PDA

View Full Version : Reacting badly to shots!



Nalu
4th October 2011, 02:22 AM
Four hours ago Nalu had a routine checkup and ended up getting a shots for Lymes and Leptospirosis, and a dose of FrontLine. She currently is hiding under the bed shaking a bit and her eyes are huge. Something isn't right and it's 7:30 p.m. so I wonder if I should contact emergency vet services. Thanks for any help! I washed off the area Frontline was applied, and I'll watch her closely.

waldor
4th October 2011, 04:36 AM
You might call the vet or an emergency pet clinic and talk to them, just be be sure she'll be okay. Peace of mind, and all that... I have been told the Lepto shot can cause reactions in some dogs, especially on top of all the other stuff when they get all their shots at the same time.

When we had our Shih Tzu, I faithfully let the vet give him a vaccination every year for every possible ailment. When Alex got older, he started having a similar but milder episode like Nalu's. He just didn't seem to be doing right for a few days. A friend advised me to split the shots next time, and my vet was fine with that. The vet told me it was probably the Lepto on top of everything else, that caused Alex to do poorly for a couple of days, so the following year Alex got one round of shots, and I waited three weeks, and then he got the rest. That worked well for him.

With Sophie and the internet, I've learned a lot and had her titered this year, instead of having her receive all those shots. She had to get the 3-year rabies, but titer results showed she still had immunity for the other stuff, and she didn't need more shots. I won't let Sophie have the Lepto shot because she's always on a leash and I don't let her drink from puddles.

Reptigirl
4th October 2011, 04:40 AM
I've also heard of bad reactions from the lepto. It's' always better to be safe. It wouldn't hurt to have an after hours clinic check her out.

Did they do the vaccines in the shoulder? I know with Cavaliers especially you want to try to avoid vaccinating in the neck/shoulder areas.

gamefanz
4th October 2011, 04:50 AM
I agree with the above. My breeder and vet both said NO to lepto. I would take Nalu in if she is still not feeling well.

Becky

ashleighelizabeth
4th October 2011, 05:07 AM
My breeder also told me no Lepto. He said that one of their puppies from a past littler had had a bad reaction.

However, Sonny has even reacted strangely both times he got his DHPP shots. We thought it was just a coincidence the first time, but then when it happened again we have decided he definitely reacts to the vaccine. He wasn't acting sick, but he was VERY hyper. He also seemed almost anxious. We put him in his crate like we always do at night and both times he barked and cried even though he usually does just fine. The second time I ended up sleeping in his bedroom with him in the bed with me because he was acting so strangely. The whole night he couldn't seem to settle down. He just moved around constantly and would sigh a lot. I'm not anticipating his last round of vaccines next Monday......:*gh:

I would check in with an emergency vet hospital just to make sure, maybe you can just call the hospital to explain her behavior and then they can tell you whether or not to come in.

Sabby
4th October 2011, 10:08 AM
How is Nalu?

Lepto can give a bad reaction. I don't give them Lepto anymore as even the vet said that there are so many different strains of Lepto and the vaccine only covers a few. Also my vet said not to give vaccines and things like frontline on the same day. I also don't booster anymore I just have the blood tests done.

Nalu
4th October 2011, 03:36 PM
I really appreciate all of the feedback. I've not heard of titering. Are the vaccines diluted or are they given every several years vs. annual? I live on damp clay soil on Lake Superior, a huge body of water with lots of great dog beaches, so the Lepto was recommended. Nalu is doing just a bit better, but remains very withdrawn. I checked on her during the night. My vet opens in 30 minutes and I will take her in to be checked. (We don't have a vet hospital, just expensive after-hours service.)

ashleighelizabeth
4th October 2011, 04:39 PM
I really appreciate all of the feedback. I've not heard of titering. Are the vaccines diluted or are they given every several years vs. annual? I live on damp clay soil on Lake Superior, a huge body of water with lots of great dog beaches, so the Lepto was recommended. Nalu is doing just a bit better, but remains very withdrawn. I checked on her during the night. My vet opens in 30 minutes and I will take her in to be checked. (We don't have a vet hospital, just expensive after-hours service.)

