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Shivers
3rd February 2009, 02:02 PM
Has anyone ever had to have this done to their Cav? Prince has a recurrent ear problem and we were at the vet again last night and he suggested we get the fur on his ears clipped right back to reduce the weight and it would help keep them clean (we clean his ears daily). He also suggested we get his coat clipped, again for health and hygiene reasons. He has ear mites which Belle has a bit of now (didnt realise they were so contagious). They have both been treated for it now.

I am so stressed out about the whole idea of him having his coat clipped by the vet (or vet nurse will probably do it). Is this normal or would you consider it extreme?

*Pauline*
3rd February 2009, 02:15 PM
You could just do it yourself. That way you do it how you like it. But trimming ears to reduce weight...I've never heard of that icon_nwunsure

sins
3rd February 2009, 02:20 PM
That sounds very extreme to me,but then I don't have a cavalier with very long ears anyway.When I was much younger our gundogs and spaniels sometimes got earmites,there's a product for cleaning ears called canaural which has been on the market for as long as I can remember and is good for cleaning ears.Also regular use of stronghold can prevent infestation.I have heard of people trimming the insides of the ears but I'm not convinced that's effective.My Mum's tri has such long ears that he trips over them sometimes and he's never needed to be trimmed.
I would suggest consulting a professional groomer first and see if they can recommend tips and products.You seem reluctant to have your dog trimmed and really you shouldn't trim if there's not a medical need.

Sins

Shivers
3rd February 2009, 02:27 PM
His ears aren't that long at all and we clean them with canaural daily so we really are trying to do everything we can. They are slightly matted and this is hard to get out because he doesnt like his ears touched a lot.

The vet just said clipping the hair away from the ears will just make them lighter and cooler and easier to clean and then after about 2 weeks his coat will grow back all nice and new and easier to keep. He sold Glen on it but I am not convinced.

He could do with a good grooming but I am just concerned that this could be a bit extreme. I might ring a groomer and see what they say.

casshon
3rd February 2009, 02:42 PM
I don't see why trimming all the ear hair would make much difference but I trim the inside of the ear leathers to allow more air to circulate. If you're doing it yourself just make sure no hair gets down into the ear canal. Good luck and let us know how you get on :)

Daisy's Mom
3rd February 2009, 02:54 PM
A few visits ago, my vet recommended trimming hair off around the ear canal itself (under the ear leather), which I agreed to. They had a groomer onsite who did it. It really doesn't show much until you lift her ears. I don't know if I would do it again, as I don't know if it made much of a difference. She's never had ear problems at all, before or after. But I definitely wouldn't trim the length of his ears because I really don't think that would help much and would definitely have a major impact on his appearance.

ilsamom
3rd February 2009, 03:05 PM
I keep the inside of her ears trimmed, (the groomer does it), as she doesn't stay still when I brush her there and they're always matted otherwise. The groomer does a fine job, and she looks neat and clean.

I'm not sure if it helps anything else but it is helpful for me, and it helps me to get inside her ears to clean them. I also keep her rear clipped to minimize @##$ getting stuck on her.

A good groomer is qualified to do that if your dog is calm for the grooming.

Jen and Ilsa

lorebringer
3rd February 2009, 03:34 PM
I have a working Cocker who had terrible problems with his ears, we were in and out to the vet and still no relief. We tried antibiotics, antifungals, drops, cleaning them - eveything! Eventually we got a swab taken and he had a nasty bacteria growing in his ears, which was obviously resistant to anything we had tried. The vet was concerned that there may be some bad damage to his ears (one in particular) so they brought him in to have a look under anaesthetic. If any of the inside of his ear had beem deformed of damaged by the infection it would have to be removed to prevent problems later in life. Luckily, there was just quite a bad build up of scar tissue which was taken out easily but no real damage. They also drained his ears. He was put onto heavy antibiotics for nearly a month and hasn't looked back since.

On the subject of clipping, we did it and it did nothing for my chap (it actually made him itchier because the hair had been cut so short that it grew back spikey and annoyed him). If you are having continuous problems maybe you should ask your vet to take a swab or to drain the ears (it's like a super clean!), or if there is anything else they can do, and see how things go. Don't give up on it - something will work, you just have to find it! I do agree with *Pauline* that perhaps you should do it yourself, or get a groomer to do it and give them very spacific instructions. Good luck :thmbsup:

merlinsmum
3rd February 2009, 09:09 PM
Oakley was suffereing this summer with a bad ear - after an infection it just would get back to normal, I took him to the vets who advised that i was cleaning it too often (every day) - and this was just causing us to go around and around, he suggested cleaning every other day, and then leaving it a bit longer and then a bit longer ........

It did the trick - his ear has been fine since September

HollyDolly
3rd February 2009, 10:32 PM
The best product for ear problems and then general maintenance is Thornits ear powder, over 30 years of use and touch wood have never had ear problems. I do keep the hair under the ear flap near the canal free of long hair which you can do yourself.
This stuff is brilliant and you will not be disappointed if you decide to get it.

The link:-
http://www.petmeds.co.uk/p-528-thornit-ear-powder.aspx?gclid=CMiA26-lwZgCFQHHGgodEUfpag

LucyDog
3rd February 2009, 10:42 PM
I agree with the ear powder suggestion. We had a mixed breed (part Cocker Spaniel) when I was a kid who used to get the nastiest ear infections. A groomer suggested that we try putting ear powder in his ears (especially after any water exposure) to absorb the moisture and he never had another ear infection.

lorebringer
4th February 2009, 12:16 AM
The best product for ear problems and then general maintenance is Thornits ear powder, over 30 years of use and touch wood have never had ear problems. I do keep the hair under the ear flap near the canal free of long hair which you can do yourself.
This stuff is brilliant and you will not be disappointed if you decide to get it.

The link:-
http://www.petmeds.co.uk/p-528-thornit-ear-powder.aspx?gclid=CMiA26-lwZgCFQHHGgodEUfpag

Is this available outside of the USA? (my chap gets itchy ears after they have been exposed to moisture - bath etc - so this could be one to try)

merlinsmum
17th February 2009, 02:01 PM
Oakley was suffereing this summer with a bad ear - after an infection it just would get back to normal, I took him to the vets who advised that i was cleaning it too often (every day) - and this was just causing us to go around and around, he suggested cleaning every other day, and then leaving it a bit longer and then a bit longer ........

It did the trick - his ear has been fine since September

Wish I'd never posted this! tempted fate! gues where I'm off to......

Brian M
17th February 2009, 02:40 PM
Hi

Yes totally agree Thornit powder for me too.

Shivers
17th February 2009, 03:58 PM
Well we got the vet groom done anyway - never again. I am raging that I didnt get a proper groomer to do it. Anyway, a couple of weeks on and it is starting to grow back so lesson learned, the hard way.

Ill keep in mind about that Thornits powder. We have not been having too much bother with the ear lately (you will never get me to admit that it has anything to do with the groom) :rolleyes: