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View Full Version : Congrgulations Mr President Obama



Brian M
5th November 2008, 08:23 AM
Hi

Congratulations to President Obama and all our American cousins of whatever political view , he seems an amazing man and what an awe inspiring speech by him and Senator McCain was very gracious in defeat.Hopefully once again America can lead the world from the front into a better future for us all. :)

pippa
5th November 2008, 09:07 AM
Well said Brian!

ice-cavi
5th November 2008, 09:20 AM
:rah:

Karlin
5th November 2008, 10:37 AM
It is an historic day! I just heard the two speeches (as I went to bed before them!!) and each was gracious towards his former rival. It has been an exhausting campaign for everybody I think, both all the candidates in the primaries through to the presidential contenders and all of us Americans! At least I had the advantage of not having to listen to endless political ads. :lol: On the other hand, I wrote my column for this Friday's paper --- which had to be filed yesterday -- based on the assumption that Obama had won so if he hadn't, I'd be in trouble! :)

amanda L
5th November 2008, 10:52 AM
:rah:Mr President Obama:rah::rah:

Mary
5th November 2008, 11:17 AM
It is certainly a great day in American history!!!:rah:

Cathy Moon
5th November 2008, 11:45 AM
The American people have spoken loudly and clearly! :rah: :rah::rah::rah::rah::rah:

brotymo
5th November 2008, 12:34 PM
Lets just hope he is as effective in deed as he is in word. His lack of experience is matters of foreign relations and his relative newness to politics concerns me. What, also, does he know of the average American's daily plight? His life has never been what the average American's life it. Frankly, I am disappointed that our country could do no better, in a country of 300 million people, than either of the nominees.

Frankly, I think it was time for change, but I am not sure what we have gotten is going to be what we need. I am not at all certain we even know what we have gotten, other than the fact that he is the first minority president. And why we keep focusing on that is also a question I have. Shouldn't that be something we look BEYOND? Instead, it is still a big factor in this election. I wonder how many voters voted based on his skin color (for OR against) versus his qualifications? I am sure the number is high. That would be a mistake. We should be looking beyond skin color in this election. If American's could not SEE the candidates they were voting for, and only read their qualifications and heard their speeches, how differently would people have voted? But none of that matters now.

Well, that was just my opinion, and I don't reallly think it matters much to anyone, if it matters at all, but I just wanted to say what was on my mind.

Sumilidon
5th November 2008, 01:17 PM
Problem with that Brotymo is that you know that come the time for the first address of the nation, Fozzy Bear would be sitting behind the desk as nobody saw his skin colour. :D

brotymo
5th November 2008, 01:39 PM
Problem with that Brotymo is that you know that come the time for the first address of the nation, Fozzy Bear would be sitting behind the desk as nobody saw his skin colour. :D


My point is, skin color should be no more of a factor than hair color. that doesn't influence our vote, and neither should race. I know we have become accustomed to seeing our candidates, but not too far back in our nation's history, most American's never saw their candidates. They simply read their speeches in the papers. Unless they were rich enough to travel and go see the candidates during their "front porch campaign", they never saw them.

I just felt both parties had strange choices of candidates to represent them (McCain, too much a Bush clone and Obama, lacking experience majorly) and either way we voted wasn't really that great a choice.

I will be interested to see what all this means for me as your average, struggling American. I sure hope Obama picks a team of very wise advisors to help him deal with our economy. If it gets much worse, I don't want to think about what that will do to most folks like me.

redhare
5th November 2008, 01:51 PM
I am so excited that Obama won! I feel he will do great things for our country and for our international relations. How many days 'til 1/20/09?:D

Daisy's Mom
5th November 2008, 02:14 PM
Frankly, I think it was time for change, but I am not sure what we have gotten is going to be what we need. I am not at all certain we even know what we have gotten


Amen. I hope very badly that I'm wrong about him. So many unanswered questions, so much information swept under the rug by the media about this guy's past and affiliations. Talk about jumping from the frying pan into the fire just in the name of change .... His "changes" are exactly what keep me up at night. Thank goodness for the balance of power set up by our insightful forefathers in the Constitution!

