PDA

View Full Version : Question about how your Cavaliers spend their days



lb0024
18th July 2007, 11:39 PM
Hello all,

I wanted to ask you all how your pups spend their days. I am guilt-ridden that Molly has to stay home alone all day, 5 days per week, while I'm at work. Granted, I knew this before getting her, but she's my first dog (as an adult) and I thought she would be fine. But now that I actually have my living, breathing, little angel, I feel that the arrangement I thought would work (half hour walks during the middle of the day) might not be sufficient after all. I don't want to give her up for anything, but I want her to have the best life she possibly can.

My plan was also to take her to doggie daycare 2 days per week, but she hates riding in the car so I don't want to put her through that until she has overcome that problem. (We're working on it.)

So I was wondering how many of you are in this same position (working full time), and how you feel about it, how you think you Cavalier feels about it and has fared, etc. I'd appreciate any thoughts, advice, etc. that you can provide. :(

Oh, one other thing... now that she is house broken, I have an Xpen hooked to her crate and leave her a few toys and treats and water. She does willingly go into the xpen when I leave every morning, so it doesn't seem like she minds this arrangement. Believe me, I can TELL that she hates riding in the car (sad eyes, flattening herself to the floor so I can't pick her up, etc.).

Thanks,
-laura

brid kenny
19th July 2007, 12:00 AM
Hi,
I am a teacher so I don't work as long as others. I leave the house at 8.30 and I'm home around 4 to 4.30.
She sleeps the entire day and I know she's happy because she's still in the chair when I get home. I still would prefer if I was with her all of the time but that is not practical It's good that I have a lot of holidays!! She stays inside in the kitchen and is snug as a bug in a rug ,in great comfort so that's better then what some poor dogs are subjected to.
So I hope that helps and gives you some hope and comfort.
Brid

Holly
19th July 2007, 12:23 AM
I know how you feel---I used to feel like that when I first got Oliver. Im a teacher, too, so my days arent too long. I just gave him plenty of attention and long walks--quality time- when I was there so eventually I didnt feel too badly leaving him.

He is 2 and a half and I just got him a new brother today!

Karlin
19th July 2007, 01:24 AM
I think it sounds like you have set up a good arrangement that works around your working lfe. Getting her to daycare two days a week will really be nice for her. An animal companion is even better, maybe something to consider for the future. When homing rescues I prefer to home where there will be another dog if people work all day. But I'd be happy as well with the arrangement you have, as a second best option. :) A second dog won't work for many people, for many reasons.

On the driving -- she should either be harnessed to a seatbelt with a specially designed dog safety harness, or be in a crate, never loose (it sounds like she may be loose?). Many dogs are scared because they can move around and see out and this makes them anxious. Most dogs are most comfortable in a crate that is seatbelted in so that it can't be thrown forward in a collision. This gives maximum protection and also many emergency serices will not attempt to rescue a loose dog but will remove a dog in a crate (for safety, write the dog's name, your number, and your vet's contact details on the crate in permanent ink). If she is loose, she can be hurled at many times the speed of the car into the windscreen, seatback, or into a person with serious or fatal results for all involved. If she is in the front she risks being injured or killed by an airbag, same as babies or toddlers. So safety should be paramount, and you can use the safety plus of a crate to help with her fear of the car.

If she is still afraid inside a crate on the back seat, lightly drape a towel or sheet over the crate to block her view. Try not feeding her before a journey as well. A dark sheet is even better as dim light is calming.

Also, put on a classical station and resist the temptation to fuss over her or make soothing noises -- this just reinforces her fear by suggesting to her that you too are fearful, f drives are stressful, and that you both need consolation. Instead, talk to her cheerfully if you want or just let the music play, which will blur out the road noises and pay no attention to her (dogs can pick up on your anxiety). :thmbsup:

I am sure you can get her right into daycare by transporting her in a crate. I transport rescue dogs this way all the time and many have never been in a car. At worse they may whine or bark but ignore that and it usually stops after a bit. Classical music is an excellent soother for animals. :)

anniespeeps
19th July 2007, 01:36 AM
I completely understand your feelings of guilt about leaving Molly for an extended period of time, because we've had the same feelings about Annie. It's not an ideal situation to leave a dog by herself all day, but sometimes it can't be avoided due to our busy lives.

Annie generally spends most of the day in her "House" (wire kennel with a comfy bed inside). Fortunately my office is very close to home, so I generally come home every day at lunch to let her out and play with her a little. There have been days, however, when I'm not able to get home and she has to spend most of the day in there. With the girls home from school for the summer, it's not as much of an issue.

