PDA

View Full Version : High Value snacks



gamefanz
11th August 2011, 05:06 PM
We are in the middle of training Toby. So far we are giving little stars and blue buffalo training treats. Our trainer says that its good to have High value snacks too for distractions. I'm not sure what would be a good high value snack that is not high in grease, fat, calories and good for a dog. The trainer had us use cooked hot dogs, cheese and dog snacks. To tell you the truth the baggy smelled so bad that I actually felt sick. I'm not sure what kind of cheese he used or what form of hot dog but something was stinky. Trainer said he put it all together about 1/2 hr before class so it was fresh and refrigerated. Toby does get gas with high fatty treats especially moist treats.
Any ideas of what to use during training?
Becky

Sabby
11th August 2011, 05:44 PM
I don't know if you get these in the US.

Royal Canin Educ. They are new here and they say that 33 of these treats are equivalent to one sausage or 20gram of cheese. I thought they won't be any good but my dogs love them and they smell of chicken.

Brian M
11th August 2011, 05:52 PM
Hi
Have a look at http://www.ziwipeak.com/nzl/home.shtml they are available in The US
and my four all line up for them

Zumie05
11th August 2011, 05:54 PM
I use high value treats for practicing recall. Something like string cheese or hot dog tidbits, basically some sort of smelly people food that she would otherwise NEVER get from me. Its so useful if your dog learns the high value rewards only happen for things you need solid around distractions, because your dog has to make the decision which is more fun - going to you despite the distraction, or ignoring you and checking out the distraction. If you are not more interesting than the distraction, there is a problem!

gamefanz
11th August 2011, 07:05 PM
We do have Royal Canin here not sure on the treats. I will have to look. Thank you!
Becky



I don't know if you get these in the US.

Royal Canin Educ. They are new here and they say that 33 of these treats are equivalent to one sausage or 20gram of cheese. I thought they won't be any good but my dogs love them and they smell of chicken.

gamefanz
11th August 2011, 07:06 PM
Thank you! We have Ziwipeak at our Local dog store. I will check it out!
Becky




Hi
Have a look at http://www.ziwipeak.com/nzl/home.shtml they are available in The US
and my four all line up for them

gamefanz
11th August 2011, 07:09 PM
never thought of string cheese. I know he gets gas very easy so I wasn't sure about cheese. I have turkey hot dogs and might try those too. We are practicing the name game and fast sits. He is doing ok with it but sometimes the leaves rolling down the street are just too tempting to look at me.
Becky



I use high value treats for practicing recall. Something like string cheese or hot dog tidbits, basically some sort of smelly people food that she would otherwise NEVER get from me. Its so useful if your dog learns the high value rewards only happen for things you need solid around distractions, because your dog has to make the decision which is more fun - going to you despite the distraction, or ignoring you and checking out the distraction. If you are not more interesting than the distraction, there is a problem!

BrooklynMom
12th August 2011, 05:59 AM
Ahhh yes, the leaves! One would always wonder why Brooklyn chooses leaves over chicken...but it happens!!! Ha.

Brooky gets roast chicken for her recall...and only ever gets it for recall. Once she knows I have it, she comes every time...but we also train constantly! At the dog park, we do it about 15-30 times every time. I also make her sit and wait once we get into the dog park. I show her the chicken, ask her to sit and stay, take off her leash and say stay again. She then has to sit and wait until I say "okay!" and give her a piece before she runs and plays. That way we start right away with discipline (not crazy, hyper with her running away first). I like to have the control from the get go. And when she gets that fist piece of chicken from the start, she knows that i have it and Every time she will get it when she comes to me (even if she comes to me without me saying it, she gets a piece...though i try to say "come" as she is running!). This way "I" always equal a super yummy reward every time.

Other treats...I second Brian, Ziwi peak makes her very happy. Cheese too, just small little bits is enough, not chunks. Kangaroo jerky and meat will make her do backflips though (don't think you can get that there!). It is SO scented with a meat smell that she knows when it is out a mile away! It is rare that we have it around though, so chicken is usually what we use :)

And as you already know, make sure to modify her breakfast and dinner if you are doing lots of training so he doesn't get fed too much! When she was younger i also sometimes just measured out Brooklyn's food for the day and used it through the day to train...now that is working for your breakfast!

gamefanz
12th August 2011, 01:00 PM
Thank you for the advice and ideas. I will buy the Ziwipeak and try some chicken. I like that idea better than hot dogs, not really fond of hot dogs but if the chicken doesn't work the I will try them. I have training pouches that go on your belt loop. I will have to put a plastic baggy inside it to use the chicken.
Becky

Jay
13th August 2011, 12:39 AM
To tell you the truth the baggy smelled so bad that I actually felt sick.

