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kmatt
25th August 2009, 07:05 PM
Anna is 6 months old now so I know her first season is coming up. I've alreayd secured an outside place for her so that she is safe outside and also have the equipment so that she won't make a mess of the house.

How soon before she starts do you think?

PS any other info is greatly appreciated!

WoodHaven
25th August 2009, 07:18 PM
Anna is 6 months old now so I know her first season is coming up. I've alreayd secured an outside place for her so that she is safe outside and also have the equipment so that she won't make a mess of the house.

How soon before she starts do you think?

PS any other info is greatly appreciated!

My youngest just finished her first season-- she started at 9 months 3 weeks. She is the "latest'' starter I've ever had-- most were between 7-9 months of age.

Love my Cavaliers
25th August 2009, 08:14 PM
Riley had her first season just before 10 months of age. We were going to pick her up at the breeders and she started that day. She stayed with the breeder until she was finished.

Phoebe
25th August 2009, 10:25 PM
Phoebe was eight months old when she started her first season, I was amazed how long the spotting went on for though, it lasted about three weeks. We then waited a while until she could be spayed.

shippers
25th August 2009, 10:47 PM
Lois was also 8 months old. Her bleeding lasted at least 3 weeks too. She'll be getting spayed on the 11th Sept which I'm getting nervous about

WoodHaven
25th August 2009, 10:55 PM
Phoebe was eight months old when she started her first season, I was amazed how long the spotting went on for though, it lasted about three weeks. We then waited a while until she could be spayed.

Three weeks is not unusual. It can go longer.

Karen and Ruby
26th August 2009, 02:17 AM
Rubys 1st was at 6 mnths 2 weeks old- it was mid june that yr. It lasts just shy of 4 weeks and we llet her have 2 seasons before her spay- not by choice but she came over poorly 2 days before she was booked in so we had to wait. She was 17 months at her spay.
Most cavvie I know are very clean during their seasons- apart from the odd spot the only way we could tell was the swelling and the loss of appitite. Loss of appetite is fairly common during heat so dont be alarmed if she goes off her food and just make sure you keep her well away from male attention.
hope all goes well

Karen

Karlin
26th August 2009, 02:37 PM
As Sandy says she may well not go into heat for three more months. Six months is pretty young. What do you mean by 'secured a place outside' -- assuming you are not actually considering ever leaving her out on her own when no one is around and this is just to let her go outside while you are always watching her :thmbsup:. A large dog can easily jump a 6 foot fence to get at a female in heat -- so she would be safer inside and should never be left outside unsupervised, especially during her heat. There isn't any great 'mess' though :) -- sounds like you got the little heat panties and that is all you really need; some dogs don't need them. Is there a reason you decided not to spay before first heat? Not doing so automatically increases her risk of mammary cancer to 7% over her lifetime. Though maybe you have decided to wait til after the first heat?

maddoglady
26th August 2009, 02:41 PM
My vet wont spay until after their first season.

Karlin
26th August 2009, 02:44 PM
Yes, vets can have different opinions but few tend to recommend waiting til first season any more though most will support a responsible owner who opts for waiting, too :) (a lot used to recommend females all have a litter first!! :yikes Even if the puppies were just drowned afterwards :( ). I prefer not to add to the mammary cancer risk and also won't home unspayed female rescue dogs anyway so they get done at 6 months, on the very rare occasions I have dogs in that young. :)

The issue is debated many times, pros and cons, elsewhere on the board so doing a search will bring up threads for anyone who wants to read through the different aspects of each side. :thmbsup:

WoodHaven
26th August 2009, 03:41 PM
I would never keep an in season female outside. The mess is usually minimal- they make bitches britches or you can just confine her inside to a room that the floor is easily cleaned.

kmatt
26th August 2009, 04:46 PM
As Sandy says she may well not go into heat for three more months. Six months is pretty young. What do you mean by 'secured a place outside' -- assuming you are not actually considering ever leaving her out on her own when no one is around and this is just to let her go outside while you are always watching her :thmbsup:. A large dog can easily jump a 6 foot fence to get at a female in heat -- so she would be safer inside and should never be left outside unsupervised, especially during her heat. There isn't any great 'mess' though :) -- sounds like you got the little heat panties and that is all you really need; some dogs don't need them. Is there a reason you decided not to spay before first heat? Not doing so automatically increases her risk of mammary cancer to 7% over her lifetime. Though maybe you have decided to wait til after the first heat?