Hope Nalu is feeling better this morning! Let us know what the vet says. I am interested to see what they do for reactions to vaccines.

Nalu
4th October 2011, 05:01 PM
Hope Nalu is feeling better this morning! Let us know what the vet says. I am interested to see what they do for reactions to vaccines.
The vet prescribed baby aspirin (one 80 mg orange flavor St. Joseph without coating now and tonight) or a plain over-the-counter benedril (full 25 mg dose now and just a half dose tonight) for fever and achiness. I need to watch for any vomiting and diarrhea.

Mindysmom
4th October 2011, 06:24 PM
I have been told that there is a homeopathic medicine called Thuja that the vet can give you to administer to your dog before shots. I haven't used it myself but plan to ask my vet about it prior to Rylie's next vaccine because he has had reactions to his rabies vaccine both times he's had it.

ashleighelizabeth
4th October 2011, 06:43 PM
Thanks guys! I will definitely have Benadryl on hand and look into the homeopathic medicine for Sonny's final round of shots.

Is Nalu doing better after getting the medicine? Poor little thing.

Nalu
4th October 2011, 07:12 PM
My vet also recommends Nalu take an aspirin before getting shots next time. I worry about her reaction to aspirin though since she is so sensitive to everything. I don't want to worry about stomach reactions so I'm definitely interested in checking out Thuja. Nalu went into her crate (which she never does voluntarily) and was shivering away so I gave her a wool blanket. Hope she recovers soon.

Nicki
4th October 2011, 09:48 PM
So sorry to hear this - however PLEASE in future if a dog has a reaction to a vaccine, at the very least telephone the vet...reactions can sadly be fatal in some circumstances. However some dogs just feel a bit rough for a few days.

Always stop at the vets - even in the car park - for a good ten minutes. Major reactions occur very quickly and with prompt treatment can be quickly resolved - they can go into anaphylactic shock which needs urgent treatment.

Ask your vet to inject in the front of the thigh rather than the back of the neck, Cavaliers have enough problems in that area :(

Yes do use Thuja - one dose 1/2 hour before and immediately after - it is also good for reactions following vaccination. You can get it from most homoeopathic suppliers, I but from www.gentletouchremedies.co.uk

This is actually taken from a horse site:

Thuja Occidentalis - Arbor Vitae This remedy is most often prescribed for the ill effects of vaccination. Its main action is on the skin and genito-urinary organs. Symptoms include warts, polyps, lameness in tendons and muscles which is worse in damp weather, rapid exhaustion and emaciation, chronic nasal discharge, chronic diarrhea, distended abdomen, colic, inflamed ovaries, chronic uterine infection, poor quality hooves and swollen glands.

hence the reference to hooves!

http://www.holistichorsekeeping.com/resources/articles/vaccinationproblems2.html written by a vet.


I strongly recommend that people read the chapter on Vaccination in this book

Homeopathic Care for Cats and Dogs: Small Doses for Small Animals [Paperback]
Don Hamilton (Author), Richard H. Pitcairn (Author)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Homeopathic-Care-Cats-Dogs-Animals/dp/1556439350/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317757543&sr=8-1-fkmr1


If you search on the forum you will find many discussions about vaccination, we recommend that people read Jean Dodds' site

http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODD...-PROTOCOLS.HTM


Obviously it is a matter of personal opinion and you need to do your own research and think carefully about decisions [also check with your pet insurance company].

waldor
5th October 2011, 04:52 AM
You may want to Google titering, and do some research on it. If Nalu is old enough, the titering (blood test for antibodies) may be something to consider for her. It is not cheaper than all the shots, at least not at my vet, but I'm not putting vaccinations into Sophie that she does not need. Sophi had no reactions to her puppy nor final adult boosters, and she is the first dog in my life that I chose to have titered. I'll continue to do it, since she has many allergies and sensitivities. Everyone has to make their own decisions about what they believe is best for their dog. There is no right or wrong; just what one prefers to do.

