PDA

View Full Version : Cavaliers and their Serious Problem with Periodontal Diseases.



Bet
17th June 2010, 10:13 AM
I could'nt find the Thread where there was a Discussion about Cavaliers and their Teeth Problems ,so have started this New Thread.

Professor Larry Glickman North Carolina School of Medicine, America,who has recently written a Paper about Gum Problems in Dogs, so I contacted him wondering whether there could be a Link with our Cavaliers' Serious Heart Problem and Periodontal Diseases I have just had this reply back.

He said that ,Yes ,CKCS have a serious Problem with Periodontal Diseases with about 50% of Cavaliers being affected by Mid Age

That this could Potentially explain a High Proportion of all MVD Valve Murmurs .

He further mentioned that a Study is needed to determine the Relationship between Periodontal Disease and MVD .

He suggested that when a Cavalier is being Heart Tested ,check their ORAL HEALTH at the same Time, this way it could be discovered if there might be a Link.

Bet

Tania
17th June 2010, 11:30 AM
It has been known for ages there is a link between periodontol disease and heart disease in humans. I have always been surprised there are not more campaigns from the government or dentists regarding this.

http://www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

RodRussell
17th June 2010, 04:51 PM
... He said that ,Yes ,CKCS have a serious Problem with Periodontal Diseases with about 50% of Cavaliers being affected by Mid Age

That this could Potentially explain a High Proportion of all MVD Valve Murmurs .

He further mentioned that a Study is needed to determine the Relationship between Periodontal Disease and MVD .

He suggested that when a Cavalier is being Heart Tested ,check their ORAL HEALTH at the same Time, this way it could be discovered if there might be a Link. ...

Having any dog's mouth periodically examined for plaque, etc. is always a good practice. Plaque is the hiding ground of bacteria which can zip through the blood stream from the mouth and cause endocarditis, which is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, including the valves.

It can be diagnosed, and its features are different from endocardiosis, which is what we refer to as mitral valve disease. They are not the same disease, and it is quite misleading to suggest that they are. Endocarditis does not "Potentially explain a High Proportion of all MVD Valve Murmurs" at all. We already know why Cavaliers have a higher proportion of MVD than other breeds, and it is not due to gum disease. It is a genetic defect.

If Dr. Glickman really said that "a Study is needed to determine the Relationship between Periodontal Disease and MVD", then my response would be: "Oh, really, Doctor? Another such study is needed? Surely he does not mean that; surely he knows better than to suggest that this connection has not been studied.

Bet
17th June 2010, 06:50 PM
Having any dog's mouth periodically examined for plaque, etc. is always a good practice. Plaque is the hiding ground of bacteria which can zip through the blood stream from the mouth and cause endocarditis, which is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, including the valves.

It can be diagnosed, and its features are different from endocardiosis, which is what we refer to as mitral valve disease. They are not the same disease, and it is quite misleading to suggest that they are. Endocarditis does not "Potentially explain a High Proportion of all MVD Valve Murmurs" at all. We already know why Cavaliers have a higher proportion of MVD than other breeds, and it is not due to gum disease. It is a genetic defect.

If Dr. Glickman really said that "a Study is needed to determine the Relationship between Periodontal Disease and MVD", then my response would be: "Oh, really, Doctor? Another such study is needed? Surely he does not mean that; surely he knows better than to suggest that this connection has not been studied.


Cavaliers and Their Serious Problem with Periodontal Diseases.

I have passed on Professor Larry Glickman's E-Mail to a Cardiologist who is Researching MVD in our Cavalier Breed.

Professor Glickman mentioned in his recent Paper ,that around 59.000 Dogs had been involved with his Research.

Bet













I have passed on Professor Larry Glickman's E-Mail to a Cardiologist Researching MVD in Cavaliers.

Tania
17th June 2010, 07:24 PM
Do you remember a while back Mark Oyama had a conference about this and he linked MVD to Serotonin. I have the hard copy of this conference if anyone would like it:- This is a little snippet.

