you can take a week vacation when you get her (two if possible) it would really help to set the stage for the basics.
Pam

sassy.pips
19th April 2007, 12:37 PM
My situation is a little different. My husband is retired, but I work.
When we first got Maddy she was 3 months old. She was not housetrained. At the breeders she had a yard where she may have gone potty, but she was not trained to bark or go to the door.
I work in NH during the week and go home to Florida Fri/Mon, Thurs/Sun etc.
The first month she was with us, she was not left alone for more than one hour. Between the two of us, someone was with her. This meant that my husband's usual 4 times a week golf games were cancelled, his fishing was cancelled unless I was there. After that we had an xpen for her and hubby would go to play golf and put a puppy pad in the xpen. If she needed to pee, she used the pad. We quickly found out that the need for a poo made her climb out of her pen to do so on the kitchen tile! She would not poo on the pad. So even though she could climb out of the pen she only did when nature called. Now, at 7 months old she can usually wait until hubby gets home to go outside and has not used the pad in ages. She has climbed out once in the last month though to poo. When I get home for the weekend I still cannot bring myself to play golf, I spend the time with her.
We both cannot believe how much we love her. She is so sweet and loving.
I think if you can take a week vacation when you get her (two if possible) it would really help to set the stage for the basics.
Pam

I'm so confused now as to what to do. I want whats best for the pup more than anything. At the same time I always wanted a dog, some one to come home to from work, some one to keep me company on long walks, some one to bring to the park at the weekends, some one to keep me company when my boyfriend is at work on Friday and Saturday nights (he is a DJ partime along with having his own full time job) - My boyfriend would love the same too. He had a dog when he lived at home with his parents, but the dog unfortunately died. He doesn't think its fair to leave a dog at home while we work, thats why I decided to research this to see how other people do it.

The opinion of people seems to be divided though, some saying the dog would get used to it's routine of being at home during the day while we work, while others are saying it would be detremental to the dogs personality and over all welfare.

:-( Hmmm I don't know what to do? Unless, when we go looking for our pup, the breeder is able to tell us what we should do, and maybe sell us a pup from the litter that she thinks would most likely suit out situation - Im sure the breeder would be able to tell these things from experience?

Justine
19th April 2007, 12:43 PM
ella and i went out the other day ,huuby was in england i new i would be gone for at least 10 hours so what i did i phoned my local vets and they took alfs in he had a sleep over.it wasnt ideal but hes only ever been left up to 2 hrs at a time,so i had a nice relaxing day knowing he was safe and being walked.mind you alfs was not impressed when he got home i was ignored for most of the day.

Jen
19th April 2007, 12:49 PM
I'm so confused now as to what to do. I want whats best for the pup more than anything. At the same time I always wanted a dog, some one to come home to from work, some one to keep me company on long walks, some one to bring to the park at the weekends, some one to keep me company when my boyfriend is at work on Friday and Saturday nights (he is a DJ partime along with having his own full time job) - My boyfriend would love the same too. He had a dog when he lived at home with his parents, but the dog unfortunately died. He doesn't think its fair to leave a dog at home while we work, thats why I decided to research this to see how other people do it.

The opinion of people seems to be divided though, some saying the dog would get used to it's routine of being at home during the day while we work, while others are saying it would be detremental to the dogs personality and over all welfare.

:-( Hmmm I don't know what to do? Unless, when we go looking for our pup, the breeder is able to tell us what we should do, and maybe sell us a pup from the litter that she thinks would most likely suit out situation - Im sure the breeder would be able to tell these things from experience?

