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View Full Version : Leaving dog at the vet!



JenniferP
1st December 2008, 04:00 PM
It's always been my worst nightmare to have to leave my dog at the vet for an op or something, in one of those cages, especially overnight.

A couple of weeks ago my dog Bella had to have some heart tests, they said she'd prob be in for the morning which was bad enough. She's quite a shy dog, a bit scared of other animals and other people if I'm not there. It was awful leaving her there as she looked at me as if to say 'Where are you going?'! I had to have her there by 8am. The vet hadn't phoned by 2.30 so I phoned them, to be told she'd had all her tests but could I pick her up at 5.10 so the vet could chat to me after his surgery!! I arrived at 5, and was still waiting at 5.45. I just wanted her back! Eventually after what was a horrible day of waiting, she was bought back to me with a huge bald patch and so drugged (sedatives) that she didn't seem to recognise me. It took a couple of days for her to get back to her old self.

It really was awful - at least with children you can explain what's happening, but I felt like she'd think I'd abandoned her! And of course most dogs hate the vet anyway; she was shaking and scared before we even went in.

Is it just me who feels like this or is anyone else the same? I would have payed more to bring her in at the time of the tests, waited while they were done, and taken her straight home again! It must be awful for people to have to leave their animals overnight. I could never leave her at a kennel while I went away for a week, I'd be a nervous wreck!

AT
1st December 2008, 04:25 PM
Unfortunatly sometimes they need to stay in the vets & you just have to not think about it too much , just deal with it & get it over with

My dog had 6 operations earler this year , one was a 3 day stay & the others were overnight. aswell as xrays when he stayed the day.

Since he managed to eat I dont think he was really as bothered about being left as he made out .
Then after a few ops he learnt morphine was very nice so he actually wanted to go ;)

Zippy
1st December 2008, 05:12 PM
What better place for a pet if they're not well, need an op or tests??

Animals have ops and treatments every day, at the vets and are perfectly fine.

Please remember that your anxiety isn't the same for the dog/cat/other pet.

We used to leave our dogs at the vets for boarding, they were fine and happy.

We always take comfort in the fact that if they're not fine, the vet will attend to it......it's all how you choose to view it, IMO.

diddy
1st December 2008, 10:40 PM
Jenifer, dont worry too much about having to leave your dog at the vets. Vets always have Nurses. Whilst you are worrying at home the nurses will be excercising, playing with, and cuddling your dog. They have even been known to squabble (frequently) about whose turn it is for a cuddle.


However, it very rare that an owner will ever get to witness this. In cases where their dogs life hangs in the balance, owners who find a nurse sitting on the floor stroking or soothing their dog kind of take it for granted thats because the dog is so sick - not so.!!

AT
1st December 2008, 10:44 PM
They have even been known to squabble (frequently) about whose turn it is for a cuddle.


so.!!

when I collected my boy once the vet went to get him & he was missing from the cage, the nurses had stolen him & were on the floor in the office taking his photo,lol

*Pauline*
1st December 2008, 11:00 PM
Is it just me who feels like this or is anyone else the same?

I was the same when I had to leave Dylan for his MRI. I didn't expect to be told I had to leave Dylan there that very day. I couldn't even understand what the neurologist was saying after she told me. As my friend went to get Dylan's things from the car, I cried to Margaret C, "This is really hard for me, I don't even let anyone else walk Dylan!":(

I came home and the kids were out and I was so distressed I came on CT and Sins chatted to me on MSN and that really helped, thanks Sins :flwr:

I have even decided I'm not going o holiday again unless I can take Dylan.

You are not alone. I do think I am way to anxious and wish I didn't worry so much.

*Pauline*
1st December 2008, 11:03 PM
when I collected my boy once the vet went to get him & he was missing from the cage, the nurses had stolen him & were on the floor in the office taking his photo,lol

I was told Dylan gave so many kisses, they needed tissues on hand all the time!!!

Davy
1st December 2008, 11:38 PM
My yorkie had cushing/diabetes and was very unstable at the beginning of her treatment. She would have to stay in for two to three weeks at a time. It was hell and I would use any excuse to go to the hospital to see her. She hated it at first but soon settle down as she got used to it.

