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Zumie05
12th June 2011, 03:37 AM
I heard about a four year old rescued tri colored 23lb ex-stud Cavalier, named Joe, from a puppy mill was going to be in town today at an adoption event and I decided to check him out.

After talking to the rescue organization, I had learned that he was a very special needs case; he is not potty trained or leash trained and is frozen with fear. They have not been able to get him to go potty outside yet, he will only go in a kennel. So sad..

They took him out so I could meet him and he is not aggressively fearful, just sudden movements scare him and he doesn't run up to say hi to everyone like a typical cav. He lets you pet him, hold him, look at his teeth, ears, feet, etc. I think he just doesn't know what it is like to be loved. Joe does however get along fine with other dogs of course, that is what he is used to. I did fill out foster paperwork. I definitely do not want to run out and just adopt or buy another dog, I just want to help, and Joe needs help.

He had 15 teeth pulled, is very thin, losing hair in places, and has incredibly nasty ear infections.

I left and came back an hour later with Coco and WOW they love each other. Even all the staff there said that Joe hasn't perked up like this at all. I thought it was possible because she is an in-tact female that may comfort him (yes he is neutered, yes Coco will be spayed if we do not end up showing her). He even WALKED on his leash willingly along side with Coco. I had my fiance come over, and Joe went up to him and placed his head on his lap, and his tail started wagging for the first time the staff had seen. It seemed special.

The sad news is because I am not an experienced foster, they feel Joe might be too tough of a case for me...they initially really wanted me to foster him because he hit it off so well with Coco and my fiance and in the end decided it was a no, but if any other Cavaliers come up in need of fostering they would let me know.

I just hope poor Joe can learn to be loved!

goda
12th June 2011, 04:23 AM
I heard about a four year old rescued tri colored 23lb ex-stud Cavalier, named Joe, from a puppy mill was going to be in town today at an adoption event and I decided to check him out.

After talking to the rescue organization, I had learned that he was a very special needs case; he is not potty trained or leash trained and is frozen with fear. They have not been able to get him to go potty outside yet, he will only go in a kennel. So sad..

They took him out so I could meet him and he is not aggressively fearful, just sudden movements scare him and he doesn't run up to say hi to everyone like a typical cav. He lets you pet him, hold him, look at his teeth, ears, feet, etc. I think he just doesn't know what it is like to be loved. Joe does however get along fine with other dogs of course, that is what he is used to. I did fill out foster paperwork. I definitely do not want to run out and just adopt or buy another dog, I just want to help, and Joe needs help.

He had 15 teeth pulled, is very thin, losing hair in places, and has incredibly nasty ear infections.

I left and came back an hour later with Coco and WOW they love each other. Even all the staff there said that Joe hasn't perked up like this at all. I thought it was possible because she is an in-tact female that may comfort him (yes he is neutered, yes Coco will be spayed if we do not end up showing her). He even WALKED on his leash willingly along side with Coco. I had my fiance come over, and Joe went up to him and placed his head on his lap, and his tail started wagging for the first time the staff had seen. It seemed special.

The sad news is because I am not an experienced foster, they feel Joe might be too tough of a case for me...they initially really wanted me to foster him because he hit it off so well with Coco and my fiance and in the end decided it was a no, but if any other Cavaliers come up in need of fostering they would let me know.

I just hope poor Joe can learn to be loved!

What a bummer! You have a healthy happy dog and that should be proof enough that you are responsible and loving dog owner. How are you supposed to get experience fostering a dog? I mean really sometimes these people drive me nutters!

Zumie05
12th June 2011, 04:50 AM
I think their fear was to make sure Joe will not move from foster to foster in case he is too much work. It is a lot of stress for dogs to move around constantly. I think an un potty trained dog is something I can handle, but they feel that he isn't just un trained, that he will ONLY go indoors and soil himself making himself messy, not on a pad or anything as that is what he was used to for his entire life so far. Maybe we will be able to help out once he gets the idea that it is ok to potty outside and keep clean :) They have told me they spend hours outside with him even after a meal or drinking and he just will not go outside. I guess how I can see that this makes him a very special needs case...

Here is his listing: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/19783199

Teresa
12th June 2011, 07:44 AM
I actually think that is sad...you are probably the best person to foster this little lad!! The Cav you have now would be the best leader to show the new guy what is what :((

Kathleen
12th June 2011, 07:49 AM
Poor Joe. I can't believe how expensive his adoption fee is! Is this cost normal for U.S.A?