I will be letting her out unsupervised. I have a 12ft high double wood fence with 3 feet of concrete at the base because we used to have a digger. She has a room that she will be confined to when she is inside that is all tile so that I can mop it a couple of times a day. I just remember my other dogs going through heat at six or seven months old and as she is six and a half I was starting to get worried.

I do plan on breeding, granted I get the results I need.

Is there anything else special that I need to do? I've never gone through heat with a small dog before so I just don't want to do something that I'd do for a large dog and not a small one.

WoodHaven
26th August 2009, 05:12 PM
I will be letting her out unsupervised. I have a 12ft high double wood fence with 3 feet of concrete at the base because we used to have a digger. She has a room that she will be confined to when she is inside that is all tile so that I can mop it a couple of times a day. I just remember my other dogs going through heat at six or seven months old and as she is six and a half I was starting to get worried.

I do plan on breeding, granted I get the results I need.

Is there anything else special that I need to do? I've never gone through heat with a small dog before so I just don't want to do something that I'd do for a large dog and not a small one.

As long as you have experience doing this and understand the risk, it is all up to you. My friend had a Pyr that attacked to get to her cavaliers in season and about took a wall off her house.
Where I live I can NEVER let a small dog outside unattended. Between the coyotes, hawks, eagles, owls and other human type scavengers- I just can't do it. And I live in the suburbs of Chicago.

This is how smart (or stupid) some dogs are-- When there is a will, there is a way.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SDhrgETDYY

chloe92us
26th August 2009, 09:58 PM
Wow, I wonder how she survives that over and over again with no broken bones. I think that would be a sign that those dogs need to get out of that pen and get some attention! :swear:

I truly do not understand why you would have dogs and keep them outside in a pen all the time. WHAT IS THE POINT????

WoodHaven
26th August 2009, 10:05 PM
Wow, I wonder how she survives that over and over again with no broken bones. I think that would be a sign that those dogs need to get out of that pen and get some attention! :swear:

I truly do not understand why you would have dogs and keep them outside in a pen all the time. WHAT IS THE POINT????

I wonder??How much time and effort that dog put into that escape?
OK, right now I have an intact male that is DRIVING me bonkers-- :swear:, I still wouldn't put him outside without human interaction.

My point was, if given the right incentive-- no fencing in the world will keep some dogs out. A bitch in heat will be a major incentive.

Karlin
27th August 2009, 01:37 AM
I do plan on breeding, granted I get the results I need.



Why does your answer not surprise me?:rolleyes:

kmatt you bought your dog from a BYB -- and she is NOT breeding to any great standard as every picture you have posted demonstrates, and did she do any health screening at all? Cardiologists? MRIs? Nope. Anna is a lovely PET. She is NOT breeding quality and you do NOT have the background information on her for her to comply with even the MVD protocol until she is age FIVE. More importantly: why are you 'thinking about breeding' if you get the 'results' you want. WHAT results? Are you MRIing? Are you planning this starting when she is 2.5? Your dog ownership questions over the time you have been here have been very, very basic, yet you are considering BREEDING this breed, at this point, when people need to understand genetics, ethics, complex inheritence, family lines, have good relationships with reputable, health focused show breeders to even find the healthful sires you would need, and be willing to put some serious money into proper testing and breeding as well?

Worse: I see in Bet's Food for Thought thread you announced already your belief that the world needs backyard breeders for genetic diversity and health -- which according to you there, means good eyesight and 'a good smell'. Good grief. You have spent months and months on this board, yet the critical issues of MVD and SM in the breed, which can bring untold suffering to the dogs, and the need for responsible breeding by people who actually understand such concepts, has apparently totally passed you by. And yet you think you know enough to be considering something as serious as breeding a breed which is currently in crisis? :confused: Your understanding of the role of genetic diversity is to have a dog that can smell? Why in the world do you think the average cavalier cannot? :rolleyes:

Also you have shown yet again that despite me asking you before, in response to some inappropriate questions, to read the appropriate guidelines in the Getting Started section, you still have seemingly never bothered to read the basics of what you can post about -- breeding and your plans to do so is NOT one of the allowable topics -- and have totally missed the whole point of a board that is dedicated to promoting health, preserving this breed and discouraging BYBs who have already contributed so much to the decline of this breed's health. The point is: you should not be considering breeding. The breed does not need more trash breeders to arrive in just as good, reputable breeders are facing the dilemma of whether to remain in the breed due to the costs of health-focused testing and responsible breeding. What exactly would you plan to contribute?

:sl*p: