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View Full Version : Maddie got knocked over by a bigger dog



MadPip
31st May 2011, 07:04 PM
This morning on our walk a very over-enthusiastic, over-friendly, out of control Staffie piled into Maddie knocking her flat on her side. There was no maliciousness, just an uncontrollable desire to say hello and play. Luckily she's ok, but as she only weighs 6.4kg and at a guess this dog weighs at least 18kg if not more it was more by luck than judgement. Then it tried to hump Pippin, and I hauled it off because he yelped. He doesn't normally mind being humped, but I think the size difference was just too much.

The problem is the dog just loves the world and the owner has no recall. We had to wait 5minutes for him to catch his dog up, put it on lead so we could walk away. Apart from the inconvenience of having to wait around when I dont have that much time in the mornings I'm worried that one of these days the dog will either inadvertently hurt another dog, or run up to the wrong dog and get hurt itself. There's nothing that training wouldn't sort out, but the owner isn't interested!!:sl*p:

Sorry for the rant, just felt the need to share.

Charlifarley
31st May 2011, 07:45 PM
I feel you pain. It's really frustrating when your dog has a bad experience with a bigger dog, inadvertently or otherwise.
I've noticed that a lot of these owners sometimes have a condescending attitude towards cavaliers (or maybe they have a 'cavalier' attitude with their dogs:p) but one way or another, it isn't pleasant to be on the receiving end of it.
I hope Maddie is ok.

GraciesMom
31st May 2011, 08:20 PM
Another Cavalier!! That lady who has the 2 bad temperament Cavvies is back to not putting them on leash. The female attacked Gracie off leash about 3 months ago. And now has already tried to bite another dog. Soooo... I am going to have another talk with her about the situation with the neighbor whose dog was more recently attacked. This will be a final warning!

Yes... I soooooo feel your pain. How sad that dog owners feel they have no responsibility.:( Even little dogs can be a danger if they are poorly socialized and left to their own devices.

meljoy
31st May 2011, 09:18 PM
Poor Maddie and Pippin, I hope they're both recovered after their experience. It's so frustrating when some one elses dog spoils what should be a pleasurable experience for you and your dogs.

Desrae
31st May 2011, 10:12 PM
So many of us feel your pain! That happened to meself and my furries just last week when we were spending a weekend in the west of Ireland at my husbands family home. These two dogs, one a staffie mix of some kind and another a lab came clambering towards us. I got really scared because last year a neighbour's Old English Sheepdog attacked our Bobby out of nowhere (he ran out of their house when their door was open). Anyway, any time an unleashed dog comes towards us I get scared (and nearly shield the dogs with my body lol). Our little girl was on the walk with us too, she got upset and screamed! Not good. The staffie mix and the lab were friendly but had no manners whatsoever. Poor things, the owner had no recall as well. As a rule, all dog owners should know to have good recall when walking dogs off lead. I've seen some dogs with really good recall, even I can't do that with my own! :shock:

MadPip
1st June 2011, 07:15 AM
We didn't see the dog this morning - I deliberately went out a bit earlier to avoid them. But, although Maddie just did her own thing as usual without a care in the world, Pippin didn't go too far from me all walk, which is unlike him. I felt he was quite unsure, which is a shame. I didn't make a fuss but carried on as usual. If I had more time in the mornings I'd be tempted to take a spare lead, catch the dog and bring it home and call the dog warden!!!

Sabby
1st June 2011, 09:08 AM
I am not surprised at this at all. I spend most of the week at training either agility or Rally Obedience. We have two huge fields where they can all run together. Mine are normally tiered after 2/3 hours being out so we don’t do that much walking in parks etc. When we do go to different places it always frustrates me that 70% of dog owners have not got a clue and most of the time don’t care that their dog has no recall. They say he/she eventually comes back. They don’t see that their dog is being a pain pestering other dogs and that one day it could have bad consequences for their dog. Trying to educate them is like talking to a brick wall. :bang:
Sorry this is turning a bit into a moan. I have even come to the conclusion that most people that own dogs shouldn’t own dogs. I was at the vets the other day and there was a couple with their daughter and they just bought a puppy. They were talking to another person and the other person was saying how cute the puppy was. The father said “ I wish we would have picked one that doesn’t bark and sleeps more” But you can’t tell can you when you pick a pup. I couldn’t help and tell them that they should have bought a gold fish. I felt like asking when your daughter was a baby was it inconvenient when she cried. You can see what is going to happen to that poor puppy.

Why on earth do people get dogs?

Desrae
1st June 2011, 10:22 AM
[QUOTE=Sabby;391769]I am not surprised at this at all. I spend most of the week at training either agility or Rally Obedience. We have two huge fields where they can all run together. Mine are normally tiered after 2/3 hours being out so we donít do that much walking in parks etc. When we do go to different places it always frustrates me that 70% of dog owners have not got a clue and most of the time donít care that their dog has no recall. They say he/she eventually comes back. They donít see that their dog is being a pain pestering other dogs and that one day it could have bad consequences for their dog. Trying to educate them is like talking to a brick wall. :bang:
Sorry this is turning a bit into a moan. I have even come to the conclusion that most people that own dogs shouldnít own dogs. I was at the vets the other day and there was a couple with their daughter and they just bought a puppy. They were talking to another person and the other person was saying how cute the puppy was. The father said ď I wish we would have picked one that doesnít bark and sleeps moreĒ But you canít tell can you when you pick a pup. I couldnít help and tell them that they should have bought a gold fish. I felt like asking when your daughter was a baby was it inconvenient when she cried. You can see what is going to happen to that poor puppy.

Why on earth do people get dogs?[/QUOTE

:xctly: I agree with you 100%. Most people shouldn't own a dog. Most people in my neighbourhood have dogs, and I would say about half of them should NOT have one, it makes no sense at all. But sometimes I wonder why some people have children when they shouldn't have that either! Ah, but this is a rant. The world is a strange place. Just be proud that you try your best to be a good, kind and responsible pet owner.

murphy's mum
1st June 2011, 11:40 AM
But, although Maddie just did her own thing as usual without a care in the world, Pippin didn't go too far from me all walk, which is unlike him. I felt he was quite unsure, which is a shame. I didn't make a fuss but carried on as usual.

Murphy was the same after meeting an aggressive GSD in the field behind our house. We came over the top of the rise, and we were met by a large white GSD who rushed us barking and growling. The guy who was walking it and black Lab, shouted "it's okay she wont bite she's just nervous" Murphy and Misty froze in place and I couldn't pick them both up, I just stood in front of the dog until he could get it to recall. I might add that he never bothered actually coming to get it but just kept shouting on it:mad:

For about a week after that I had to put Murphy on his lead to get him to go over the hill, and he kept to my heels all the way until we were on the turn for home. The dog is still walked round the field but normally really early or late at night, so we hardly ever run into it. If we do I just pop them on their leads and go the opposite way as I have no confidence in his control of the animal.