WoodHaven
5th November 2008, 02:22 PM
As an Illinois resident-- I have the same fears as Daisys Mom and Brotymo-- voting present doesn't really do it for "change". And being 6.25% black -- isn't really a reason to (or not to) vote for someone.

JeanKC
5th November 2008, 02:29 PM
It's mister president-ELECT for a couple months still.

He won fair and square, and I'd hope that most of us that might've voted for somebody else will at least give him a chance now that it's over. :)

brotymo
5th November 2008, 02:44 PM
It's mister president-ELECT for a couple months still.

He won fair and square, and I'd hope that most of us that might've voted for somebody else will at least give him a chance now that it's over. :)

Well, we can either do that or find another country to live in, can't we? I am not quite up for THAT radical a move just yet.

The popular vote does illustrate better how much closer the vote was than the electoral college makes it appear. I do wish this country would go with the popular vote and ditch the electoral college.

chloe92us
5th November 2008, 02:52 PM
I think the media is playing up the racial angle, but the white people that voted for him thought nothing of race when voting.

I personally like his calm demeanor and he seems very straight-forward and honest. That will take him a long way in earning respect of those surrounding him, with politicians, world leaders, and the public (obviously). We'll see how it plays out.

In my opinion, McCain's downfall was in his VP candidate. I don't think a mother of 5, with a 6 mo (with Downs) should have a job as demanding as a VP. To uproot those young children and take them to DC seems like a bad idea. Okay, lash me now! :eek: It is not that I don't think a woman could serve that position, I DO! (I so wanted Hillary to be Pres) but one with such young children, no I do not.

Karlin
5th November 2008, 03:24 PM
Whatever about leaving now, many of us have gladly lived outside the US during a period when someone we were ashamed of represented our country. :cool:

The colour of skin or gender should indeed be irrelevent. But the history of most countries shows that skin colour and gender has long been relevent -- it is just if one is of any of the groups running things, it isn't very obvious as one isn't seeing the status quo as a colour or gender issue. :) In general, everywhere in the west, white males are vastly over-represented in proportion to the actual colour make-up of the nation. Or the university. Or the corporate management structure. Or conferences. Or judging panels. I just looked at the list of about 8 judges for a major industry event here and amazingly not a woman amongst them even though off the top of my head I could have created a 50/50 panel of very qualified people to do the job. How odd that whoever created the panel failed to notice its makeup! Or tried to make it more diverse and representative of the makeup of the businesses it will seek to award...

Actually I think if most people in the US voted on the basis of race in yesterday's election, Obama would never have been elected. :p


Unless they were rich enough to travel and go see the candidates during their "front porch campaign", they never saw them.

I actually would disagree -- if anything, more people in the past would have physically seen candidates than ever happens now. The campaign train and stump speeches in thousands of cities and towns was the norm for a campaign, and masses of people showed up to hear those talks from all walks of life -- the same in the UK for MP races and in Ireland, when hundreds of thousands gathered to hear Daniel O'Connell for example. Far more people in the 1930s listened to an entire presidential speech from FDR weekly on the radio than I would wager listened to a full speech by any candidate ever, in the era of television. This has long been the era of small soundbites.

In Ireland our candidates and representatives still do a lot of door to door visits. I have had the former prime minister on my street many times. :lol: With his ONE bodyguard. And last week Enda Kenny (opposition leader) came up behind me to say hello to the dogs which startled us all (for many rasons! :lol: ! If anything maybe we see our politicians toooo much... :rotfl:

Cathy T
5th November 2008, 03:34 PM
Actually I think if most people in the US voted on the basis of race in yesterday's election, Obama would never have been elected. :razz:



I most definitely did not vote for him based on race......I would hope there were many others who weren't ignorant enough to base a vote on race. I voted for him because I felt he was the best candidate.