I use a variety of treats when I train, several types of cheese, dried meats, etc. One of the treats I like to use is made with dried salmon. I personally don't like treat pouches because I can't get the treats out fast enough. I just toss the treats in my front pocket. You don't even want to know what dried salmon smells like when its been in your pocket for a while....dogs love smelly stuff.

Karlin
13th August 2011, 02:50 PM
A lot of trainers would say dried liver is probably one of the highest value treats. I usually found small bits of cooked sausage, or cubes of cheddar cheese worked well. If you have a dog that easily gets any kind of gastric upset or gas, I would avoid dairy products entirely.

The other thing is–the treats should only be about the size of a peanut–not a whole peanut in the shell but just an individual peanut at most–or say, 1 or 2 peas, so they shouldn't be adding a lot of calories on top of your dog's intake. Food treats aren't supposed to be large chunks, at least not for this tiny breed. And you also need to subtract the amount you expect you are going to be giving in training treats from the dog's overall daily intake, so on training days or while you are going through the process of house training etc., just feed your dog less and allow the treats to fill in that gap. This is actually what is suggested by trainers like Ian Dunbar anyway–don't give your dog meals in a bowl, instead use the pieces of dry food as training rewards throughout the day. A hungry dog will be pretty darn motivated by a single piece of dried kibble!

I've never actually bothered with buying lots of costly training treats. I have found that using cat food works perfectly–it is quite smelly (because cats like food to be smelly and so it is made this way), and it has a higher protein level than dog food, and the dogs love it–plus the pieces are really tiny and just the right size as training treats for a cavalier. Buying a single small bag of a good quality dried cat food like Royal Canin etc. will cost far less than the equivalent amount of tiny packages of expensive dog treats.

gamefanz
13th August 2011, 03:15 PM
I find that sometimes the pouch gets in the way but I am such a girlie girl that putting it in my pocket would be a no no :lol: My husband puts them in his pockets but when he gets home he has to pull out the pocket and empty the crumbs. I definitely don't want to know what salmon pockets smell like LOL
Becky



I use a variety of treats when I train, several types of cheese, dried meats, etc. One of the treats I like to use is made with dried salmon. I personally don't like treat pouches because I can't get the treats out fast enough. I just toss the treats in my front pocket. You don't even want to know what dried salmon smells like when its been in your pocket for a while....dogs love smelly stuff.

gamefanz
13th August 2011, 03:24 PM
Thanks Karlin. We are steering clear of cheese. Our classes are at lunch hr so he does not get a lunch when we go to training. I give less in his meals if I plan to do lots of training that day. Either the treats we give like little stars are so small to break or we cut up the treats to the size of a pinkie finger nail. We did buy the Ziwipeak treats and also buddy biscuits. We tried them both last night, it was like crack! He loved them! He tried stopping on our walks for eye contact and sits even before we wanted them just to get a treat LOL It was funny.
I plan to bake some chicken today and put them in baggies to freeze them. We will take some to our training class tomorrow. I'm sure that will be a huge surprise LOL
Becky



A lot of trainers would say dried liver is probably one of the highest value treats. I usually found small bits of cooked sausage, or cubes of cheddar cheese worked well. If you have a dog that easily gets any kind of gastric upset or gas, I would avoid dairy products entirely.

The other thing is–the treats should only be about the size of a peanut–not a whole peanut in the shell but just an individual peanut at most–or say, 1 or 2 peas, so they shouldn't be adding a lot of calories on top of your dog's intake. Food treats aren't supposed to be large chunks, at least not for this tiny breed. And you also need to subtract the amount you expect you are going to be giving in training treats from the dog's overall daily intake, so on training days or while you are going through the process of house training etc., just feed your dog less and allow the treats to fill in that gap. This is actually what is suggested by trainers like Ian Dunbar anyway–don't give your dog meals in a bowl, instead use the pieces of dry food as training rewards throughout the day. A hungry dog will be pretty darn motivated by a single piece of dried kibble!

I've never actually bothered with buying lots of costly training treats. I have found that using cat food works perfectly–it is quite smelly (because cats like food to be smelly and so it is made this way), and it has a higher protein level than dog food, and the dogs love it–plus the pieces are really tiny and just the right size as training treats for a cavalier. Buying a single small bag of a good quality dried cat food like Royal Canin etc. will cost far less than the equivalent amount of tiny packages of expensive dog treats.

Karen and Ruby
13th August 2011, 10:14 PM
Hiya

The best thing I EVER did was start making Liver Cake!

Its costs next to nothing to make and the Dogs go Bananas for it! I train twice a week and would pay a fortune if I bought ready made treats all the time.

I can make 1 Liver Cake for around £3.00 which lasts me 3 weeks ( I freeze it) it is high value enough to get Charlie to come off of chasing a bird which really is saying something!!!

There are plenty of recipes on the net or you could buy a Copy of Ruperts recipes available through Nicki!