. And interestingly in the Cavaliers as compared to all other non-Cavalier breeds, they have a higher circulating blood serotonin levels.
One question that a lot of people always ask me is, well, what are the other effects of really high circulating serotonin levels. So we like to joke we have to ask a neurologist, but I like to joke itís very rare that you meet a Cavalier who is not extremely happy. They are like the happiest dogs in the entire world I think. And so itís interesting to me that within this preliminary phase they have lots of serotonin running around. I mean remember, high serotonin at least in the central nervous system you feel good, thatís anti-depressants. So maybe all these Cavaliers are Ė maybe they are really depressed about their mitral valve disease but they are not showing it because they have a lot of serotonin. So that would make a good study.

So we know that serotonin activates those mitral valve cells, so mitral valve cells just kind of sitting back, they shouldnít be doing a whole lot. If you put serotonin in with those mitral valve cells, they start to become more active and start to make a lot of that glycosaminoglycan or GAG. Okay, so I debated whether or not put a bunch of these slides in here but I think itís instructive to look at.


So the question then is, is serotonin somehow linked to the development or progression of valve disease. The fact that there is serotonin generating pathways within the valves and maybe a higher circulating serotonin in predisposed dogs particularly the Cavalier, does that have something to do with the high incidence of mitral valve disease particularly in the Cavalier, then also the progression of disease once that valve starts to weaken and fail.

Karlin
18th June 2010, 09:18 PM
Really interesting posts; thanks for those!

RodRussell
18th June 2010, 09:23 PM
... Professor Glickman mentioned in his recent Paper ,that around 59.000 Dogs had been involved with his Research. ...

I know that he has been active in preparing surveys, in cooperation with breed clubs, which then are sent out to breeders and owners, who answer the questions about their dogs' health and treatment, and then send back the answers, which then are tabulated as statistics. This may explain the high number of dogs in his research.

He conducted one of these with the ACKCSC a few years ago, and I found the results to be rather puzzling because they seemed inconsistent with the reports from research vets published in veterinary journals. I'd like to refer you to the study, but the ACKCSC's charitable trust apparently has removed the report from its website -- http://ackcscharitabletrust.org/funded-research/breed-health-survey.html

I suspect that either owner ignorance or possibly some breeder bias may play a role in the answers to some of these surveys.

Bet
19th June 2010, 08:38 AM
I know that he has been active in preparing surveys, in cooperation with breed clubs, which then are sent out to breeders and owners, who answer the questions about their dogs' health and treatment, and then send back the answers, which then are tabulated as statistics. This may explain the high number of dogs in his research.

He conducted one of these with the ACKCSC a few years ago, and I found the results to be rather puzzling because they seemed inconsistent with the reports from research vets published in veterinary journals. I'd like to refer you to the study, but the ACKCSC's charitable trust apparently has removed the report from its website -- http://ackcscharitabletrust.org/funded-research/breed-health-survey.html

I suspect that either owner ignorance or possibly some breeder bias may play a role in the answers to some of these surveys.

CAVALIERS and THEIR SERIOUS PROBLEMS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASE

The Headlines from a Paper says Purdue Professor Larry Glickman Links Gum and Heart Disease in Dogs.

A Purdue University Study has recently demonstrated a Link between Gum Diseases and Heart Problems in Dogs.

Professor Glickman's Study was Published in the Februrary Edition of the Journal of American Veterinary Medical Association .

As with all Papers Published , this Paper would have been Peer Reviewed before it was accepted.

As I mentioned in my Previous Post, I have passed on Professor L. Glickman's, Personal E-Mails with his information to a Cardiologist in Britain Researching MVD in Cavaliers.

So as I have always said, I will leave it to the Experts to see what they make of it.

I am not an Expert ,just the Messenger.

Bet

RodRussell
19th June 2010, 04:16 PM
... A Purdue University Study has recently demonstrated a Link between Gum Diseases and Heart Problems in Dogs. Professor Glickman's Study was Published in the Februrary Edition of the Journal of American Veterinary Medical Association . As with all Papers Published , this Paper would have been Peer Reviewed before it was accepted. ... So as I have always said, I will leave it to the Experts to see what they make of it. ...

Bet, the study, published in 2009, appears to have nothing to do with MVD in Cavaliers. Here is a summary of it:

Evaluation of the risk of endocarditis and other cardiovascular events on the basis of the severity of periodontal disease in dogs. Glickman LT, Glickman NW, Moore GE, Goldstein GS, Lewis HB. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009 Feb 15;234(4):486-94.