Of course, she was always happy to come home; I still remember my joy of breaking her out of hospital on Christmas Eve so she could spend Christmas day with me, of course, she was back in the hospital on Boxing Day. :(

But if we went back for the an out patients visit I would have to hold while on my lap because as soon as she saw a nurse she knew she would try and jump off my lap to get to them. The nurses would shout ‘oh Dizzy’ and cuddle her, they never did have a clue who I was and to this day there are nurse there who remember Dizzy but still don’t know who I’m am.

SiânE came to me from the same hospital and they all still remember her, me I just happen to be someone who holding on to the end of the lead, I’m lucky if I get a hello from them while they roll on the floor cuddling SiânE :rolleyes:

Pat
2nd December 2008, 01:47 AM
OK, I'll be the lone voice of dissent!! It's not so much that I'm over-anxious, it's more that I'm a control freak!

I will not leave a dog (particularly an elderly dog with a chronic illness such as acquired valvular degeneration) alone at a vet's office for tests as a general rule. I prefer to avoid the stress to the dog and also keep the dog in my direct control whenever possible. I've spent many years cultivating relationships with my GP vet, cardiologist, internist, and other specialists. For routine tests, including echocardiograms and other ultrasounds, blood draws, etc., I'm allowed to be present. It's especially nice because the vet/specialist is able to show and tell me things during the tests so that I can see first-hand what is going on. (For x-rays, I stay outside the door because of exposure to radiation, but my dogs are only away from me for a few minutes.) I'm lucky that I have options - but the practitioners that I use know that I go out of my way to use them because of their policies on allowing me to be present. In return, I go WAY out of my way to be an excellent client (calm, quiet, respectful, thoughtful, don't call for favors unless it is urgent, remember the staff on holidays, etc.) I also refer many new clients to my vets (and I'm a high dollar client because of being a multiple pet owner as well as having fosters that need services). I'm actually permitted to go into surgery (at GP vet's only) which is especially nice, so I arrive with the dog/s just before surgery/dentals, they wake up in my arms, and we leave as soon as the vet is comfortable that all is well. I realize this is extremely unusual and it would be difficult/impossible to get this permission if I ever needed to start over with a new vet.

There of course have been times when my dogs have been hospitalized in 24 hour ER facilities (such as for multi-day IV fluids for kidney failure) and I am not able to stay 24 hours but the staff have been very good about my visiting at any time. (In those cases, I usually do NOT visit frequently because I think it is disruptive to the dog, but I'll frequently stop in and get updates with an attending or a tech without seeing the dog.) I've also had to use a specialist surgeon for major surgery and of course was not allowed into surgery and the dog did require an overnight stay. So of course there are times when separation is mandatory, but not for routine tests.

I do have one important question - WHY was your dog sedated for "routine heart tests"? That is very unusual - I've never had a dog sedated for echos or x-rays or electrocardiograms - 20 some dogs with multiple tests over the years for each dog.

On the subject of testing - I keep a "chart" at home for each of my dogs and have copies of routine blood chemistry tests, copies of reports from cardiologist, lists of medications/dosages, etc. and pretty much keep an exact history for each dog. I also keep x-rays in my home office so that I can take them to appts with specialists, etc. This has been invaluable during times when I've had to rush dogs to the ER facility for some emergency or after-hours treatment. I grab the chart and take it with me and I'm able to present a complete (and verified) history to the practitioner who is often seeing the dog for the first time. You also gain instant respect for being prepared and organized and vet/staff tend to be very responsive about giving information and feedback to you quickly.

Sorry this is so long - this is one of my "hot buttons."

Pat

brotymo
2nd December 2008, 03:36 AM
II have even decided I'm not going o holiday again unless I can take Dylan.




Oh, Pauline, you sound like me. When I make plans to go somewhere, I am always trying to figure out how to accomodate my cavs. The big doggies are fine and I have a wonderful neighbor (two actually) who look after them, but I'd worry sick about my cavvies. They follow me everywhere and they'd be sick with worry (and so would I!) if I had to leave them.

I do NOT like leaving a dog at the vets! I stay when I can, and if they want to keep a dog overnight, just for observation or recovery, I tell them I'd like to observe at home where they will be more calm and I can supervise 24/7 and get them care if need arises. Of course, critical care is different, but that isn't what I am talking about here.

JenniferP
2nd December 2008, 09:42 AM
Phew, glad I'm not alone!

That's made me feel a lot better about the nurses, I thought they were just in a cage all day. My partner's sis is a vet, and we once went to the surgery out of hours to get something, and I saw all the dogs in the cages looking worried! I felt sorry for the owners. They had the radio on all night to try and help calm them with some background noise.

