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View Full Version : Chicken Allergies.....



Dublin
14th April 2008, 02:08 PM
...... I am assuming that Sparky has a chicken allergy now & have just bought him some JWB Lamb & Rice Puppy. Then will see if he gets on better with that than the 2 chicken based foods we've had.

Just wondering if any of you with Cav's with chicken allergies can give your dogs turkey? I know it's still poultry but would it throw up the same allergy?

Bobby
14th April 2008, 02:29 PM
Dublin, I don't think there's a hard and fast rule for all cavs. I know Bobby is sensitive to chicken but I've also realised that he has a very delicate stomach in general. If he eats too much in one go he gets very smelly, and certain treats don't agree with him as well. I can also feed him in the AM, take him in the car for 10 mins in the afternoon and he will throw up.

Yesterday I've started to introduce a new dry food to him which contains a very minute amount of chicken in it and this does not bother him so far. I don't think he's truly allergic to chicken but he can't eat pure chicken. So if I were you, I'd get sparky's tummy settled first for a few weeks on a diet which you know that works. Once you've that sorted I'd test him with a tiny amount of turkey and see does that agree.

Karlin
14th April 2008, 02:41 PM
If you have a dog that seems sensitive to an ingredient, why try to introduce it in other forms? :confused: There are plenty of food and treat options that don't include chicken. :thmbsup: If the dog actually has an intolerance it could actually be a serious problem to keep offering the food in dribs and drabs. If a dog seems to be bothered in any way by a food ingredient, either with any level of intolerance or an allergy, it is really not wise to try and introduce it in other forms. Allergies can build over time so by continuing to feed it it may just make the problem worse over time. A dog could have a total serious crash due to an intolerance -- I have had this happen before with a rescue dog. :eek: Yes you could go back to feeding a dog with an intolerance small bits of the problem food -- but why is taking any risks worth it? The dog I was dealing with spent three days in intensive care on a drip as a likely result of being fed treats of the food in question.

In general though, allergies are actually not that common in dogs. Puppies do have more tummy sensitivity just like small children do. As a general point it makes sense to work with a vet if anyone thinks their dog has an allergy rather than making any assumptions and starting to remove food sources. It generally takes several weeks for a food change to have an affect so if anyone sees an immediate change it probably was just stomach upset due to other causes, not an actual allergy. It is always best to work with a vet on any issue like this. :thmbsup:

Bobby
14th April 2008, 03:29 PM
If you have a dog that seems sensitive to an ingredient, why try to introduce it in other forms? Sorry, don't want to misguide anyone but this was the advice of my vet. (I'm by no means an expert after a mere four weeks as an owner:p). Like humans though, I do believe its impossible to know what dogs are allergic to. Therefore, to figure out if your dog is allergic to turkey, its going to be trial and error. Our vet said that even though our dog was sensitive to chicken it was no harm introducing him to dry food containing minute amounts of it. That was his professional opinion anyways. Good luck with Sparky!

pippa
14th April 2008, 10:21 PM
Dublin, I don't think there's a hard and fast rule for all cavs. I know Bobby is sensitive to chicken but I've also realised that he has a very delicate stomach in general. If he eats too much in one go he gets very smelly, and certain treats don't agree with him as well. I don't think he's truly allergic to chicken but he can't eat pure chicken.



Pippin is much the same..

He did have quite a bad reaction to turkey when someone gave him a tiny piece , way back before we realised his chicken allergy ,but we didn't think it was the turkey at the time we blamed a bit of stuffing that was on the turkey.

As I said in your other thread,Pippin now eats a dry food with poultry in it but not as a main ingredient.

hbmama
15th April 2008, 12:01 AM
My girl can eat anything, switch foods around to prevent boredom, treats, etc. Guess I am very fortunate. Is an allergy problem something that is common in Cavaliers, and can it pop up later? Is it widely inherited? Just curious why so many seem to be sensitive to chicken and some grains. :confused:

Ashley
18th April 2008, 10:01 AM
Holly seems rather sensitive to chicken too - however I only gave her a bit when she was younger... but not gave her any since! Dont feel like she is missing out or anything if i cut it out of her diet. I'm back on JWB Lamb and Rice which is perfect for her. Was feeding her raw... but it meant she was going to the toilet more than with the JWB, which wasnt good if we were out and put her in her crate!! Im sure you can imagine!!! :eek:

Nicki
19th April 2008, 11:35 AM
Sorry, don't want to misguide anyone but this was the advice of my vet. (I'm by no means an expert after a mere four weeks as an owner:p). Like humans though, I do believe its impossible to know what dogs are allergic to. Therefore, to figure out if your dog is allergic to turkey, its going to be trial and error. Our vet said that even though our dog was sensitive to chicken it was no harm introducing him to dry food containing minute amounts of it. That was his professional opinion anyways. Good luck with Sparky!


Don't forget that most vets have very limited training or knowledge with regard to nutrition - and most of what they do have comes from visits to the vet school by the big names, such as Hills...who also give free dog food to vet students etc...

I just would not stress a puppy's system by giving him something I know he's already had a reaction too - they can have such delicate tummies. Stick to what he is comfortable with.


hbmama - many Cavaliers just seem to have sensitive digestions, some are very sensitive to chicken especially.

hbmama
20th April 2008, 07:55 PM
Thanks Nicki. So far so good. No evidence of allergies to anything yet, and Dottie gets a little chicken or Merricks canned once or twice a week to spice up her dry food. I will watch her closely, but guess we are just fortunate so far. It does seem like alot of Cavaliers have sensitive tummys on here though. Hope things don't change.

sins
20th April 2008, 08:51 PM
Never assume that pet food companies differentiate between chicken and turkey.Chances are that food labelled as chicken may contain turkey and vice versa.
At least with a premium hypoallergenic dog food which does not list any poultry in it's ingredients you'll be very much better off.
Sins

Karlin
20th April 2008, 09:28 PM
If a dog is allergic to a food, there's no point in ever reintroducing it unless you are trying to verify whether the dog is actually allergic to that ingredient and this is under experienced medical supervision by a vet who knows how to treat allergies. Otherwise I would consider this a pretty bizarre thing to do -- would anyone try and probe how much peanut or fish it takes to cause a reaction in a child known to be allergic to peanuts or fish? Surely this would be seen as at best, cruel and extremely uncomfortable for the child, and at worst, potentially fatally risky. So why do this with a dog?

It often is fairly easy to find out what causes allergies -- elimination diets are widely used -- but they do take time. A week or two isn't long enough.

I think most supposed allergies are simply sensitive digestions that seem to settle themselves within the first year of a puppy's life. This board is full of people who had puppies with tummy problems, all of which went away by the time the dog was one. If the problem is chronic and uncomfortable for the dog then it is worth taking the time and effort to really check properly for allergies. Chicken is in all sorts of dogs foods and treats so it really requires vigilance to remove it from the diet; same for grains. I wouldn't be concerned about poultry sources in a reputable food, but cheaper foods that might say they are a 'flavour' often have two or three meat sources listed in the small print or something vague like 'poultry meal' or 'meat derivatives.' I always look for named protein sources.