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James
20th June 2009, 05:29 PM
Today I found a small tick crawling on Ben after a walk along a tarred road. I managed to get it off, but had I not spotted it, it would most certainly have bit into him. This is the third tick this year but what I am shocked at this time is that he had not been on any grass, only on tar, they must be really bad in Scotland this year, we were next to a field of sheep and their are a lot of roe deer in the area.
It looks like walks will be confined to the village pavements until the end of summer.

murphy's mum
20th June 2009, 07:58 PM
We've been plagued with them here too. I had our two up the forest 2 weeks ago, when we got back to the car I picked 4 of them off Misty. They hadn't attached themselves yet, but come on 4!

Then last week Murphy came in from his morning walk, settled on the couch with me, and I discovered one attached just beside his ear :mad:

Brian M
20th June 2009, 09:10 PM
Hi

Are they a problem all over the UK ,as in a couple of weeks we are up in the Lake District so I will have to check I am prepared.:confused:

murphy's mum
21st June 2009, 01:08 PM
Brian I think they are. It was on the news warning people to check themselves are they are biting humans, who can contract Lymes disease:eek:

There was one poor woman who didn't even realise she'd been bitten, and has contracted the disease:(

Justine
21st June 2009, 01:10 PM
I had one on my foot,i had to let him drink and wait till it fell off,then i got him,SQUISHED.

murphy's mum
21st June 2009, 01:13 PM
Oh my gosh Justine:yikes

Was it not really sore? I hate the little buggers :mad:

Rumor
21st June 2009, 02:31 PM
I have heard that they are bad in the states as well. A friend took her Beagles camping for the weekend & ended up coming home early because she was tired of pulling off ticks. I check my boys after every trip outside.

Justine
21st June 2009, 03:44 PM
Nope,didnt hurt.Just made me feel ucky.I got him though.

Rosewoodsteel
21st June 2009, 04:18 PM
We have a lot of ticks in our area of Maryland.
Frontline Plus took care of them for about 5 years and then we had to switch to Advantix about a year ago (Frontline inexplicably stopped working).
Be careful!
Deer ticks carry Lyme and these ticks are extremely small and often go unnoticed.
I had a large "bullseye" (Lyme) rash after being bitten a couple years ago.
Please use good judgement when walking in wooded areas
(tuck your pants legs into your socks and use repellent to ward the little buggers off). Make sure your little guys are treated with a good product.

Sabby
21st June 2009, 04:27 PM
We are in Scotland last week in August. And the cottage we are renting stands in its own 19 acre woodland. Thanks for the warning.
So what is the point of having all these treatments if ticks still can course damage? Like I use stronghold on mine.
And as we are on the subject of creepy crawlies when is it midgis season in Scotland?

James
21st June 2009, 08:41 PM
And as we are on the subject of creepy crawlies when is it midgie season in Scotland?

Now until the first frosts.

Aileen
21st June 2009, 09:04 PM
They are here in South Derbyshire found one on Jake last week
---Aileen and the gang (Barney---Jazzie---Jake)

waldor
21st June 2009, 09:16 PM
This is so interesting to me, because I never knew the UK and Ireland had ticks! :eek: I've never thought about it while traipsing around golf courses, old cemeteries, and sheep fields to see standing stones over there. I've always worn slacks & socks so perhaps that's why I've not gotten a tick. Maybe I'll pack bug spray for our next trip.

Justine
21st June 2009, 09:18 PM
They dont bother me at all,but there is a nasty sickness you can get and i think it can kill humans.

Brian M
21st June 2009, 09:18 PM
Hi

Pls remind me as I have never seen one whats the best way to remove them safely for the girls if the need arises ,I think I have some items in my Cavvy first aid kit including a little tool thingy to prise them off.:confused:

Kizzys Mum
21st June 2009, 09:39 PM
We found one on Ozzy a couple of weeks ago; after having dogs for years and never finding one. People at agility seem to be finding more as well. I wonder if it's because Frontline, etc is becoming ineffective? We've got tick removers - shaped like a little crowbar. Not had to use it yet, but hopefully can get it to work should we need to!