For a while I set up a webcam to watch her during the day. She pretty much sleeps all day. And she seems to like her comfy house. So we don't worry as much about leaving her alone anymore.

Caraline
19th July 2007, 02:24 AM
My answer to this is "have more than one dog". I know it isn't practical for everyone, but decades ago, having seen the pleasure that 2 dogs have together I made the decision that I would never again have only 1 dog.

Cathy Moon
19th July 2007, 02:37 AM
My three are in a large kitchen with baby gates during the day. One of us has always come home at lunch time to take them out in the back yard/garden to play - now my sister does. There are french doors from the kitchen to outside, so they can watch birds, bunnies, and squirrels. They are always asleep when I come home.

lb0024
19th July 2007, 08:51 AM
On the driving -- she should either be harnessed to a seatbelt with a specially designed dog safety harness, or be in a crate, never loose (it sounds like she may be loose?).

Oh, no... she is never loose. Always harnassed! :)


Many dogs are scared because they can move around and see out and this makes them anxious.

She cannot see out, actually, because the seat is too low (or the window is too high!?)... I thought being able to see out might actually help so I put her on a couple of pillows, but she still can barely see out. I think she is more comfy on the pillows, though. :D


Most dogs are most comfortable in a crate that is seatbelted in so that it can't be thrown forward in a collision... So safety should be paramount, and you can use the safety plus of a crate to help with her fear of the car.... Try not feeding her before a journey as well. A dark sheet is even better as dim light is calming.

She has ridden in a crate (seatbelted in)... that was a while ago, but she still got car sick. I never feed her before taking her in the car. For the longer trips, I might try the crate again with your suggestion of a dark sheet, but not sure how realistic that is when you just want to take a ride to Petco or the dog park that's 5 minutes away...?


At worse they may whine or bark but ignore that and it usually stops after a bit. Classical music is an excellent soother for animals. :)

She never whines or barks (thank goodness) but I might try classical music instead of country for a change. I know there are some people who get sick just listening to country music. :)


I did a search online for car sickness and found a lot of pages that say pretty much what this one says:
http://www.kingcounty.gov/safety/AnimalServices/pettips/dogtips/incars.aspx

I have been doing this and it seems to be helping. Before I started this process, Molly would begin salivating as soon as I put her in the car. Now, I'm able to back out of the garage and drive back in after a few minutes. Next step is a ride down the street! ;)

Thank you so much for all the information. It is very much appreciated.
-laura

Kelly
19th July 2007, 09:28 AM
I went through the same "guilty" feelings with leaving Chester in the day time.

He is nearly a year now & definatley knows the routine. When it's time for us to go to work he goes in the kitchen & waits for his little treat. I leave the radio on for him, lots of toys & also his treat ball.

Someone always goes home at lunchtime to let him out & play with him. But most of the time I know he has been sleeping as his treat ball hasnt moved, nor his toys & he hasnt drunk any water. I know he plays around a bit more in the afternoon but even then I am pretty sure he sleeps for the majority of the time. When I get home I can see him jump out of his bed & sit by the gate to make it look like he's been waiting all day!

I dont think the guilty feeling ever goes away, you both just get used to the routine. I know he'd rather have us around all day and I would much prefer to be there but at the moment it's just not possible and as much as I would like to get him a little friend, it's just not the right time.

In the meantime, we spoil him rotten in the evenings & over the weekends.

Justine
19th July 2007, 10:50 AM
i have recently started work,its 2 and half hrs ,5 days a week and i feell guilty for that.I have padlocked the gate and he can go in and out when he pleases,so thats good.But it does pull at the old heart stings.Since going to work though he has done a couple of naughty things,which i am afraid to say i do giggle at,they arnt serios things so he still gets a talking to,for which he has a Mad fit around the house.God i am useless.

shippers
19th July 2007, 11:42 AM
I'm a children's nurse and work full time shifts. I try to work weekends for extra money and because my boyfriend is home at weekends for Sally. I am constantly juggling my shifts around Sally and find late shifts are better too because she's on her own less. It isn't easy though because I don't always want to be working opposite to my boyfriend so once in a while Sally has to be left. She doesn't seem to mind. We leave her plenty of toys and water in the kitchen. When we are with her she's spoiled and walked every day. She's our little baby

Justine
19th July 2007, 12:01 PM
We came back the other morning,Alfs had pulled Ellas paintings down of the wall and shredded them,she was angry,so i told her that he hadnt liked them and she had to do a portrate of him,so she laughed after that.