If you make arrangements for dog walker to stop in a few times a day until the pup is potty trained, then you can then cut the service back to once a day and add in a few days of daycare, and I think you'll be fine as long as you're sure to make the most of the time you have with them--training, exercise, etc. Getting up earlier than normal to spend time with them and possibly adjusting your work schedule for the first few months--can you come home at lunch, can you work 7-8 hours instead of 10 (work the rest at home), etc. etc. ? Just some additional situations to think about. Once the pup is older, adding another will help a lot, as they're pack animals. I wouldn't suggest getting two at once though.

sassy.pips
19th April 2007, 12:59 PM
If you make arrangements for dog walker to stop in a few times a day until the pup is potty trained, then you can then cut the service back to once a day and add in a few days of daycare, and I think you'll be fine as long as you're sure to make the most of the time you have with them--training, exercise, etc. Getting up earlier than normal to spend time with them and possibly adjusting your work schedule for the first few months--can you come home at lunch, can you work 7-8 hours instead of 10 (work the rest at home), etc. etc. ? Just some additional situations to think about. Once the pup is older, adding another will help a lot, as they're pack animals. I wouldn't suggest getting two at once though.

I live in Ireland and we don't have dogy daycare services :-( Maybe thats a nich in the market that I could look into setting my own one up? lol :-D But I could look into dog walkers, I'm sure there are people that do this. I'll look up my local newspaper or maybe place an ad if I do get my pup to see if there are any responsible people out there that would do this.

casshon
19th April 2007, 02:39 PM
There are lots of dog walking services (use google). It is an expensive option though and a lot of them are already full up with dogs so you might need to book in advance. Alternatively, you could put an ad up for a local teenager/retired person to look in on the pup for you during the day.

I changed my working hours so I can get home earlier and I'm also lucky that my family is so dog friendly and we can share the responsiblity if someone has to work late/go out.

As was said earlier it is almost always better if there is more than 1 dog.

yvonne
19th April 2007, 02:54 PM
Hi Guys.
My situation was as follows:
Got holly in January last year. Both myself and OH worked. He was always on shifts, so one of us was there most of the time. Holly was only ever left for 3 hours max alone. Myself and OH split up 5 months later and i moved in with my brother. Thankfully over the summer. I had to leave Holly in the back garden and my mum would usually call around lunch to play with her. A girl up the road was given a side gate key and would let herself in and take holly for an hour or two.
Coming up to sept/oct i would cry the whole way to work knowing that my baby was left out in the back garden. (brother wouldn't let her stay in, as open plan with all new furniture). I know she had a warm kennel etc, but it was heartbreaking. So, decided to move back to my old house where i knew i could keep her inside. Got flyers typed up and was going to get a walker from the estate.
Thankfully, one morning walking holly in the lashing rain (has to be done) i met Bernie who lives around the corner. Bernie had changed her life round since she got buster (blenheim and hollys cousins). She gave up working during the week and worked at night and the weekend. (not easy with a family), - she was so devoted to giving her time to Buster.
She offered to go into my house every day before lunch and bring holly round to hers to play with Buster for the day. She is there all day, so this was the best news i'd heard in months. It suits me so well.
A few months on and Holly stills goes to Busters house to play every day. Bernie's delighted because Buster's got a new best friend and i'm delighted as i'm not worrying about her every day.
If you could sort out something like this - it's the best solution for me.

I'm not too sure where you're living in ireland, but i'm in celbridge if you ever need a hand with your pup. i.e. taking it overnight if you're going away.
All the best
Yvonne

Barbara Nixon
19th April 2007, 02:55 PM
The big problem would be the time when the puppy is too young to walk and needs someone there to spot when it needs to toilet. Otherwise it will not learn what is required.

Briland
19th April 2007, 07:24 PM
We have had Helmsley for three weeks now, and are still in the housebreaking process, and I expect we will be for a while.

When we have to leave, we take him with us, which he loves, or we leave him in his playpen, but the max he has been left alone is three hours. (We work from home and live on a horse farm).

Between the housebreaking and his personality I cannot imagine him being left all day. I know it would have affected the housebreaking - he needs to go outside every hour during the day - and his socialization, as he is very much a "people-dog."

BTW, he is 12 weeks old.

Hope this helps.

Jen
19th April 2007, 07:41 PM
We have had Helmsley for three weeks now, and are still in the housebreaking process, and I expect we will be for a while.

