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View Full Version : Update on lil pipes' seizures.



aperfectsonnettt
22nd November 2007, 05:09 AM
Today we had another one.. Almost one hundred percent positive this is Episodic Falling (www.episodicfalling.com) which basically means i have to learn to be okay with this and I don't even see how thats possible. It BREAKS MY HEART to watch this happen to her... I don't see much use in the emergency vet so i will wait until Friday morning and make an appointment at the vet.. How can i learn to watch this?! Today when it happened i just sat outside in the doggie area and cried and cried and kept telling her it was okay. I know i have only had her for just over two weeks but it still hurt. Both times now it has happened when i have come home as Episodes usually take place from excitement or exercise and let me tell you, Piper is the happiest and most hyper little puppy ever. The difference in Pipers episodes and the others' on the site and forum is that it seems to really scare her as she is laying in my lap shaking (the way they do when they are scared or cold and its plenty warm in the house) Im sure its just cause she is so young yet (fifteen weeks) but the site says they get used to them in time and sort of phase them out.

Anyway, just venting. thanks for being around or i don't know who i would be venting to. probably some stranger on the street!! (kidding)

lady and amber
22nd November 2007, 10:27 AM
I`m so sorry, your little pup has this, I find that when Amber has an episode its better for her if I pick her up and hold her that way she cant hurt herself. you may have to make some changes so that she wont get so excited or stressed, that way you can limit how many episodes she has, only very short walks as walking too far can bring the episodes on. I have had Amber just over three years and it still upsets me when she has an episode the fear in her face is awful to see, you can pm me if you need any one to talk too. Lynne

Cathryn
22nd November 2007, 11:18 AM
Oh I am so very sorry to hear this, my heart really goes out to you and your precious baby :hug: :flwr: I wish I could offer more practical advice but have never come across this condition so can't sadly. I think the best thing really is to cuddle her and let her feel comforted through your love when she does have an episode, security and love go a long way towards to making something horrid vanish from your mind! Thinking of you both :lotsaluv: :hug:

Claire L
22nd November 2007, 07:11 PM
:hug:Oh that must be so heartbreaking for you to watch :hug: I'm so sorry little Piper has to go through this :( As others have said; maybe by holding her close to you during an episode, she will find it reassuring and PG as she gets older it will be less stressful on you both.

:hug:

Elaine 2
23rd November 2007, 12:33 AM
Ive never heard about this before I'm so sorry little Piper has it, I'm sending you both a hug

Ruth
23rd November 2007, 01:06 AM
Hi, sorry to read about Piper it must be distressing for you both.

If it helps at all, I have had two dogs with EF and learned to live with it and what caused it.
Both my dogs are ruby, the first one had his first attack when four months old. He had been running around with other puppies on a hot day and suddenly started to stagger and look wild eyed. He fell over and his limbs stuck out stiff and straight, his eyes had recognition but were just staring. We thought that attack may have been due to low blood sugar and in those days EF wasn't really known enough to speak about. Blood tests were negative.
This boy had another three attacks, either connected with the heat or trauma (he ran full speed into my shin and that triggered an attack). His last attack was when he was six years old and thankfully that was his last, he never suffered another one although he lived until he was nearly fourteen.
My second boy had his first attack again on a hot day and he was playfighting with our other young dog. This game went on for quite a while and then it went quiet, when I looked to see why, I recognised he was having an attack. It was classic, staring eyes, stiff legs and falling to one side. He even tried to get a rigid front leg up over his head.
His second attack came outside when playing on the beach with our other boy, they ran full speed into each other, the ruby immediately had an attack. I took him straight to the vet who did blood work on him but it came back negative.
A couple of weeks ago I had to take this boy in for a booster. The vets waiting room was very hot and there were more dogs than usual. My boy was panting and looking apprehensive and bang, straight into an EF attack. This time my vet witnessed it and did lots of tests but they all came back negative.
I just learn to live with it, try and remove him from situations that may trigger it. When it happens I just sit quietly with him, try to keep him cool and soothe him until it passes.
He usually sleeps for a long time after one of these episodes.

Mary
23rd November 2007, 03:00 AM
Yep....my little tri girl had episodes from about 4 months until about 9 months. She is turning 3 in January and has not had another episode since then...so knock on wood it has been a long time. I watch her in very warm weather but otherwise she plays freely with the other pups with no problem. Hope your sweet Piper does well.....

Caraline
23rd November 2007, 04:44 AM
Oh wow, I am so sorry to hear that Piper has this condition. This must have been terribly distressing for you. The feeling of helplessness that you experience when you watch your puppy go through this is profound.


i have to learn to be okay with this and I don't even see how thats possible.

and


How can i learn to watch this?!

As hard as this is to imagine, you will have the strength deal with this. You will probably never feel okay about it, but you will reach a point where you can deal with it calmly & with as much confidence as anybody could under the circumstances.

Though I've not had any experience with EF (& hope not to), one of my Boxers used to have grand mal seizures. Those words you say that I have quoted above, are the exact same words I used to say to myself when my girl started having episodes.