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that increased severity of periodontal disease in dogs is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related events, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy, as well as markers of inflammation. DESIGN: Historical cohort observational study. SAMPLE POPULATION: 59,296 dogs with a history of periodontal disease (periodontal cohort), of which 23,043 had stage 1 disease, 20,732 had stage 2 disease, and 15,521 had stage 3 disease; and an age-matched comparison group of 59,296 dogs with no history of periodontal disease (nonperiodontal cohort). PROCEDURES: Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the risk of cardiovascular-related diagnoses and examination findings in dogs as a function of the stage of periodontal disease (1, 2, or 3 or no periodontal disease) over time while controlling for the effect of potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Significant associations were detected between the severity of periodontal disease and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy, but not between the severity of periodontal disease and the risk of a variety of other common noncardiovascular-related conditions. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The findings of this observational study, similar to epidemiologic studies in humans, suggested that periodontal disease was associated with cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Chronic inflammation is probably an important mechanism connecting bacterial flora in the oral cavity of dogs with systemic disease. Canine health may be improved if veterinarians and pet owners place a higher priority on routine dental care.

As best I can tell, that article does not mention Cavaliers.

EddyAnne
21st June 2010, 01:55 AM
Glickerman and associates suggested that periodontal disease was associated with cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy. For some breeds the gene mutations have already been found for cardiomyopathy and where DNA testing is already available for the public to use, here is an example in Boxers.
http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/deptsVCGL/Boxer/test.aspx

Maybe more meaningful research might be obtained from breeds where all the research dogs have been DNA tested and their genetic cardiomyopathy status is known.

Besides cardiomyopathy there was mention of endocarditis. Endocarditis simply means inflammation of the heart's inner lining (endocardium). The endocardium is also the membrane that covers the heart's inner walls in all four chambers and includes the linings of the four heart valves. Bacteria from a mouth that has periodontal disease the bacteria might enter the blood system and travel to the heart and where an infection might start and where endocarditis may develop and this maybe even on the heart valves. Bacteria in the blood commonly called bacteremia or bacteraemia, the bacteria could also travel via the blood to organs throughout the body and even to the brain, and in a number of locations infections might also establish.

As for genetic MVD well I think that it may be best to avoid another problem in bacterial endocarditis by practicing good oral hygiene. Also certain bacteria normally live on parts of your body, such as the mouth and upper respiratory system, the intestinal and urinary tracts, and the skin, any yes some surgical and dental procedures cause a brief bacteraemia and in cases where more may occur antibiotics may be prescribed. In periodontal disease cases there too antibiotics may be prescribed along with good oral hygiene.
.

AT
21st June 2010, 08:43 AM
Some of the breeds with the worst teeth are poodles, papillons , yorkies etc & all are known for being long lived

Cleaning their teeth is good for their overall health but I dont think it will stop mvd

Bet
21st June 2010, 09:35 AM
Some of the breeds with the worst teeth are poodles, papillons , yorkies etc & all are known for being long lived

Cleaning their teeth is good for their overall health but I dont think it will stop mvd


Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease

I am glad this Thread is now being discussed

It was mentioned in a Post about some other Breeds of Dogs having bad Teeth ,but no Heart problems.

When you think about it ,what other Breeds have a Predisposition to Heart Trouble like the Cavalier Breed,and has been stated by Cardiologists ,that no other Toy Breed has such early onset of MVD than what the Cavalier Breed has.

Now it is a fact that Bad Teeth cause Bacterial Problems and this gets into the Blood- Stream and can attack different Organs in the Body,so if the Cavaliers have a Predisposition to Bad Hearts ,could that not be the first place that could be being attacked.

I just don't know, but this subject is now being considered by Cardiologists.

The more you think about it ,the more it could be making sense.

Bet

Bet
21st June 2010, 11:39 AM
Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease

I am glad this Thread is now being discussed

It was mentioned in a Post about some other Breeds of Dogs having bad Teeth ,but no Heart problems.

When you think about it ,what other Breeds have a Predisposition to Heart Trouble like the Cavalier Breed,and has been stated by Cardiologists ,that no other Toy Breed has such early onset of MVD than what the Cavalier Breed has.