Bella prob had sedation so she'd stay still for the tests or something. That's amazing that you could have such a great relationship with vets and ask to stay with the dog a lot of the time during procedures. I don't think my vet would be so accomodating!

They always take Bella's heart rate at the vet and say it's very high, but of course it is as she's so stressed! When I take it at home it's a lot lower.

WoodHaven
2nd December 2008, 04:50 PM
What better place for a pet if they're not well, need an op or tests??

Animals have ops and treatments every day, at the vets and are perfectly fine.

Please remember that your anxiety isn't the same for the dog/cat/other pet.

We used to leave our dogs at the vets for boarding, they were fine and happy.

We always take comfort in the fact that if they're not fine, the vet will attend to it......it's all how you choose to view it, IMO.

ARE you kidding??? *I* hate going to the vet-- knowing that sick animals will be coming and going all day. Vomit, diarrhea, nasty germs --- wondering if everything got cleaned up with the proper cleaner. Parvo. kennel cough. If my dog already has an issue, I don't want him/her to pick up something else while there. The barking, the howling.

The last dog I boarded (7 year old cocker spaniel who was healthy) refused to eat for 3 whole days. That is anxiety at work. This is why I board all the pups I've placed for FREE. I don't want them overly stressed at a boarding facility or vet office.

JenniferP
2nd December 2008, 05:59 PM
Yes my Dog didn't eat for 3 days either. Some dogs are lucky enough not to be bothered too much by it I suppose, but others are nervous wrecks as soon as they get a whiff of the place.

WoodHaven
2nd December 2008, 06:17 PM
The last really sick dog I saw at the vet has some kind of pneumonia, it had feces literally dripping --- I didn't want my dog (who was there for a rabies shot) to breathe the same air.

Zippy
2nd December 2008, 06:18 PM
No, I'm not kidding.

If an animal requires surgery or is very ill, the vets is the only option, IMO.

As for boarding them, maybe we're just lucky that we have a vet who boards animals in a completely different area.... away from the surgical and sick animals.

I don't take my pets to the vets unless it's absolutely necessary, for all the reasons that you've stated.....but our vets office will not let you into an examination room til they've disinfected it.

Pat has the best idea, but is a very knowledgeable, very experienced dog person. As she states, she also has an unusual relationship with her regular vet and has loads of experience nursing animals back to health.
And, I believe she's the lady with Vet Textbooks for reference...much more knowledgeable than the average pet owner. (NO offense to any pet owners)!

When our Charley has his strokes and MVD, we never left him at the vets.

If he needed 'only' nursing and supportive care, we brought him home and did it ourselves.

Most pet owners do not have either the time (work schedules etc) nor the expertise required. I have a medical background and am home most of the time, so can nurse them back to health myself.

So far, 'the girls' haven't needed much veterinary care and I hope it stays that way....lol.....but if an op was necessary, it would be done and I'd cope quite well.

What I picked up in the original post, was Jennifers' distress about leaving her pup for an operation or tests.......if they 'are' necessary, there aren't a lot of options. IMO

Sandy, it's great that you board your homed pups but not everyone has that option. It's ideal but not always available.

Do you ever board dogs that aren't from your own litters?

Please let me know, seriously..... :)

WoodHaven
2nd December 2008, 06:45 PM
Sorry if that came out harsh. My daughter worked at our vet clinic until she had grandbaby #2 (over 6 years). The stories: the mistakes, the diseases, make the environment less than what I would deem acceptable unless an emergency. My daughter had spoken to other vet techs and they all say the same thing. Sooo, my dogs feet NEVER touch the ground at any vet clinic.

I've spent the last 18 years building a relationship with the doctor. My vet has allowed me in the surgery. I always take my dogs home asap after surgery. That sometimes means giving subQ fluids by myself. It meant tube feeding a tiny puppy in need.

I just had one of my puppy people pick up a dog that I've watched for the last 8 days. He asked me if I could watch Charlie over Christmas too. I've saved them over 1600.00 in the last 20 months. Yes, I've watched friends' dogs, but my daughter watches dogs for 20 USD per day and that includes a bath and grooming if they stay longer than 5 days.

Like Pat, I didn't know there was a heart test that required sedation. My vet cardiologist must do things differently.