Race most definitely does play into this.....but I feel in a positive way. I think it's amazing how far we have come as a country in the past 40 years to actually have had a serious contender who was female and one who was black. That is huge!!! And I am hopeful that over the next decade it won't be considered a huge accomplishment to have a female or black run for the highest office in the country.....it will be the norm.

brotymo
5th November 2008, 06:37 PM
Everyone here certainly has valid points and varied opinions, and everyone comes to those opinions based upon their experience, education, livelihood, etc. They all have merit. We all feel strongly about our beliefs, or we wouldn't be so passionate about this election.

I respect all of you on here, and it is interesting what everyone has to say. I guess the longer conversation would be WHY everyone believes as they do.

I make it a point to not argue religion or politics...they are arguments noone wins! (all you have to do it look at the presidential debates...depending upon who you ask, the victory went both ways).
You can never make a person change their mind about politics or religion unless you do so in a way that they are convinced the change was their own idea. It takes a pretty clever person to do that!

I am happy to live in a country where we can vote for our leaders, say what we feel, and live free. I hope Americans don't lose their appreciation for that freedom in favor of bigger government to take care of them. Some words for thought:

If a nation values anything more than freedom, it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is that if it is comfort or money that it values more, it will lose that too.
~ Somerset Maugham

On another note, I am happy that I have a place to come (Cavalier Talk!) where I can forget about the world for a little while. If we all could just live as happy and "in the moment" as our cavs, wouldn't life be easy?

Daisy's Mom
5th November 2008, 07:58 PM
If a nation values anything more than freedom, it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is that if it is comfort or money that it values more, it will lose that too.
~ Somerset Maugham



That is a great quote, and mirrors my feelings about a lot of what is going on in our country today, and in this election. I heard a similar quote recently that I thought was very apropos:

It (a Democracy) can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising the most benefits from the public treasury with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy, always followed by a dictatorship. (Author unknown.)

That sentiment expresses a lot of what scares me about Obama. Of course, not everyone voted for him hoping for personal gain provided by the government, but many millions did, IMO, and that makes me angry , scared, and very, very sad about the country my kids will inhabit in the future, perhaps after I'm gone.

KingstonsMom
5th November 2008, 08:27 PM
Uh oh, someone opened up a can of worms with this thread! ;) I was a die-hard Hillary supporter and reluctantly became a die-hard Obama supporter. However, the one thing that bothers me is the constant description of Obama as a "black" president. Isn't he just as equally a "white" president? Is it not inherently racist to label someone "black" when only a partial percentage of their heritage is actually African-American?

anniespeeps
5th November 2008, 08:28 PM
No matter how you feel about Obama, everyone's missing the most important thing he said during his acceptance speech. He promised his daughters a puppy if he won. We should be lobbying for a Cavalier in the White House! Reagan had one, and it's time to bring another Cavalier to Washington. There's a platform I believe we can all support!

Love my Cavaliers
5th November 2008, 08:54 PM
First of all, I am an Obama supporter and I am thrilled that he won the election. Unfortunately for John McCain, I lost respect for him when he chose Palin as his running mate. Although she had disastrous interviews with Charlie Gibson and Katie Couric, she improved dramatically during the campaign and she learned quickly.

The reason I have no respect for her (and for McCain - because he chose her) is that while she promotes herself as pro-life, I felt that she displayed a cavalier attitude towards the life and health of her son Trig. She knew she was carrying a child with Down Syndrome, a condition which can cause immediate feeding difficiulties, approximately half have congenital heart defects, and many have gastro-intestinal defects also. However, when her water broke at least one month early and she was in the lower 48 states, she continued her conference, flew home to Juneau, and then went to Wasilia to give birth. Babies born prematurely, with or without Down syndrome, need a neonatologist present at the birth, and no obstetrician in his/her right mind would tell her to stay in the lower 48 and get home when she could. Most women who are carrying full-term pregnancies are told to come to the hospital soon after their water breaks regardless of whether they are having contractions. Women who will be delivering preterm are told to get to a hospital immediately for the safety of their baby. Trig may have had cardiac or respiratory difficulties at birth that required intensive care. IMO she is lucky that she made it to Alaska and that he was born without distress. She may have developed an infection or Trig may not have been able to withstand the stress of labor and either died in utero or suffered profound oxygen deprivation.