Now it is a fact that Bad Teeth cause Bacterial Problems and this gets into the Blood- Stream and can attack different Organs in the Body,so if the Cavaliers have a Predisposition to Bad Hearts ,could that not be the first place that could be being attacked.

I just don't know, but this subject is now being considered by Cardiologists.

The more you think about it ,the more it could be making sense.

Bet



If I could pass on this further information while it's still fresh in my mind.

Here in Britain there was Heart Seminar held ,1995, where it was mentioned that there was a Proven Link between Cavaliers and Endocarditis, the question was asked at the Seminar about Teeth Problems and Endocarditis and it was confirmed , yes there is a Link.

Some-body had asked as to whether Cavaliers were prone to having Teeth Problems, and again the answer was yes.

It is known that Endocarditis can affect the Heart Valves,this Seminar was 15 years ago.

Eddy has also mentioned this Link between Heart Valves and Endocarditis ,and MVD is to do Heart Valves.

I just wonder whether a Survey should be carried out to discover how many Cavaliers who have Bad Teeth are suffering from a Heart condition.

Just a Thought.

Bet

EddyAnne
21st June 2010, 04:18 PM
Bet I tend to think of endocarditis from periodontal disease as another completely different problem and a problem to be avoided. Bacterial endocarditis could possibly be a really serious heart situation on its own and could possibly be life threatening within days. Well I wouldn't want such a problem on top of another heart problem be it MVD or whatever.

I also mentioned that bacteria could also travel via the blood to organs throughout the body and even to the brain, and in a number of locations throughout the body infections might also establish. With that in mind I'll change to something else instead of the heart.

Meningitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges. The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs. Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation's proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore the condition is classified as serious and a medical emergency. If I had heritable SM with syrinxes I certainly would not want yet another problem such as Meningitis or Arachnoiditis on top of my heritable SM problem.

Maybe next we could discuss organs such as the liver or kidneys, and if we already had a problem with those we wouldn't want yet another problem in those organs, not even from microorganisms in the blood which might have originated from a mouth problem in a periodontal disease.
.

Bet
21st June 2010, 06:07 PM
Bet I tend to think of endocarditis from periodontal disease as another completely different problem and a problem to be avoided. Bacterial endocarditis could possibly be a really serious heart situation on its own and could possibly be life threatening within days. Well I wouldn't want such a problem on top of another heart problem be it MVD or whatever.

I also mentioned that bacteria could also travel via the blood to organs throughout the body and even to the brain, and in a number of locations throughout the body infections might also establish. With that in mind I'll change to something else instead of the heart.

Meningitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges. The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs. Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation's proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore the condition is classified as serious and a medical emergency. If I had heritable SM with syrinxes I certainly would not want yet another problem such as Meningitis or Arachnoiditis on top of my heritable SM problem.

Maybe next we could discuss organs such as the liver or kidneys, and if we already had a problem with those we wouldn't want yet another problem in those organs, not even from microorganisms in the blood which might have originated from a mouth problem in a periodontal disease.
.


Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Diseases.


Eddy,

I am just waiting to see what happens about all this, the Cardiologists are having a think about it.

So that is all that can be done at the moment.

I have just passed on Professor Larry Glickman's advice and Information from his Private E-Mail to me ,to a Research Cavalier Cardiologist ,so time will tell about what might happen about it.

Bet

RodRussell
21st June 2010, 06:42 PM
... I am just waiting to see what happens about all this, the Cardiologists are having a think about it. ...

Bet, I don't think anybody is having a think about it at all. There is no news here; nothing new to be learned. To suggest that bacteria from the mouth is causing mitral valve disease in Cavaliers -- which is referred to as "endocardiosis" -- is to ignore the past 30 years of research (at least!).

EddyAnne
21st June 2010, 07:27 PM
Meanwhile here today is some interesting news and from this address.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/10367883.stm

ABC News
Monday, 21 June 2010
10,000 NHS patients 'to have genes mapped'
By By Fergus Walsh

An NHS hospital has begun decoding all the genes of individual patients, 10 years after the first human genome sequence was published.

London's Royal Brompton Hospital said the project would give doctors a better understanding of the inherited factors that help trigger heart disease.

The research involves sequencing all 22,000 genes found in the human genome in 10,000 patients.