*Pauline*
19th July 2007, 12:01 PM
I know there are some people who get sick just listening to country music. :)

Haha! :rotfl:

loveisokay
19th July 2007, 12:08 PM
I am with my Aoife most of the time. I work, but since having her, the hours have been inconsistent & usually if not always of an evening. However, last week, me & my OH went to London & I had to leave her behind with my sister for 3/4 days. My sister works full time & my brother is still at school, so she was on her own all day for the first time ever really. She hasn't coped well at all (though they said she was no problem at all). Possibly due to starting her teething at that time too. Since she's been home, she has been absolutely dreadful even if you leave the room for the toilet she barks & whines. Before, she would have perhaps barked once if she was wide awake. I'm worried too because a week on Monday I have a job for a week that is full time with no lunch break etc. She's going to drive the neighbours mad. :confused:

Scouty girl
19th July 2007, 12:46 PM
When Scout first came to live with me she spent a lot of time in her crate. I work fulltime 40 hrs a week. Now my Mom, who lives two houses away, comes over and gets her between 11a and 1p. I leave my house for work around 6a. For the past few weeks I have been leaving her out of the crate in the morning when I go to work and if I have to run out on the weekend. She's been doing really well. She's 15 months old. Only one incident where she 'dug out' my coax cable running from my TV to the computer. I'm not sure how she even knew it was there, It's pushed out of sight. She did chew that, but nothing else so far.

However, I do understand the guilt factor. Just do the best that you can. You give your puppy love, attention, take her for walks, play with her, cuddle with her. Give her good food and keep her safe. That does count for something. Plus if that's her/your routine that's all she knows and thinks is normal. Don't be too hard on yourself.

Lynn
19th July 2007, 12:50 PM
My two have a full time mommy (me) and although it might be PERFECT for them, it's not perfect for me.....I need to find a work at home job. Anyway, even with a full time mom, my two still have a 3 hour nap in the afternoon....and I am quite sure they would be ok if it was a 4 hour nap! So, my guess is that when your Molly is home, she is doing a lot of sleeping. I would think that if she could go to doggie day care a few times a week, & maybe have someone look in on her during the day when she is at home, she will be just fine. Finding a balance is not easy...just do your best & plenty of attention when you're with her.

Moviedust
19th July 2007, 04:01 PM
More tips for car training:

Every now and then, put the dog in the car while it is parked. Give the dog a special treat--something it LOVES and doesn't get. Cooked chicken is a good choice if it isn't part of the dogs daily diet.

Once the dog eats the treat, praise it, and take it out of the car. This way, the dog learns that going in the car is SPECIAL and it likes the idea. It will willingly go in without fear.

You will probably find that as you take your dog to dog-happy places like training classes or daycare, these fun times serve as a reward at the end of the car trip. The dog will associate going in the car with arriving at these wonderful places, and the car anxiety will decrease.

Good luck!

*Pauline*
19th July 2007, 04:35 PM
I've spent all day with Dylan. Today mostly getting twigs off him :neutral:

lb0024
20th July 2007, 10:44 PM
For a while I set up a webcam to watch her during the day. She pretty much sleeps all day. And she seems to like her comfy house. So we don't worry as much about leaving her alone anymore.

Oh! I was thinking of doing the same thing... but I never got around to it (have to go buy the cam). Maybe I still should do it. I'd love to be able to see her any time I want, and know she is (hopefully) content in her "room".

Was it easy to set it all up?

-laura

lb0024
20th July 2007, 10:58 PM
But most of the time I know he has been sleeping as his treat ball hasnt moved, nor his toys & he hasnt drunk any water....
In the meantime, we spoil him rotten in the evenings & over the weekends.

Yeah, when I get home, Molly's toys haven't moved so I know she isn't playing with anything. And sometimes I can hear her get up from her crate so I know she was sleeping. One time, though, I hid two halves of a small milkbone under the blankie in her crate. When I came home, they were gone. So I know her nose didn't stop working... or her mouth. :D I was hoping she enjoyed finding that extra treat.

I do try to spoil her in the evenings and weekends. I have let her chew/destroy my slippers (among other items), go anywhere she wants on her walks, and collect all the items she wants while walking (sticks, pinecones, dunkin' donuts napkins, etc). I feel like if she gets that much joy out of eating my stinky old slippers, it's more important to me to let her do that than being able to keep my feet warm. Ha! (Anyway, I used it as an excuse to buy myself a new pair.)