I am a labor and delivery nurse who happens to believe that home birth is safe for the vast majority of women giving birth. And I've been at many home births and am absolutely awed at the power of birth and the beauty of it. However, for the birth of a baby with diagnosed Down syndrome, particularly delivering prematurely, I believe that the hospital with intensive care facilities is the safest place for the baby. Now I know that Palin delivered in a hospital, but I think she (and the doctor she said she called after her water broke) showed incredibly poor judgement regarding the life and health of her son. That factor made me question her judgements in general (and McCain's in choosing her) and I felt that I would not want her running my government.

I truly hope I have not offended anyone. That certainly is not my intent. I just had to get this off my chest because it's been bothering me for a while.

Cathy Moon
6th November 2008, 12:36 AM
Uh oh, someone opened up a can of worms with this thread! ;) I was a die-hard Hillary supporter and reluctantly became a die-hard Obama supporter. However, the one thing that bothers me is the constant description of Obama as a "black" president. Isn't he just as equally a "white" president? Is it not inherently racist to label someone "black" when only a partial percentage of their heritage is actually African-American?
Usually I don't speak up about politics, as it is such a sensitive subject. However, I feel a strong need to voice my opinion. I agree with you, and I'm glad you brought this topic up! I was a die-hard Hilary supporter as well. When I voted for Obama, it had absolutely nothing to do with race - it was because I am a liberal. I never forget that our next president could be selecting Supreme Court judges during the next 1-2 terms, etc.

Years ago I took an African-American Literature course at a nearby college. The concept of race was discussed in class, and I suddenly found it so odd to learn about how white people have considered a person to be black no matter what percent of each race they actually are. This literally turned a lightbulb on over my head!

I prefer to think of people as being mixed heritage; for example I am Finnish, German, English, Irish, etc. If someone is Indonesian, African, English, why can't we just say mixed heritage? I so much want America to move forward in its belief system!

Last night after Obama won, I had wished the topic of race wasn't such a big deal on the news - he is foremost representing a political party, and was chosen by the Democratic party, I might add! On the other hand, I can see why it was a big deal from many citizens' point of view. It was a historic moment. I think President-elect Obama has a different world view, and that's what we need. This is a global economy; we are becoming citizens of the world.

Karlin
6th November 2008, 12:41 AM
Isn't he just as equally a "white" president?

Did you see Doonesbury today? A group of soldiers are watching the election returns and one cheers for Obama and a few moments later turns to the others and says: "He's half white, you know."

:rotfl:

Karlin
6th November 2008, 12:42 AM
http://images.ucomics.com/comics/db/2008/db081105.gif

Cathy Moon
6th November 2008, 12:50 AM
:lol: Perfect!!!!!!

arasara
6th November 2008, 01:25 AM
LOL that is perfect!!

Love my cavaliers ~ that's cool that you're a L&D nurse! I'm currently in my second year of RN school *boy oh boy is there lots of work!* ;)

I also feel the same about Palin being chose a running mate. If something were to happen to McCain, I would not feel the least bit comfortable with Palin being president. That alone is enough to push me over the edge.

I am glad that this board has been able to discuss politics tastefully ~ that's great to see.

And yes I remember about the Obama puppy.. Cavalier in the white house, I'm all for it! ;)

Cathy Moon
6th November 2008, 01:51 AM
We should start sending letters to the Obamas regarding Cavaliers! Seriously, a cavalier would be the perfect, gentle pet for them!