It heralds more personalised treatments for diseases.

Genes are chunks of DNA that contain instructions for making chemicals in the body. As well as controlling things like eye and hair colour, faults in genes may make people susceptible to disease.

The sections of DNA that make up all a person's genes are known as the exome. Although genes represent only about 1% of the entire genome, they contain most of the key information for diagnosing inherited disease and for finding targets for new treatments.

In all 10,000 patients will have their genes sequenced at the Royal Brompton Hospital, which specialises in the treatment of heart and lung conditions, over the next 10 years.

They will also have a detailed MRI scan of the heart to show how it is functioning. The study has been made possible because of dramatic progress in the speed of DNA sequencing.

The research project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, which awarded £6m over four years.

It is headed by Professor Dudley Pennell, director of the cardiovascular magnetic resonance unit at the Royal Brompton and professor of cardiology at Imperial College London.

He said: "Ultimately our aim is for someone to come in and have a full scan and genetic analysis, leading to a personalised therapy which will treat their particular disease."

Professor Dame Sally Davies, director general of research and development for the Department of Health and NHS, said the project was "terribly exciting".

She said: "Ten years after the first full sequencing of the human genome, it's now coming to patients and this will herald more individualised treatments."

Although the research is targeting the genetic causes of cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, the sequencing may reveal inherited risk factors for other conditions.

Patients have to undergo extensive genetic counselling before their results are revealed.

Landmark

Ten years ago this week, Bill Clinton and Tony Blair held simultaneous press conferences in the White House and Downing Street to announce the first draft human genome had been completed.

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge did more of the sequencing than any of the 20 labs involved around the world.

That project was billed as one of the greatest medical breakthroughs in history. It took 13 years to completely sequence the first human genome. The Sanger Institute can now sequence an entire genome in 13 hours.

Scientists say the more patients that are screened, the more we will understand which genes are responsible for triggering disease.

Professor Mike Stratton, director of the Sanger Institute, said it should increasingly lead to more personalised medicine.

"The new therapies that are in development will be applicable to some people and not to others and the choice of therapies for individuals will be determined by what is present in their genome.

"That is going to be good for patients because they will get the right drugs for them, and good for the health service as they won't be giving the wrong drugs to the wrong patients."

The Sanger Institute is part of the 1000 Genomes Project, an international public-private consortium to build the most detailed map of human genetic variation to date.

It has announced the completion of three pilot projects and that work has begun on building a public database containing information from the genomes of 2,500 people from 27 populations around the world.
.

Bet
22nd June 2010, 09:27 AM
Bet, I don't think anybody is having a think about it at all. There is no news here; nothing new to be learned. To suggest that bacteria from the mouth is causing mitral valve disease in Cavaliers -- which is referred to as "endocardiosis" -- is to ignore the past 30 years of research (at least!).

Cavaliers AND THEIR SERIOUS PROBLEMS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASE


Just to say Rod, that you are not up to date with your Facts, at least for here in Britain, the weather is too good to be getting into an argument with you, I know what I have said is a fact , and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know.

Bet

EddyAnne
22nd June 2010, 06:31 PM
and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know.
Oh a Cardiologists meeting, maybe Jeff Sampson might be attending in regards to the BVA/KC Heart Scheme which the KC may want up and running soon and particularly so before next Crufts.
.

RodRussell
22nd June 2010, 06:43 PM
Just to say Rod, that you are not up to date with your Facts, at least for here in Britain, the weather is too good to be getting into an argument with you, I know what I have said is a fact , and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know. ...

Well, most all of the US cardiologists met from June 9 to 12 in California at the annual ACVIM Forum, and none of them presented anything about gum bacteria affecting MVD in the breed, or even in dogs in general. I am not aware of any meetings of US cardiologists this week or the near future.

EddyAnne
22nd June 2010, 07:53 PM
Well, most all of the US cardiologists met from June 9 to 12 in California at the annual ACVIM Forum, and none of them presented anything about gum bacteria affecting MVD in the breed, or even in dogs in general. I am not aware of any meetings of US cardiologists this week or the near future.
I had a look at the ACVIM 2010 website and that was a rather large meeting.
http://www.acvimforum.org/
.