-laura

lb0024
20th July 2007, 11:05 PM
Thank you all so much for your comments and suggestions. I do feel a little better... and if nothing else, at least I know I'm not alone in this situation.

I'd love to get another Cav both because I LOVE them and so Molly would have company, but right now that's not possible. I'm hoping maybe someday I will be able to (I'll have to win the lottery first! ha!).

-laura

Cathy Moon
20th July 2007, 11:21 PM
I am with my Aoife most of the time. I work, but since having her, the hours have been inconsistent & usually if not always of an evening. However, last week, me & my OH went to London & I had to leave her behind with my sister for 3/4 days. My sister works full time & my brother is still at school, so she was on her own all day for the first time ever really. She hasn't coped well at all (though they said she was no problem at all). Possibly due to starting her teething at that time too. Since she's been home, she has been absolutely dreadful even if you leave the room for the toilet she barks & whines. Before, she would have perhaps barked once if she was wide awake. I'm worried too because a week on Monday I have a job for a week that is full time with no lunch break etc. She's going to drive the neighbours mad. :confused:
Oh dear! It really sounds to me like you might want to read up on Separation Anxiety and put a plan into motion, or it will only get worse. Some dogs become very distraught when left, and there are a series of things you can do to help her before she becomes 'hardwired' for separation anxiety.

loveisokay
21st July 2007, 10:07 AM
That's what I am worried about. She's been left on her own for a few hours here & there & she has no issue sleeping in another room but since coming home from being away, she sometimes gets anxious if I leave so whenever I do, I try do something positive like give her a kong of treats.

Karlin
21st July 2007, 11:21 AM
You will definitely have to have someone in during the day for that week at least once daily to let her out -- she is just too young to be left for huge stretches like this or you could easily end up with a problem dog with severe separation anxiety. There are things you can do (see end of post). Sep. anxiety is THE key reason why this breed does get handed in to rescue (the *number one* reason I get surrendered cavaliers from owners! The boredom and anxiety frequently starts to lead to barking, accidents and destructiveness because the dog is increasingly distressed. They are a breed that really, really need either people at home on and off, or some sort of daytime relief from a wakler and a good interesting environment to stay at home in [eg the things you are doing like kongs], or a dog companion (it doesn't have to be a cavalier or course). At the same tine you don;t want to be accidentally enouraging her dependence; that's why they need gradual training to learn to have some degree of independence and to be left alone. And owners need to learn what to ignore and how to structure such training.

She WILL drive the neighbours crazy if her needs are not cared for -- this is one of the issues of course of having a dog, and especially a more people-dependent breed like a cavalier; they are not like cats who are quiet and tolerate a working home more easily. They are social animals and total isolation for long days can very quickly introduce social and behaviour problems that in turn can cause complaints from neighbours who in turn may take those complaints to dog wardens who do have the right to remove a dog considered a nuisance.

I'd strongly recommend working on all the issues of separation anxiety and training around this, get this dog into regular daycare or have a hired person take her out daily when you cannot be there, or consider a second dog. I know you outlined some things you are doing, but it has to be the daily norm; this plan really needs to be in place before you have the week of solid work much as you'd make arrangements around a young child. :thmbsup: Maybe that is all done and I am just misunderstanding?

I know it is really hard when you love dogs and also must be at work all day, but just as with having a child, accommodation has to be made for this additional responsibility and this almost always will involve some costs.

I have gathered together a range of articles on separation anxiety here that should be of help :) :

http://board.cavaliertalk.com/showthread.php?t=14390

To be honest I'd recommend home-boarding a dog for a week or even kennelling her if no one will be able to come in for a full week of worktime. Maybe someone else with a dog would be willing to take her and then trade off with you for care for their dog at a future point?

sallymum
21st July 2007, 11:34 AM
I am so glad that i dont have any of these probs. I only work a couple of hrs over weekend and the kids and OH is there. Even when i go shopping someone is in my house.

