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Jen
24th September 2007, 03:34 PM
This weekend we're watching our friend Holly's dog, Jaspar. http://board.cavaliertalk.com/showthread.php?t=20228

He's been over numerous times, is a perfect playmate for both Abbey and Gus, except for the fact that he marks...in the house! We haven't dealt with this before...what, if anything can be done to prevent this?! What causes it?? He was fixed at 1.5 years, I'm assuming this has something to do with it?? Gus hasn't done this before, inside anyway, and we can't have Jaspar marking all over the entire 3 days he'll be with us. :eek:

Karlin
24th September 2007, 03:42 PM
It often happens with visiting males, even if neutered -- he is marking because Gus is there in particular, I'd guess! You'll mainly need to keep a close eye on him -- you can also put him in a belly band. But after the first day the need to make his 'statements' will probably decrease quite a bit. When I have fostered males I always find day one to be the day they feel they must try to mark. Some boys are just like this and need to be watched all the time. I would try to keep him confined to areas where it isn;t going to matter -- eg kitchen -- then keep him on a lead in areas like the living room. Def doscourage the behaviour though too with a sharp NO or "Ahhh!"

PS Some of the behaviour may be anxiety because he's on his own without his 'people'...?

Also see http://board.cavaliertalk.com/showthread.php?p=223504

WoodHaven
24th September 2007, 03:44 PM
To protect your home-- I'd use a bellyband.
Males mark to mark what is theirs. It is really gross when they decide to "claim" another dog-- ewwww:eek:

Karlin
24th September 2007, 03:48 PM
I had Leo pee on my foot once while wearing a sandal -- not sure if he was claiming the shoe, me, or got distracted while aiming... :lol:. He's a bit of a sloppy boy. :rolleyes: I was standing there and suddenly my foot felt warm...:grnyuk:

Cathy T
24th September 2007, 03:52 PM
Leo just wanted to be sure everyone knew you were his! :D

I'd get a belly band for him. I don't think you'll have enough time to really train him and it sounds like you are more interested in protecting the house. That's how I am when I have visitors. Gryffin, our foster diabetic boy, was going to be staying with me for a few days. He's marked at my house several times and last time at the beach....he marked my beach bag! I bought a couple of belly bands to use when he comes over. He didn't end up staying with us.....but I think the bands will come in handy for visitors.

Jen
24th September 2007, 04:33 PM
Leo just wanted to be sure everyone knew you were his! :D

I'd get a belly band for him. I don't think you'll have enough time to really train him and it sounds like you are more interested in protecting the house. That's how I am when I have visitors. Gryffin, our foster diabetic boy, was going to be staying with me for a few days. He's marked at my house several times and last time at the beach....he marked my beach bag! I bought a couple of belly bands to use when he comes over. He didn't end up staying with us.....but I think the bands will come in handy for visitors.

Holly has been training him, but so far there haven't been great results in this area. Is it even something that you can really break, though?
I think I'll suggest the belly band route, at least while he's with us.

Karlin
24th September 2007, 05:42 PM
Yes yu can definitely train a dog to stop and it uually isn't that hard, but needs the same sort of dedication as regular housetraining.

See:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2284

And


Marking Behavior
Boredom, lack of exercise, and being unaltered are usually the cause of this problem. DON"T PUNISH this
behavior. It is quite fixable using a three-prong approach - management, "no free lunch" reinforcement and "the
wrap" described at the end. As in all training, the success is directly proportionate to the handler's commitment
to following through in all three areas consistently.
During the retraining period:
Management:
1. Don't allow the dog to be free without supervision for a second. He should be attached to someone in the
house for the next month. Other wise the dog should be in a crate or put outside if he has a kennel. The dog
should not be outside, free, and unsupervised. [When in the house, car, or crate the dog should also be wearing
the "wrap"*.]
2. Neuter the dog. Whether a pet dog or working dog, he doesn't need these extra hormones running thoughout
his body providing distraction. (If breeding him is a very important consideration, then try all the management
suggestions first or have Vet freeze some sperm for later use.)
"No Free Lunch"
The handler should put the dog on a "no free lunch" program combined with exercise. Have the handler
measure out the dog's entire day's food ration each morning and then feed that daily ration in two ways:
1. Some of this food (about 1/2 of the day's ration) goes into a buster cube. Give the dog the food filled
buster cube at his regular mealtimes if you wish. The buster cube uses energy and staves off
boredom, challenges the dog to think and makes eating something he earns.
2. Use the rest of the day's ration as the reinforcement for games of cooperation (retrieve, obedience,
scent work, etc.) and for anytime the dog urinates outside. Be sure to reinforce with food and praise
appropriate urination.
3. Play games that exercise,reinforce cooperation, and eliminate boredom. Play the two-toy game with
the dog (see bottom for description). Use cooperative play as a reinforcement for all good behavior.
Reinforce the wanted behavior with food and if possible also jackpot with cooperative play which
will also help exercise the dog.
In other words put the dog on a "no free lunch program". He has to earn every mouthful of food and attention.
This is not a punishment to the dog. Working for something is what your dog wants. This is actually the
cornerstone of a strong reinforcement relationship between handler and dog.
The Wrap:
When the dog is in the house, vehicle or crate he will be wearing "the wrap". You make the wrap by securing a
piece of toweling around the dog's middle covering his sheath/penis. The wrap is only removed when the dog is
anyplace where it is appropriate for him to urinate. To make the wrap, take a small towel cut lengthwise in half
and wrap around dog's waist/groin area once or twice if you can). Then use Vet wrap to secure into place.
(VET Wrap sticks to its self and works really well, it's cheap and can be bought through your vet or any Tack
Shop.)
Only take the wrap off when dog needs to relieve himself. If the dog does mark with the wrap on he
will soon realize that he isn't getting anywhere, and is only peeing on himself. Replace toweling but allow dog
to live with soiled wrap for a little while. I have many clients who have used this method and the behavior
usually goes away within a few weeks. It might look funny, but it sends a big message to the dog and even
working dogs can wear it while they work. If anyone asked what happened just say he has a Bum Hockey.
Two-toy retrieve game: Use atleast two or three identical toys that your dog likes (kong, tennis ball, hose
pieces). Stand in the middle of an open area. Tease your dog and throw one toy for the dog to chase. Just as
the dog picks it up, make an attention getting noise and wave another identical toy in the air and run away from
your dog. As soon as your dog comes toward you, stop running but continue to show your toy. As your dog
approaches throw the toy you have in the exact opposite direction you threw the first toy. As your dog runs by
you to get the newly thrown toy, pick up the toy he dropped. Repeat the above. Your goal is to keep your dog
on a run the whole game, and eventually if you time it right, he will be dropping one toy right at your feet as he
races off for the newly tossed toy. The game is a win-win for both dog and handler. It is a wonderful way to
exercise your dog, teach a retrieve and out without ever forcing the dog to let go of a toy. By having other
identical toys, the only way the dog can get the toy is to give up the toy.
Copyright Ganley / Lyon 2000

http://deesdogs.com/documents/marking%20_2.pdf

Jen
24th September 2007, 08:32 PM
Excellent advice, thanks so much! I'll pass this on for Holly.

Caraline
26th September 2007, 10:11 AM
Yeah what everyone else said. My answer to this would be to put a bellyband on the offender.