Bet
23rd June 2010, 09:10 AM
Well, most all of the US cardiologists met from June 9 to 12 in California at the annual ACVIM Forum, and none of them presented anything about gum bacteria affecting MVD in the breed, or even in dogs in general. I am not aware of any meetings of US cardiologists this week or the near future.


Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease


Rod,

I just don't want to make snide Comments, but there are Cardiologists and MVD Research for our Cavalier Breed going on in other parts of the World ,not just in America.

If I hear any more about what I was mentioning ,I will let the List know.

Bet

RodRussell
23rd June 2010, 01:36 PM
Rod, I just don't want to make snide Comments, but there are Cardiologists and MVD Research for our Cavalier Breed going on in other parts of the World ,not just in America. ...

Bet, you wrote to me that: "there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know." And since, as you know, America is where I live, I thought you might be referring to a meeting of cardiologists which had just taken place in America, or is about to take place here.

Bet
28th June 2010, 10:59 AM
It has been known for ages there is a link between periodontol disease and heart disease in humans. I have always been surprised there are not more campaigns from the government or dentists regarding this.

http://www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm


CAVALIERS And Their SERIOUS PROBLEMS With PERIODONTAL DISEASE

Tania,

I never had Printed off the Link you gave, just done it, it makes interesting Reading.

It says that Researchers have found that People with Periodantal Disease are almost Twice as likely to suffer from Coronary Artery Disease as those without Periodontal Disease.

Also it was mentioned that Periodontal Disease can Exacerbate Existing Heart Conditions.

Now to our Cavaliers ,in a Paper it was stated that Periodontal Disease is the most Common Disease found in Dogs and affects more than 80% of THREE YEARS OR OLDER.....also TOY and MINATURE BREEDS are MORE Severly Affected

That Systemic Disease may develope because the GUMS are very Vascular,Have a Good Blood Supply ,.....

The Blood Stream carries these Anaerobic Microorganisms.,and they are Filtered out by the Kidneys and Liver ,where they may Colonize and create Microabscesses.

The Microoganisms travelling through the Blood may also Attach to the Heart Valves ,causing Vegatative Endocarditis ,Infected Heart Valves .

Finally in another Paper ,it was mentioned that there is Risk Factor between Periodontal Disease and Heart Disease, that Humans with Severe Periodontal Disease are between 24%-35% more likely also to have Coronary Artery Disease.

Bet

Bet
1st July 2010, 05:34 PM
CAVALIERS And Their SERIOUS PROBLEMS With PERIODONTAL DISEASE

Tania,

I never had Printed off the Link you gave, just done it, it makes interesting Reading.

It says that Researchers have found that People with Periodantal Disease are almost Twice as likely to suffer from Coronary Artery Disease as those without Periodontal Disease.

Also it was mentioned that Periodontal Disease can Exacerbate Existing Heart Conditions.

Now to our Cavaliers ,in a Paper it was stated that Periodontal Disease is the most Common Disease found in Dogs and affects more than 80% of THREE YEARS OR OLDER.....also TOY and MINATURE BREEDS are MORE Severly Affected

That Systemic Disease may develope because the GUMS are very Vascular,Have a Good Blood Supply ,.....

The Blood Stream carries these Anaerobic Microorganisms.,and they are Filtered out by the Kidneys and Liver ,where they may Colonize and create Microabscesses.

The Microoganisms travelling through the Blood may also Attach to the Heart Valves ,causing Vegatative Endocarditis ,Infected Heart Valves .

Finally in another Paper ,it was mentioned that there is Risk Factor between Periodontal Disease and Heart Disease, that Humans with Severe Periodontal Disease are between 24%-35% more likely also to have Coronary Artery Disease.

Bet

It now seems to be agreed that Dogs with Periodontal Disease, including our Cavaliers,can have a Detrimental affect on their Hearts.

Is this all the more reason why a number of Cavalier Breeders should be now paying more attention to the UK CKCS Club's Breeding Guide-lines,so that Cavaliers with a Heart Condition are not being used in Breeding Programs.

If 50% of Cavaliers are still having a Heart Murmur ,and this is no better than it was 18 years ago,then will those Cavaliers with Bad Teeth be fighting a losing Battle against the MVD which afflicts our Cavalier Breed.

Bet