Emma n Renco
21st July 2007, 11:35 AM
We also have the same situation, luckily Renco comes home at lunch to go for a walk with Harvey. But about a month ago we invested in an X pen leaving him with toys and water and Harvey is fine. I think we cav lovers think that they are as sensitive as us as they are so so cute, but as I get frequently told, they are animals and although they love attention they do not require company every minute of the day (as much as they would prefer it :-) ) I think you are doing everything right for you pup and don't worry too much. We are going to get an older rescue cav in about 6 months when we move to a house rather than in our little apartment so that Harvey has company on his alone days. Don't worry too much, although I am a fine one to talk. You can make up for alone time by lots of playing in the park and walks... :-)

loveisokay
21st July 2007, 03:32 PM
You will definitely have to have someone in during the day for that week at least once daily to let her out -- she is just too young to be left for huge stretches like this or you could easily end up with a problem dog with severe separation anxiety. There are things you can do (see end of post). Sep. anxiety is THE key reason why this breed does get handed in to rescue (the *number one* reason I get surrendered cavaliers from owners! The boredom and anxiety frequently starts to lead to barking, accidents and destructiveness because the dog is increasingly distressed. They are a breed that really, really need either people at home on and off, or some sort of daytime relief from a wakler and a good interesting environment to stay at home in [eg the things you are doing like kongs], or a dog companion (it doesn't have to be a cavalier or course). At the same tine you don;t want to be accidentally enouraging her dependence; that's why they need gradual training to learn to have some degree of independence and to be left alone. And owners need to learn what to ignore and how to structure such training.

She WILL drive the neighbours crazy if her needs are not cared for -- this is one of the issues of course of having a dog, and especially a more people-dependent breed like a cavalier; they are not like cats who are quiet and tolerate a working home more easily. They are social animals and total isolation for long days can very quickly introduce social and behaviour problems that in turn can cause complaints from neighbours who in turn may take those complaints to dog wardens who do have the right to remove a dog considered a nuisance.

I'd strongly recommend working on all the issues of separation anxiety and training around this, get this dog into regular daycare or have a hired person take her out daily when you cannot be there, or consider a second dog. I know you outlined some things you are doing, but it has to be the daily norm; this plan really needs to be in place before you have the week of solid work much as you'd make arrangements around a young child. :thmbsup: Maybe that is all done and I am just misunderstanding?

I know it is really hard when you love dogs and also must be at work all day, but just as with having a child, accommodation has to be made for this additional responsibility and this almost always will involve some costs.

I have gathered together a range of articles on separation anxiety here that should be of help :) :

http://board.cavaliertalk.com/showthread.php?t=14390

To be honest I'd recommend home-boarding a dog for a week or even kennelling her if no one will be able to come in for a full week of worktime. Maybe someone else with a dog would be willing to take her and then trade off with you for care for their dog at a future point?

Thank you for all that information. The problem is that I went away to London for a few days & left her in the care of the only person I know that could or would care for her at all whilst I was away but she works full time. I had little option when it came to that (the trip was for business reasons & has made money very tight for everyone this month). Before that, she was okay. I have a job where the shifts are upto 4 hours long four times a week - usually weeknights though occassionally afternoons. She was absolutely content with this. But it's been since coming home from this break she's started showing any signs of any anxiety. I have options for her in the one week of full time work I am doing & will work around these options, but I am also looking for ways to make her more independent & less bored. She isn't always bad when I leave the room - she's usually very good, she's just showing more signs that concern me than before I went away for a couple of nights. An example is how this week I went to the cinema to see a film, I left her with a kong & nice things inside. When I came home, I found her paper all torn up (she is being paper/litter trained for apartment living). Clearly she had gotten bored after the kong in the two hours I was out! That's the only time she has ever done that to my knowledge..

Cathy Moon
21st July 2007, 05:36 PM
When India was a puppy, she was starting to show signs of separation anxiety. Our dog trainer gave us lots of information and ideas like Karlin has done, and it really helped. We had to ignore her for 15 minutes whenever we returned home from being away, and we had to leave her a stuffed kong and a biscuit holder kong when we left. Everything that had to do with coming and going had to be very low key, so as to keep her calm and relaxed.

I would recommend finding a very good boarding kennel, and try having her stay for one night now and then to get used to it. Then when you have to travel, she will know the place and know that you returned to her. Also, she won't be on her own - she'll see, smell and hear lots of dogs, even though they're all in separated runs, and it won't be lonely and boring for her.

loveisokay
21st July 2007, 05:41 PM
Has anyone any links to info on kongs - fillers & types? I swear I must be doing something wrong. She goes mental for them (runs in her crate & waits for it) & is bored after about five minutes.

Cathy Moon
21st July 2007, 06:10 PM
The Kong 'stuff a ball' treat dispenser is nice because you can put their regular kibble in it, and then they roll it around to get the food out. My cavs LOVE this kong the best!
http://www.kongcompany.com/worlds_best.html

Go to the treat dispenser page, and click on more a few times, you'll see a flying saucer shaped treat dispenser that holds puppy dog biscuits. My puppies loved these too.

