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View Full Version : End of neutering? New dog contraceptive



Karlin
13th July 2007, 02:08 AM
From New Scientist:


Male dogs can breathe a sigh of relief. The days of removing their testicles
to stop them breeding or to curb aggressive behaviour may be numbered. A
contraceptive implant that halts testosterone and sperm
production for months at a time is expected to gain European approval within
weeks, while steps are being taken to enable the drug to be sold in the US.

Both egg and sperm production are controlled by the release of sex hormones
from the pituitary gland, which is in turn controlled by gonadotrophin
releasing hormone (GnRH).

The implant, developed by Peptech in Macquarie Park, Australia, contains a
drug called deslorelin or Suprelorin, which binds to GnRH receptors and
overstimulates them so that they become desensitised to the hormone. As well as
making the dogs temporarily infertile, deslorelin blocks
testosterone production, curtailing aggressive behaviour. "It's reversible,"
says Katie Yeates of Peptech. "It gives you the option of breeding later."

A six-month implant was launched in Australia in late 2004, where it costs
between AUS$60 and AU$90 a dose ($52 to $77). Peptech recently launched a
12-month implant and is now developing similar implants for
cats and female dogs.

David McDowell, veterinary consultant for the UK's Royal Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, says while oral contraceptives have been used
in female cats for years, long-term use may stimulate breast
tumours or uterus infections. Although the new implants work through a
different mechanism, he fears similar side effects may be associated with
long-term use in dogs. "Provided owners use them within the
manufacturers' guidelines, we would welcome the new drug," he says.
"However, if dog owners don't want to use their pet for breeding, we believe
neutering is the best option."

The European Medicines Agency recommended in March that the European
Commission authorise the marketing of Suprelorin later this month.

Last week, Daniela Braga of the Assisted Fertilization Center in Sao Paolo,
Brazil, and colleagues told a meeting of the European Society for Human
Reproduction and Embryology in Lyon, France, that they have used the drug as an alternative to surgical sterilisation in female cattle and to time their
pregnancies for when pastures are available.

Barbara Nixon
13th July 2007, 11:37 AM
On beginning to read this, my thoughts were like those of the RSPCA officer.

Bruce H
13th July 2007, 12:57 PM
I'm kind of (a lot?) conservative. I'll let someone else try this out and see how it holds up to the test of time.

Karlin
13th July 2007, 01:13 PM
I think most pet owners would be unwilling to pay so much every year for something that is reversible too. A neuter would be the price of a year's supply, and it lasts a lifetime. I can see that some might want to have something reversible -- eg a professional breeder -- but for those who simply want contraception without the hormone decline you can do a vasectomy anyway.

Barbara Nixon
13th July 2007, 06:06 PM
I don't think a breeder would want to risk damaging the dogs' potency by using chemicals.

WoodHaven
13th July 2007, 06:12 PM
I don't think a breeder would want to risk damaging the dogs' potency by using chemicals.

I think this is why Bruce (and me too) are taking a wait and see attitude. I am glad I never use that proheart 6 heartworm protection that my vet was so gung ho for.

Caraline
14th July 2007, 02:23 AM
Oh goodey, so now our dogs too can suffer the side effects of having their hormones messed about. The Pill, HRT... they all have their price to pay & I am wondering why this will be any different. Nah, I don't think I'll be inflicting any of this onto my boys. :mad:

Cathryn
14th July 2007, 11:45 AM
I think this is why Bruce (and me too) are taking a wait and see attitude. I am glad I never use that proheart 6 heartworm protection that my vet was so gung ho for.


You can add me to that list as well Sandy! Let others iron out the kinks before I risk my girls' fertility, I have had enough disasters lately without bringing about any more that could be prevented.

Harry & Heidi's mom
14th July 2007, 09:51 PM
if you don't want to breed then having a dog castrated is the better option IMHO, as it also prevents testicular cancer!