When we have to leave, we take him with us, which he loves, or we leave him in his playpen, but the max he has been left alone is three hours. (We work from home and live on a horse farm).

Between the housebreaking and his personality I cannot imagine him being left all day. I know it would have affected the housebreaking - he needs to go outside every hour during the day - and his socialization, as he is very much a "people-dog."

BTW, he is 12 weeks old.

Hope this helps.

Gus was 8 weeks old when we got him. The general rule that we read in various books was a pup should be able to hold it two hours longer the number of months old--so at 2 months old, he should have been able to hold it 4 hours...and he was able to. He was in an x-pen with a small kennel inside it acting as a den with lots of toys and things to keep him busy. I'd play with him in the morning, go to work, the dog walker would come 4 hours later, feed him, let them out, play with them, and then we would be home 3.5 hours later. He had only two accidents in his pen; it didn't affect his potty training at all.

Donna27
19th April 2007, 08:19 PM
Ok, I'm going to join into this conversation too, since it was a huge issue we had to deal with when we got Fiona.

My story is: I have loved this breed since I was about 14. One of my close friend's parents had two beautiful blenheims during highschool, and it started my love of Cavaliers. My boyfriend Kevin and I decided we wanted to take our relationship to the next level and get a puppy. I just graduated college last year, and while Kevin and I are still very young (in our early 20s), we knew that between us we wanted a dog, a cav ideally, and we would make it work. Since the beginning, Fiona's wellbeing was our PRIORITY. Unfortunately, I do have to work full time (darn those college loans!), but Kevin's schedule is more flexible. We knew the responsibility getting into it, and it was something we were willing to make sacrifices for.

What we did, which was imperative, is we waited for a good and logical time to get her. My job at the time was ending, and I took the opportunity of being between jobs to take time off with Fiona. We got Fiona at almost 10 weeks old, and for the first 3 weeks she was home, I was with her almost all day. Kevin only works 5-10 mins from home, so he was able to come home at lunch almost every day and play, if I was gone. Once I started working again, Kevin came home 1-2 times a day to play with her. Our set up was to have an X-Pen in our kitchen, with her crate, water, a few safe toys, and her potty pad. It has worked out fine. Fiona is a well adjusted, loving, family member of ours. From the very beginning, Fiona did not like being crate trained, which is why we went with an X-Pen set up.

I will say that the negatives of our set up is that potty training has been MUCH harder. While I was able to take her outside all the time those first few weeks, we then had to continue training her to go on her potty pad, and now that she's older, the transitiion to going outside has been very d ifficult. We dont have a fenced off back yard, so we coulndt have a doggy door or anything, so that has been more difficult.

I agree with what was said earlier completely, the emotional attachment a Cavalier brings is unlike anything I'd ever expect. I truly love Fiona like a daughter I hope to have someday, and nondog owners often dont get it. Fiona and I were cuddling on the couch the other day, and my friend went "gross, stop kissing her, it's a dog". LOL. They jsut dont get it. That being said, I think it is great you are doing research first. I truly wish that I could be home with her all day every day, but a lot of us do have to work full time. Only you can really judge if you have the time, committment, and motivation to make getting a puppy work. Our advice on this board will tell you competely different sides of things, and that is why it is simply advice. For me personally, I love the cavalier breed, and that was what I wanted. If you are looking for a dog to fit your life, like others said you might want to look into more indendant breeds. If you do decide to go with a Cavalier, make sure you go through a reputable breeder though :).

Good luck with your search!

molly
19th April 2007, 08:58 PM
The common thread for people who work or stay home is that each loving responsible dog owner makes the necessary sacrifices to put the dog's needs ahead of their own. Reliable doggie day care, dog walkers and/or friends and family who can assist by giving the dog quality time during the time you need to work is so vital to a happy healthy dog.