I would say leave 3 different kong toys with her, and she can keep switching between them if she gets bored.

loveisokay
21st July 2007, 06:21 PM
Oh. Thank you, I didn't know there was more than one shaped kong! I'll look into this as something to cure her boredom whilst I'm at work.

Cathy Moon
21st July 2007, 07:01 PM
I can't remember how old your dog is, loveisokay, but if she is still a little puppy, you shouldn't try the kennel idea yet. Most kennels have an age requirement, but I can't remember what it is. We were fortunate, the lady who owned the kennel kept (puppy) India in her house in a crate and took her out to potty and play at least 9 times per day. Plus the owner's dogs were in the house and are well socialized to visitors.

loveisokay
21st July 2007, 07:18 PM
She's coming up to five months so she is still quite young. I wasn't thinking of trying out any ideas of sending her to kennels for a while. I don't plan to be away for a long time (can't afford to!) & my mum has offered to care for her then (she was away when I had to go to London).

At the moment, I am trying to reassure her about her crate/den & getting her more used to the idea of lying in it on her own without me next to her. She's doing okay with me in the room, :rah: .

Donna27
21st July 2007, 07:27 PM
I only just saw this post and thought I'd give my two sense as well. we are in a very similar situation, both Kevin and I work so Fiona is alone from about 9-4 or 5. Kevin sometimes comes home for lunch since he works close. Luckily, when Fiona was a small puppy I was between jobs and had about a month to spend with her full time. In the beginning we left her in her x-pen all day, with her crate, some toys, and her water. It worked ok, but as she got bigger her pen was just not big enough and she was insane when we got home. We decided to try a few days of leaving her in the living room, because we could tell she was getting bored in her pen. her favorite spot is to sit up on the top of the couch looking out the window, and while many people might not advise doing this, it worked for us. It has made potty training more difficult, but we have had a long process wiht that anyways, and she IS starting to get it. We also leave classical m usic on, and Fiona is doing a lot better having a bigger space to roam around in. We're hopefully going to buy a house next year, so after then we will start thinking about getting a little brother or sister for Fiona, but for now it seems to be workin gok.

momay
28th August 2007, 09:14 PM
Hi Ib0054!
I just read your post (because I live in Salem, MA!).
We also work all day and have worked very hard at providing the best circumstances for our new Tri Cav (Sofee Marie). We have been using a new dog day care provider from Marblehead and they are fantastic. Sofee loves them! She now goes from 8am-2pm every day and they pick her up and bring her home. She is then crated from 2-6pm (I get home at 6), it works out fantastic.
Please let me know if you would like their phone number, send me a private post.
Momay and Sofee Marie

Gracie's Mommy
29th August 2007, 01:37 AM
We are in a very similar situation. I work 8:30-5:30; hubby works 7:30-4:30ish, although his schedule is a bit more flexible than mine right now.


But now that I actually have my living, breathing, little angel, I feel that the arrangement I thought would work (half hour walks during the middle of the day) might not be sufficient after all. I don't want to give her up for anything, but I want her to have the best life she possibly can.

I can totally relate to that statement. It's pretty much exactly how I felt for the first few months after Gracie came home with us. The guilty filling hasn't completely gone away (she's almost a year now)...but, I know that we do all that we can to make sure that she is well loved, exercised and socialized. I come home 2-3 days a week for lunch and we take her to daycare 1-2 days a week. She loves daycare and we love it because she comes home exhausted! :p

I'd definitely recommend finding a way to get her to daycare a day or two a week. You will worry less on the days she's at daycare, too. We're also looking into getting a second Cavalier in the next year or so.

Sounds like you're doing great things for Molly...try not to beat yourself up! :thmbsup:

Charleen
29th August 2007, 01:44 AM
I highly recommend doggy daycare too. I have done it for all of my dogs and especially for a puppy. They get plenty of attention and socialization and they are tired and night. You know they are well taken care of and you don't have guilt.

You just have to work out poor Molly's problems about riding in a car. Poor girl.

My dog, Jolly is now 14 months old. From the time I got him at 4 months old through 13 months old, he went to daycare every day I was at work. Now that he is much more reliable in the house and won't trash it while I am away, he now goes to daycare 3 days a week. Now I do daycare, because he just loves to play with all his little puppy friends. On the days he is home, if my parents are not around, I have a friend who stops in during the day and makes sure that Jolly isn't getting into any trouble at home.

The 3 other dogs, get to go to daycare once a week and they enjoy it too.

Good luck with Molly!