MadPip
22nd June 2009, 01:32 AM
We are in Scotland last week in August. And the cottage we are renting stands in its own 19 acre woodland. Thanks for the warning.
So what is the point of having all these treatments if ticks still can course damage? Like I use stronghold on mine.
And as we are on the subject of creepy crawlies when is it midgis season in Scotland?

We're going up to Scotland in 3 weeks, and I have the frontline spray ready for when it's needed.
Like you I use Stronghold on my dogs, but it doesn't work against ticks, only fleas, biting lice, and some worms, as I found out last year. :(
I've spoken to the vet and we're continuing with stronghold for the flea prevention (frontline stopped working) and taking the frontline spray for the ticks.

Rosewoodsteel
22nd June 2009, 04:36 AM
Advantix is working well for Charlie. :)

James
22nd June 2009, 08:31 AM
Hi

Pls remind me as I have never seen one whats the best way to remove them safely for the girls if the need arises ,I think I have some items in my Cavvy first aid kit including a little tool thingy to prise them off.:confused:

My vet tells me the secret is to use the tool to "unscrew" the tick not prise of as this will leave the head in.
I have only done this successfully on a tick embedded in my old cat but I used a Swedish trix lasso tool. When I got a tick on Ben in April and bought both the lasso and the crowbar tools and thankfully I have not had to try them out on him.

kmatt
22nd June 2009, 08:57 AM
Hi

Pls remind me as I have never seen one whats the best way to remove them safely for the girls if the need arises ,I think I have some items in my Cavvy first aid kit including a little tool thingy to prise them off.:confused:

The best way is to remove the HEAD with a pair of tweezers. Make sure you remove the head because if you just pull, the body will separate leaving the head still attached.:grnyuk:

James
22nd June 2009, 09:10 PM
I have tried tweezers over the years, mostly on my cats and I have always left the head in. The lasso tool work for me.
I also found this http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-remove-a-tick/

Rosewoodsteel
28th June 2009, 01:35 PM
Just got this from a website:

Remove the tick properly. Using sharp pointed tweezers, or specially made tick tweezers, grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible, as close to its embedded mouthparts as you can. If you squeeze the body or head, you risk compressing the guts and salivary glands and expelling even more organisms through their mouth into your body.http://www.anapsid.org/images/ticktweezers.jpg (http://www.anapsid.org/images/ticktweezers.jpg)
Do not twist the tick or turn the tweezers as you pull out the tick. Pull out straight with a slow, steady motion. Twisting may force more organisms into your body, and may result in the head or more of the mouthparts being left in your body.

Do not apply any substances to the tick before removing it - no alcohol or nail polish, no petroleum jelly or other ointments, and do not try to burn it out or otherwise convince to let go of you. It won't let go. It will just happily keep on sucking your blood and pumping pathogens into you.

Daisy's Mom
28th June 2009, 11:54 PM
Ticks are horrible here in the U.S. in most states. They are literally thick, even in places that many years ago did not have any. I don't know what it is, but it is very annoying and keeps us from doing some things that we would otherwise do with Daisy, like walking in the woods and fields with her, and even camping with her.

BTW, it takes about 24 hours for a tick to infect someone with Lyme's Disease, so the key is to get them off ASAP! I would never leave them on and wait for them to fall off. And if you do use tweezers, try to never squeeze them onto the body at all if you can help it because that smooshes the blood and bacteria they have in their stomachs back into you. So as others have said, you really have to try to attach the tweezers as close to your skin as possible. I have the little crowbar-looking tools and I feel much better getting them off with those than tweezers. I have never had a head break off using them, and there is no squeezing involved, so I don't worry so much about squishing them. Nasty little things -- I hate them with a passion.