We currently have 2 cavaliers who were "thrown away" by their owners. One we got as a 1.5 yr. old when a new baby joined 2 other siblings in the family and the mother had no more time for the dog. The other is an 8 mos. old pup who was turned into a kill shelter when the working couple decided that they wanted to sleep late on weekends, not tend to a dog. They were also sick of the dog "going" in the house (not his fault). He came to us scared of people and totally untrained. He is working hard at housebreaking and wants so hard to please. He will be a really good dog and has made alot of great progress in just the short 2 weeks he has been here but he has a long way to go.

So whether you are at home or work, I hope you will have a viable solid plan that will work long term for your pet before you get one. They require alot of love and time and training for their happiness and yours. My daughter and her family love dogs so much that they won't have one because they know their life style doesn't allow for the time a dog needs. They have a cat that they adopted from the shelter when she was 3 yrs. old.:D

PamH
19th April 2007, 11:52 PM
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:-( Hmmm I don't know what to do? Unless, when we go looking for our pup, the breeder is able to tell us what we should do, and maybe sell us a pup from the litter that she thinks would most likely suit out situation - Im sure the breeder would be able to tell these things from experience?[/QUOTE]

I can tell you from personal experience that before we got Maddy we had a yorkie. We both worked at that time. We would leave at 7:30am and sometimes not get home until 7pm. He had free run of the house. When he was young, our daughter got home from school at 3pm and let him out. So he was older when he was actually left the full time.
Anyway, he spent a lot of the day barking at everyone that passed by. He was bored. When we got home he jumped at us and demanded attention.
At the time we said we should never have got him, it was not fair to him. But he was part of our family and we did not feel we should just give him up.
On weekends we wanted to play golf, go out to dinner etc. We felt so guilty!
We went away a lot. We put him in kennels. For the last two years of his life my husband was retired and he finally had what he wanted all along.
With Maddy she has had the attention and time from day one. We don't go away because I am working away all week so we stay put. I know it makes a difference. Yes, you can dedicate your time to them after work. But be prepared for guilt when you don't come home at night and stay home. Be prepared for guilt when you leave them on a weekend day after they have been alone during the week. This is just my opinion. But I do think you should think about it very carefully and decide what you will be prepared to give up. Of course you can do it. Just know what you are letting yourself in for. I wish you the best of luck in whatever choice you make. If you decide to get a cav you will definitely find support here.
Pam

cooper&fergus
20th April 2007, 02:23 AM
I think what a lot of people are saying is right. People who work fulltime can definitely be loving cavie owners. You just need to make a few adjustments and be committed to sorting out a situation which is best for the dog.

My hubby and I both worked fulltime when we started our cavie family. When we first got Fergus I was working days and hubby working nights. He had someone with him all the time. And for the first year of his life with hubbys shift work he was never alone for more than about 3-4 hours which worked well.

When we both were doing days we enlisted the help of my parents who are semi retired to look after him. Then we got Cooper last year and we were either home with him initially or they were with my parents. When there were 2 of them they had each other as companions and we felt a little more comfortable leaving them alone togther. They have a doggie door into a very secure yard so we have no accidents. However we still made sure that they went to my parents regularly so they didn't have too much time alone.

It's funny, on weekdays when hubby leaves for work they settle themselves on their beds and don't make a fuss at all. But if we dare to leave for even 20 mins on a evening or weekend they are not happy. It's like they know workdays they have some alone time, but any other time is all about them..which is pretty much true. We'd rather spend the weekends playing with our boys than going out.

PamH
20th April 2007, 11:31 AM
It's funny, on weekdays when hubby leaves for work they settle themselves on their beds and don't make a fuss at all. But if we dare to leave for even 20 mins on a evening or weekend they are not happy. It's like they know workdays they have some alone time, but any other time is all about them..which is pretty much true. We'd rather spend the weekends playing with our boys than going out.


That is so true! Our yorkie would sit and watch us leave on a weekday with no complaint. On an evening or weekend though he ran to the door with us and barked at us. It's as if he knew "suits=I can't go" but jeans = I should be going.