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erimou
14th January 2011, 04:35 PM
Hi there. I'm just curious if anyone else has this problem where your Cav's eyes are sensitive to light. For instance, if Boz sees the reflection of the sun hitting an object and it bounces on the wall, he will just go crazy about it. He becomes all fixated, and it's hard to break him from looking at it.

I also had to take the light bulb out of my vacuum, because somehow he became fixated on that.

Does anyone have this problem? If so, what's the best way to get him to stop? I usually stand in between him and the light source so he doesn't see it for awhile and tell him 'that's enough.' It seems to work for the most part....

Thanks!

Soushiruiuma
14th January 2011, 09:44 PM
This could be simply an OCD issue. Although, as has recently been mentioned here, SM dogs might be more light sensitive.

I've personally never understood lights on vacuums anyway. Who vacuums in the dark?

Nicki
14th January 2011, 11:35 PM
OCD is obsessive compulsive disorder, Cavaliers seem very prone to it and play with laser lights etc should never be encouraged [it's obvious that you are discouraging the behaviour but we sadly have had people who think it's entertaining to watch and then end up with really bad behavioural problems with their dog :(:(]


You are doing the right things, try to distract him, maybe with a special game or treat.

You might find this thread helpful too

http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-21443.html

erimou
15th January 2011, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the info! :)

Ddavis
15th January 2011, 08:42 AM
You might find this thread helpful too

http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-21443.html

Thank you for the link Nicki, very interesting read. My Tri loves to lick (couch, carpet, blankets, my Dachshunds head, face and ears as well as peoples legs). She seems to go into a trance and does not even hear you when you call. You distract her and tell her to stop and this might last about a minute or two then she is at it again. She does not do it all day long or anything like that, but at least 2 or 3 times a day she has a 'licking session'. Not sure what to do about it?

Nicki
15th January 2011, 10:41 AM
Darlene if it's only a couple of times a day then that is not too bad and sounds fairly manageable - maybe mention it to your vet and that Cavaliers seem to be predisposed to OCD.


Try to distract her, maybe run though some training exercises to get her brain concentrating on something else.


I'm presuming this occurs in isolation, no signs of seizure activity, fly licking or anything else?

Ddavis
15th January 2011, 10:57 AM
Darlene if it's only a couple of times a day then that is not too bad and sounds fairly manageable - maybe mention it to your vet and that Cavaliers seem to be predisposed to OCD.


Try to distract her, maybe run though some training exercises to get her brain concentrating on something else.


I'm presuming this occurs in isolation, no signs of seizure activity, fly licking or anything else?

Thanks Nicki ... no none of those signs at all.

She has however lately taken to standing on Gekko/lizzard watch. She stands or sits early morning or evening staring very intently waiting for any movement ... then she is off like a shot to investigate. It is quite amusing to watch but she will sit like that for about 15 to 20 minutes at a time.

Here is a picture of Tyla in one of her intense stare moments.

http://i1182.photobucket.com/albums/x459/darlene_davis1/My%20Pets/th_01-Tyla.jpg (http://s1182.photobucket.com/albums/x459/darlene_davis1/My%20Pets/?action=view&current=01-Tyla.jpg&newest=1)

With her licking I will try the distraction route. I'm thinking I should the distraction route when she is doing her Gekko Watch as well?

Nicki
15th January 2011, 11:06 AM
Yes I think so too, if you do feel she is getting worse then it may be worth taking it further and asking for a referral to a neurologist.


Compulsive disorders are compared to obsessive compulsive disorders in humans and are poorly understood; it has been suggested in the Cavalier that there is an underlying neurochemical and/or metabolic imbalance. Diagnosis is typically made on the basis of clinical history and elimination of other behavioural, medical, metabolic, and neurological disorders. Compulsive disorders are managed with a programme of training to interrupt the behaviour sometimes combined with drugs such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. High protein diets, i.e. high meat content, tend to make compulsive behaviours worse and conversion to a low protein diet can result in improvement of signs although in some dogs this may be only temporary.


from http://www.veterinary-neurologist.co.uk/part3.htm