Ronald and Nancy Reagan had a cavalier named Rex. Let's get a cavalier into the Whitehouse in January!:thmbsup:

Maggles
6th November 2008, 02:16 AM
Our cavalier LOVES Barack Obama:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8VImkueflQ

Cathy Moon
6th November 2008, 02:32 AM
Our cavalier LOVES Barack Obama:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8VImkueflQ
cl*p:rotfl:

KingstonsMom
6th November 2008, 03:22 AM
LOL, love the cartoon! I'd love to see a Cavalier in the White House, but I truly hope that whatever type of puppy they get will come from a rescue organization. It would be a great message to put out there. Not to mention, Obama's buddy Oprah would be all over that.

Cathy T
6th November 2008, 03:48 AM
I had wished the topic of race wasn't such a big deal on the news - he is foremost representing a political party, and was chosen by the Democratic party, I might add!


So true Cathy....my vote was based on political affiliation....not race.

Palin as president scared the pants off of me! :eek:

Maggles.....that was priceless!!:)

JeanKC
6th November 2008, 06:44 AM
The reason I have no respect for her (and for McCain - because he chose her) is that while she promotes herself as pro-life, I felt that she displayed a cavalier attitude towards the life and health of her son Trig. She knew she was carrying a child with Down Syndrome, a condition which can cause immediate feeding difficiulties, approximately half have congenital heart defects, and many have gastro-intestinal defects also....

But she decided to continue with the pregnancy instead of terminating it... which to me is a pretty good example of 'walking the walk'.

KC (maybe not Jean)

Love my Cavaliers
6th November 2008, 02:00 PM
Absolutely she "walked the walk" KC. and I commend her for that.

RodRussell
6th November 2008, 06:10 PM
What I am thinking about are the President-Elect's promises and his principles:
---being the most left-wing member of the federal senate;
---take money from the haves and give it to the so-called have-nots (called "spreading the wealth around");
---withdraw from the war on terrorism (Al Queda endorsed him);
---reduce support for Israel and let the Hamas control Jerusalem (Hamas endorsed him);
---bankrupt the U.S. coal industry;
---encourage higher gasoline prices and "skyrocketing" electric power prices;
---support the "right" of pregnant women to kill their young;
---his admitted hatred of white people, which he wrote about in his books;
---encourage illegal aliens to come into the country and vote in elections;
---his admiration of Cuba (Castro endorsed him), of Venezuela (Hugo Chavez endorsed him), and of Communist China (he likes that China's trains run on time and its "infra-structure");
---spend billions on "global warming" (and ignoring that the earth has been cooling for the past ten years);
---and, of course, his friends: a radical who bombed the U.S. Capitol building and still wishes he had bombed more, his minister of twenty years who preaches hatred of white people and claims the Bible says "God d--- America", and his two mentors, one of whom dedicated a book to Satan, and the other of whom dedicated a book to the killer of Robert Kennedy.

sins
6th November 2008, 06:44 PM
I think Hillary would have been the one most Irish people would have been pleased to see as president elect. However Mr Obama will need all the luck and skill in his future task.All the problems that America had when everyone went to bed after election night were still there the morning after.
It's great to see an African American family in the Whitehouse, not so sure about this puppy that the kids are getting though.(publicity stunt??)
I betcha they really wanted an iguana or a chipmunk:p:p:p
Either way, if they really want a puppy the kids should choose it themselves and then do what all kids do.....give it to Mrs O. to look after:rolleyes:
(yes I am a horrid old cynic....guilty)

brotymo
6th November 2008, 06:58 PM
not so sure about this puppy that the kids are getting though.(publicity stunt??)
I betcha they really wanted an iguana or a chipmunk:p:p:p
Either way, if they really want a puppy the kids should choose it themselves and then do what all kids do.....give it to Mrs O. to look after:rolleyes:
(yes I am a horrid old cynic....guilty)


I read an article today where the kids have allergies, and whatever dog they get must be hypoallergenic. I understand they have decided to get a rescue dog, and they are working with PAWS Chicago Adoption Center.
I think it would be great for them to rescue a dog. That would be a great example, and instead of drawing attention to another purebred that then becomes popular and gets overbred due to that publicity, more people will think of rescuing a homeless dog.

