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Iamchinh
17th May 2011, 07:09 PM
I have a Cavalier King Charles about a month ago he has had leaks, threw up, barely eats, recently threw up a solid brown mass, and is restless. I got blood work, xrays, and CT-scans done, but everything came out negative for any thing wrong...I also went to 3 different vets and they are also clueless on what is the cause, and I was hoping someone out there would know..The vets prescribed nausea medicine and even steroids but nothing seem to be working, and today he collapsed while I took him out to go pee :(


Thanks for any help,
Iamchinh

RodRussell
17th May 2011, 10:24 PM
I have a Cavalier King Charles about a month ago he has had leaks, threw up, barely eats, recently threw up a solid brown mass, and is restless. I got blood work, xrays, and CT-scans done, but everything came out negative for any thing wrong...I also went to 3 different vets and they are also clueless on what is the cause, and I was hoping someone out there would know..The vets prescribed nausea medicine and even steroids but nothing seem to be working, and today he collapsed while I took him out to go pee :(

Thanks for any help,
Iamchinh

Where do you live? If in the USA or Canada, I would take him to a holistic vet. There is a search engine for them at http://www.holisticvetlist.com/

Look for one who has a D.V.M. degree and is licensed as a vet in your state. He also should be qualified in these modalities: acupuncture, homeopathy, Chinese herbs, and preferably homotoxicology.

I have found that when a health issue stumps the conventional practice vets, a really good holistic vet can find the problem and start solving it. For example, blood work will not show a liver problem until the liver is 75% gone. A holistic vet can detect liver issues much earlier than that and start treating with things that conventional vets have no clue about.

Iamchinh
18th May 2011, 08:23 PM
Thanks I'll look into it!

Karlin
18th May 2011, 10:28 PM
Have you tried a specialist rather than a regular vets? I would be looking for someone with better knowledge of issues that could cause gastrointestinal problems that a regular vet practice which can easily miss a specialist problem -- as many of us here can testify regarding the common neurological issue in the breed, syringomyelia, vets can repeatedly miss a diagnosis because the disease would not normally be seen as a part of general practice and also will not always do the needed tests to spot the problem. The symptoms you are seeing sound quite serious.

Unfortunately Nicki is not on the board for the next few weeks because she is out for her own surgery -- she is really good on a lot of the less commonly recognised GI problems and the health issues that can cause them. :( Pat is great on health issues as well and may perhaps have some suggestions if she sees this post.

Is there any possibility your dog is eating a poisonous plant or other item in the garden or house -- eg raisins, grapes, chocolate, cocoa mulch, a chemical cleaner or spray licked off of floors or furniture or paws...

How old is your dog; how long have you had him; any health history?

Pat
19th May 2011, 01:15 AM
You have given way too little history and information for us to be very helpful. I presume that you intended to say that your vets did an ultrasound rather than a CT scan, right? Do you have copies of the blood chemistry report and written reports from the ultrasound and radiographs? Was a urinalysis also done? A urinalysis can show some problems before they are detected in blood chemistry and would help to shed some light on the differential diagnoses (list of potential problems that could be present). There are many things that could cause the symptoms you describe. I'm surprised that the vets haven't referred you to a specialist - it is more a matter of finding someone qualified to properly decide on what tests to give and to interpret the results - i.e., an ultrasound done by a GP vet versus an internist will often give very different results.

I disagree with Rod - I'd want an immediate consult with a board certified internist. You can search for one at the ACVIM website if you are in the US or Canada - http://www.acvim.org. I have a holistic vet on my team who is certified in all of the modalities that Rod mentioned and she is a valuable member of my vet team but I'd go straight for an internal medicine specialist first to get a diagnosis and then I'd consult my holistic vet for complementary treatments.

Pat