Nicki
12th June 2011, 10:37 AM
Thank you for thinking of fostering but I do think that Joe would be very challenging as a first foster and not good for someone with no experience - and TBH, you have not had a Cavalier for very long either. After your previous experience with your Rottweillier, which I am sure you would have told them about as they have to know ALL your past history with dogs, they needed to be sure that Joe would not be moved on if you felt you could not cope.

I'm sure there are other more experienced fosterers who would be in a better position to handle a dog with very special needs.

Perhaps you could spend some time at a shelter helping out, to give you more experience of rescue dogs and prove your commitment which would give the rescue more confidence to place a dog with you

meljoy
12th June 2011, 12:38 PM
I think Nicki's right. Its lovely of you to foster but Joe needs a lot of experience. It would be terrible if it didnt work and you had to give him back.
You have to think of Coco too, you dont want to turn her little world upside down.
Good luck

murphy's mum
12th June 2011, 02:14 PM
What a shame, but at least they are going to keep you in mind for another Cavalier in need :)

StillPooh
12th June 2011, 02:53 PM
When we first adopted Dillon, he was very similar to Joe, even with 3 months in a foster home after coming out of an Amish puppy mill (where he spent 5 years as a stud). In the first year especially he was a LOT of work. Hardwood floors and belly bands saved my life! Even with another dog to model behavior on, getting him housebroken was a long hard haul.

As rewarding as it was to see him turn from livestock into a loving pet, we didn't have it in us to do it again after he died last year (of inherited heart disease). Our current foster is an owner release. Much easier!

ppotterfield
12th June 2011, 06:26 PM
I don't know anything about the private rescue group that has Joe but $850.00 is a fairly high adoption fee for a dog that will need lots of special care. However, that is how some rescue groups fund their efforts, they charge fairly high adoption fees for purebred dogs of popular breeds in order to cover the costs for rescuing other dogs who may be more difficult to place.

In dealing with a rescue group, always do your homework and find out something about them. Some of the private rescues are in fact fronts for puppy millers, and are a way for them to place and make at least some money off of puppies and adolescents they were not able to sell for premium dollar or breeding dogs they no longer want to use. I am not saying that is true of this group -- I have not invesitgated them -- I just think we need to be careful that we are not supporting puppy millers through the back door.

Does anyone know if either Lucky Star or Cavalier Rescue USA have been contacted about this dog to see if they can help? They will not pay for the dog but they may well take him and place him in an experienced foster home.

Zumie05
12th June 2011, 06:38 PM
Poor Joe. I can't believe how expensive his adoption fee is! Is this cost normal for U.S.A?

No his adoption fee is definitely not typical. Most rescues are a 100 - 300 adoption fee. Ginger's Rescue here in Washington state is pretty notorious for their high adoption fees, however they specialize in rescuing from puppy mills, dogs in dire conditions, and death row dogs. They do spend a lot of money and this is why their adoption fees are higher... there is a lot of controversy about her pricing however. Either way, they save dogs and that is what counts.

I did volunteer at a shelter nearby me for just under a year about two years ago. I took pictures of the pets up for adoption and played with them, then went home to create their petfinder profiles.

Also with my Rottweiler, more so what happened with him is because his hip surgery was going to be around 10k, we were going to have him put to sleep. He would not have had a quality life at all if he did not have surgery. He needed it on his hips, shoulders, AND elbows. My fiance's parents offered to fund his surgery and adopt him, so we let that happen of course. He died at 3 years of age from kidney failure...his entire story is just heartbreaking.

I am thinking that maybe I can offer to help at their volunteer events to get the dogs adopted, and pet finder profile services :) Again I just want to help!

StillPooh
13th June 2011, 03:12 PM
Dillon's adoption through Lucky Star was $500 in 2005. That amount didn't even cover the cost of his very expensive vetting required before he could be adopted.

Cathy T
13th June 2011, 03:58 PM
Some of the private rescues are in fact fronts for puppy millers, and are a way for them to place and make at least some money off of puppies and adolescents they were not able to sell for premium dollar or breeding dogs they no longer want to use. I am not saying that is true of this group -- I have not invesitgated them -- I just think we need to be careful that we are not supporting puppy millers trhought the back door.



Very good point Phyllis. We have a byb who is notorious for doing this. She will post in the paper that she has "rescued" a dog when it is actually one of her own she is no longer using for breeding.


Most rescues are a 100 - 300 adoption fee

Not necessarily. I've rarely seen $100 fees but see more in the range of $300-$600 depending on the dog. I do think it's important to know that when you pay an adoption fee you are really making a donation that is going to help current and future dogs with expensive issues. I think Micah was $500 and I loved that I knew his "adoption fee" was going to help a dog that was in rescue at the time and going through a very expensive surgery.