sins
6th November 2008, 07:13 PM
That would be a great example, and instead of drawing attention to another purebred that then becomes popular and gets overbred due to that publicity
Goodness yes, that's very important.
Thankfully I can't imagine Michelle Obama as the type to have a Hiltonesque chihuahua in her handbag:-p.
Sins

Justine
6th November 2008, 08:44 PM
Good luck from us too.I got up at 6.30am to see if he had won..

jgponder
6th November 2008, 09:18 PM
Don't you thin it would very unwise to promote a Cavalier in the Whitehouse? I for one do not want to see this breed given any publicity that might spark some of the unsavory breeders to think they can make a lot of money by producing more Cav's that will most likely end up with more health problems due to overbreeding or in shelters because someone tired of it or it they just did not fit in with their lifestyle. I like the fact that they are not on every street corner and in every pet store and hope that this would not happen to this breed. Look what has happened to yellow labs because of Marly, or dalmations because of 101 dalmations or now the chihuahua's due to Paris Hilton and the Beverly Hills movie. Please think before you promote them to get a Cav.

Jane, mom to Alex

Justine
6th November 2008, 09:23 PM
I was watching Fox News and hes thinking of getting a homeless doggie,that would be well cool.

cb2u
7th November 2008, 02:40 AM
If a nation values anything more than freedom, it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is that if it is comfort or money that it values more, it will lose that too.
~ Somerset Maugham


This is an amazing quote!!

I am nervous about what the future will hold for the next four years, and I hope that we don't start going down a socialist-type path. The more power a government has, the less freedom its people have. This quote sums it up so eloquently.

Lani
7th November 2008, 02:45 AM
Don't you thin it would very unwise to promote a Cavalier in the Whitehouse?

Well, there's already been a Cavalier in the White House - Reagan's Cavalier Rex.

That said, I seriously doubt they'll get a Cavalier as the girls have allergies and they are looking for a non-shedding breed.

Brian M
7th November 2008, 01:22 PM
Hi

Presidential Dogs according to MSN Uk

Bush jnr 2 Scotty Terriers Barney and Miss Beazey
Bush snr Springer Spaniel Millie
Clinton Labrador Buddy
Reagans Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (Hurray) Rex
Ford Golden Retreiver Liberty
Nixon American Cocker Spaniel Checkers
L B J 2 Beagles Him and Her
Roosevelt Scotty Terrier Fala
Hoover G S D King Tut
J F K An Awful Lot
10 Dogs /Ponies /Hamsters/Rabbits/Canary/Parakeet

Best Wishes

Brian :thmbsup:

Cathy Moon
8th November 2008, 12:48 AM
Off topic a tiny bit, but I heard on National Public radio that little Barney, one of the Bush's Scottish terriers, who is normally friendly - yesterday he bit a reporter's finger and drew blood. The reporter was reaching out to pet Barney, and Barney snapped at him! The reporter was treated by the White House medical staff. Sounds like little Barney needs a trip to the vet. :flwr:

KingstonsMom
8th November 2008, 02:21 PM
Switching gears again, but what did everyone think of Michelle Obama's dress on election night? She's getting some horrible criticism for it.

JeanKC
8th November 2008, 02:27 PM
Me thinks she's gonna get a lot of criticism, period... comes with the territory. Maybe my memory is shaky, but seems like the only 1st lady in recent history that HAS been treated pretty well by the media is Laura Bush... and maybe Barbara before her. They could've been taking it easy on them because they were so hard on hubby(s). :)

brotymo
8th November 2008, 02:39 PM
Hi

Presidential Dogs according to MSN Uk


J F K An Awful Lot
10 Dogs /Ponies /Hamsters/Rabbits/Canary/Parakeet

Best Wishes

Brian :thmbsup:

Haha, JFK's house sounds like my house...we have hamsters, mice (yep, by choice...but not running around loose in the walls!), dogs, and I am horseless right now, but I owned horses growing up and look forward to being in a position to have them again.