I never did get to feel okay about it, but I did get to the point where I could just sit down with her, and comfort her & wait for the seizure to pass. As awful as this may sound, it was the familiarity that eventually gave me the strength & the calm I needed. It was the knowing how long an episode would probably last, what the different stages were, and what next to expect. I image it is probably a smilar thing with EF.

Strength to you! :hug:

Cathy T
23rd November 2007, 05:11 AM
I can feel your distress through your postings. I am so sorry you are having to deal with this but that website looks like it has some really good information. It may be helpful to join their message board as well since it's looks fairly active. Read through their message (like you've done on this board) and I bet you'll learn a lot. The most encouraging thing I read is that it is almost never life threatening. I am glad you have a few people on this board who can share their experiences with you and give you some guidance on how to handle her condition.

Please be strong for your girl. I know how hard this. Comfort her through her seizures. Hopefully they will decrease or perhaps cease altogether....it sounds like other have had this experience.

Again, I am just sorry you are having to deal with this and want you to know we are here for you.

aperfectsonnettt
23rd November 2007, 05:12 AM
I don't know that it is okay to say I'm glad I'm not alone because I'm really not glad as I don't wish this upon any dog or dog owner.. However, I do feel better knowing there are other people out there. I'm hoping this is something she will maybe grow out of as she gets less excited to see me. (ha!) It's just that the two episodes she has had were directly upon being released from her kennel and outside to potty. I try and not make a big deal about me coming home or her going outside because i guess thats all i can do. I have read that these happen with heat as well. I live in North Dakota and its nowhere near hot out in November! maybe it has something to do with being inside then going directly outside. I don't know. At this point I am basically clueless.

We'll get through this. There is really no other way.

I guess i just wanted to say thanks for the support and any further information or stories about EF, i would LOVE to hear.

Lynn
23rd November 2007, 12:16 PM
I don't have any advice, just sending hugs to you and Piper and I hope that she doesn't continue to have any more episodes. I'm so glad you have CavalierTalk to come to for support as I am sure this is ripping at your heart.

BarbMazz
23rd November 2007, 06:41 PM
Perhaps it would help to journal the things you remember her doing just prior to an attack? Sometimes doing that can help a pattern emerge that would help you recognize when an episode may happen.

I think I understand how you're feeling; when my daughter was 18 months old she began having febrile seizures. I felt very apprehensive after the first one; I just did NOT want it to happen again but of course I felt powerless to stop them. Our pediatrician had me journal, and it got to the point where I could prevent them from happening with certain steps.

I'm sure you'll never feel "comfortable" with these episodes, but while you won't get used to them you'll begin to recognize what works best for Pippa's comfort. There will be some comfort for you, too, when you see that you can result in her feeling safe and taken care of.

Hugs to you both :hug::hug::hug:

aperfectsonnettt
24th November 2007, 05:37 AM
[QUOTE=BarbMazz;236467]Perhaps it would help to journal the things you remember her doing just prior to an attack? Sometimes doing that can help a pattern emerge that would help you recognize when an episode may happen.

So far both times are exactly the same... What i would assume is the excitement of being let out of her kennel and going outside... I will definately keep a journal from here on out. Thanks for the good idea and also for the support. Im so sorry to hear about your daughter. That must have been AWFUL.

aperfectsonnettt
24th November 2007, 05:38 AM
Not sure why that ^ quoted funny.

BarbMazz
25th November 2007, 01:56 AM
[quote=BarbMazz;236467]Perhaps it would help to journal the things you remember her doing just prior to an attack? Sometimes doing that can help a pattern emerge that would help you recognize when an episode may happen.

So far both times are exactly the same... What i would assume is the excitement of being let out of her kennel and going outside... I will definately keep a journal from here on out. Thanks for the good idea and also for the support. Im so sorry to hear about your daughter. That must have been AWFUL.

I have to admit it WAS awful, but she did outgrow them after about a year; the first one occured when she came down with Roseola and her fever spiked very, very quickly. However, now she's 22 and very, very healthy and none the worse for wear.

You're welcome for the idea! I've since used that method for many things in my life and it sure is effective... it's funny how a person's memory works, and the journal illustrates that when you "think" you remember exactly what happened and go back to see what you wrote at that time... many times what you remember happening is different than what actually did.

I'd further suggest you try to notice nuance sort of things; body posture, what her eyes were doing, how she was holding her tail, head, whatever. Note if she's eaten or had anything to drink. Outside, inside? Sleep patterns for the last day or so. If you notice a certain look in her eye, etc.. making note of those things really helps you focus on the tiny stuff that turn out to be the best indicators! I've found that my mind then stored that stuff and I noticed when things were just the tiniest bit "off". With my daughter it was a certain look in her eye, and the coloration around her mouth.. a bit of shadow under her eyes. After a while I "just knew" she needed preventative medicine.

aperfectsonnettt
26th November 2007, 07:04 AM
Once again, thanks for the FANTASTIC advice as i will for sure be using it.

Also, Love your quote. Garth Brooks right?!

Cathy T
26th November 2007, 05:01 PM
Also, Love your quote. Garth Brooks right?!

I love that one as well, yep, classic Garth!!