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GreenDenmark
17th September 2011, 06:37 PM
I was preparing some health test before breeding my dogs.

The DNA test was excellent http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/showthread.php?38797-DNA-test.
Then this happend to Luna and ending the breeding plans http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/showthread.php?39437-Sad-end-of-August

The next examination for Coco was Patellar Luxation and the result 0/0 excellent !
Then eye examination and at last the heart.

The day before yesterday (Thursday) Coco and I went to the Vet to get her eyes examinated AND Tadaa... I drove crying away http://www.cavaliernet.dk/themes/cavaliernet/smileys/d6-1.gif I was so sad and can't remember when I was that last.
She have Retinal Dysplasia on the left eye http://www.cavalierhealth.org/retinal_dysplasia.htm nothing that bothers her or she will be blind when the times go.
But I can't breed her now or my morality didn't allow it.

I love both my dogs and I know they love me. Today I told they will get another puppy girl about summer next year. http://www.cavaliernet.dk/themes/cavaliernet/smileys/d4-1.gif

Kate H
17th September 2011, 07:17 PM
I'm so sorry at yet another disappointment for you. It really is becoming a nightmare trying to breed healthy Cavaliers. A friend of mine who has worked hard (and on the whole very succcessfully) for years to breed healthy Cavaliers is probably going to give up - mainly because completely out of the blue a puppy she bred (from Grade A parents and grandparents, all with clear hearts and eyes) developed a rare but awful eye disease and hydrocephalous. She just feels she can't win, and doesn't want to breed dogs that will suffer. I do hope you will have more success with a new puppy:xfngr:

Kate, Oliver and Aled

mommytoClaire
17th September 2011, 08:21 PM
It certainly has been a tough month for you Torben. I'm sorry this has been a difficult road. Do you know if this is something that is genetic? Sorry, I'm not familiar with it. Take care if yourself, and a hug to the girls.

Desrae
17th September 2011, 08:51 PM
I'm so sorry about that, Torben. You must feel so disappointed and heartbroken. But Thank You for doing the right thing and choosing not to breed her. Don't give up yet, getting another pup next summer will give you all something to look forward to!

Nicki
17th September 2011, 08:58 PM
Oh Torben I'm so very sorry, it's just really frustrating when you are trying so hard to do the right things [and I truly admire you for that]. I can totally empathise as the same thing has happened to me too.


I'm glad you are having a new addition though, and paws crossed for her...




I'm currently trying to find a puppy or even slightly older dog for friends of mine, they have the most wonderful home to offer, but I can't find a puppy bred according to protocols in the whole of Scotland :( :mad::mad: The only ones I can find are over 600 miles away and it seems a bit unfair to transport a puppy that far.

sins
17th September 2011, 11:03 PM
That's very disappointing Torben.
I'm so sorry,I can undeerstand how upsetting this must be.
She's so beautiful too.
Sins

BrooklynMom
17th September 2011, 11:52 PM
Sigh, I am so sorry to hear about this! What a month :(

I guess there are two things...first, thank you for doing what you are doing in terms of their health, making sure they are sound and will produce healthy, beautiful children. I know that dream cannot come true for you right now, but I bet there are some people out there who would breed anyway and not even bother to go to all this trouble you did as long as they "looked healthy". So good on you.

I am so sorry it has been a struggle though, must be really hard. Your girls are very lucky to have you though!!!

Karlin
18th September 2011, 11:50 AM
I know another breeder in similar circumstances here and other good breeders in such situations and it is so disappointing and daunting. Thank you for keeping health a priority.

I think what makes the situation so frustrating is that there's a high incidence of so many of these issues (no) thanks t to many decades of indiscriminate breeding where few tested their breeding stock or took responsible decisions such as you have done -- and problems such as these now are pervasive and make it difficult for the truly responsible and committed breeders to find dogs who do not fail what should have been routine tests over the years.

The issue is complicated by the growing evidence that some endemic problems are likely linked to the things breeders breed FOR in terms of appearance -- the shorter muzzles of cavaliers are now known to seriously alter the internal anatomy of the head and this seems almost certainly a cause of PSOM and perhaps non-PSOM early onset deafness in the breed, and also seems likely to be linked in some way to CM/SM as well.

Some of the eye issues seem connected to breeding for those large eyes which are so characteristic yet create problems with dry eye etc.

I think tackling these problems long term and the survival of the breed will mean a reconsideration of some aspects of appearance in the breed just as is beginning to happen with some other breeds, where the breed standard is being modified.

It is just so complicated and I hope for the sake of this wonderful breed, that answers are found and that healthful breeding is (someday) supported in every way by all clubs. Some of the Nordic clubs are leading the way on health issues.

GreenDenmark
3rd October 2011, 09:48 PM
Even on a vacation I can't leave CT icon_blshing
Yesterday I got a mail from the breeder where Coco is from. She got her dog eye examinated and it was clear. The Father is also clear for sickness.
I'm little bit chocked over the result.
Even when both parrents is testes OK, then it still possible to get a puppy with RD.

sent from my iPhone using my left index finger..

sunshinekisses
4th October 2011, 04:40 PM
I am confused...I thought we were allowed to discuss breeding, but here it is.

WHY do you want to breed? There are other reason than health of the breed to desire to breed a litter. Do you show your dogs in conformation or obedience. Do your dogs adhere to the breed standard? Are you willing to be a home for all the puppies you bring into the world, no matter what age the owners decide they can no longer care for the dog? Do you have the money to afford the vet care, and everyday needs of the litter and mother? Are you able to find good responsible homes for the pups? Assuming from your post you are able to health check patella, hips, eyes, heart and MRI. A good breeder breeds a litter for themselves first. If you are breeding to spread the joy of cavaliers into the world you are not doing anyone a favor.

GreenDenmark
4th October 2011, 07:49 PM
Sorry I am confused now and english is not my native language.
But What do you mean with your post ?

Margaret C
4th October 2011, 11:15 PM
I am confused...I thought we were allowed to discuss breeding, but here it is.

WHY do you want to breed? There are other reason than health of the breed to desire to breed a litter. Do you show your dogs in conformation or obedience. Do your dogs adhere to the breed standard? Are you willing to be a home for all the puppies you bring into the world, no matter what age the owners decide they can no longer care for the dog? Do you have the money to afford the vet care, and everyday needs of the litter and mother? Are you able to find good responsible homes for the pups? Assuming from your post you are able to health check patella, hips, eyes, heart and MRI. A good breeder breeds a litter for themselves first. If you are breeding to spread the joy of cavaliers into the world you are not doing anyone a favor.

An interesting question.

At one time, as a very occasional breeder, owner of a top stud dog and a keen show exhibitor, I would have thought the same. No one should breed unless they want a puppy for themselves ( but it is amazing how many litters these good breeders can produce and sell before they find a puppy good enough to keep for themselves )

I have however always had good friends that bred just because they loved puppies. They did every health test and picked the buyers of their puppies very carefully.

Now I believe that in the search for show wins health is often compromised. Breeding healthy pets for families now seems to be a much more praiseworthy aim.

As whatever happens people will continue to buy the sweet little companion dog that is called a cavalier, perhaps we need to encourage younger people that are willing to health test and breed ethically, for whatever reason they are doing it.