Nalu
5th October 2011, 04:52 AM
The baby aspirin seemed to help Nalu feel better. I'm really upset that vets don't automatically space out vaccinations for small dogs and discuss the risks.

Karlin
5th October 2011, 06:08 PM
I would strongly agree that if anyone ever sees any kind of unexpected reaction to a vaccine, get an emergency vet on the phone if it is out of hours. Reactions can very quickly become fatal in the small number of dogs that do have a reaction. One reason why it is generally better to have a vet do a vaccine than to self administer is that if there is a reaction -- and severe reactions tend to happen very quickly -- the dog will have a good chance of surviving. It is generally considered a quite serious issue and so getting vet advice is really, really important if anyone sees a significant reaction/change in behaviour once their dog is back home. :thmbsup:

I know people often come here for advice before ringing a vet or acting to get a dog to a vet, but I really want to stress again that none of us here is a vet or can diagnose from a board post, and there's no guarantee that the advice given is the right advice.

In general, when there's odd behaviour, distress, significant illness -- it is just so critical, and may be the difference between a living or a dead cavalier! -- to get professional advice. :thmbsup: Vet offices generally will tell you right away if the dog needs to come in and if there is anything you can do to give emergency treatment that may help relieve distress or even save the dog's life. All of us should choose a vet where we have the relationship that enables us to call them and get good advice. :) I would also only ever use a vet that has an out of hours emergency service as well. I have needed to use this twice -- for phone advice -- and it was very reassuring to get pro care on what signs to watch for that would signal I needed to get my dog into the vet office. :)

In future, I def would not give two vaccines plus Frontline at the same time -- that is a really hard hit on the immune system, and you are right to wonder why vets do this :(. If lepto and Lyme are considered critical for your area, I'd do them two-three weeks apart and wouldn't ever Frontline at the same time. I think Lyme is quite controversial as a vaccine? Might be worth researching whether it is actually needed.

Karen and Ruby
5th October 2011, 10:50 PM
I would strongly agree that if anyone ever sees any kind of unexpected reaction to a vaccine, get an emergency vet on the phone if it is out of hours. Reactions can very quickly become fatal in the small number of dogs that do have a reaction. One reason why it is generally better to have a vet do a vaccine than to self administer is that if there is a reaction -- and severe reactions tend to happen very quickly -- the dog will have a good chance of surviving. It is generally considered a quite serious issue and so getting vet advice is really, really important if anyone sees a significant reaction/change in behaviour once their dog is back home. :thmbsup:

I know people often come here for advice before ringing a vet or acting to get a dog to a vet, but I really want to stress again that none of us here is a vet or can diagnose from a board post, and there's no guarantee that the advice given is the right advice.

In general, when there's odd behaviour, distress, significant illness -- it is just so critical, and may be the difference between a living or a dead cavalier! -- to get professional advice. :thmbsup: Vet offices generally will tell you right away if the dog needs to come in and if there is anything you can do to give emergency treatment that may help relieve distress or even save the dog's life. All of us should choose a vet where we have the relationship that enables us to call them and get good advice. :) I would also only ever use a vet that has an out of hours emergency service as well. I have needed to use this twice -- for phone advice -- and it was very reassuring to get pro care on what signs to watch for that would signal I needed to get my dog into the vet office. :)

In future, I def would not give two vaccines plus Frontline at the same time -- that is a really hard hit on the immune system, and you are right to wonder why vets do this :(. If lepto and Lyme are considered critical for your area, I'd do them two-three weeks apart and wouldn't ever Frontline at the same time. I think Lyme is quite controversial as a vaccine? Might be worth researching whether it is actually needed.

A close friend of mine lost her Papillion last year after a bad reaction to a vacination. With in an hour she was dead. I second Karlins advice- time is of the essance in this situation!

Holly
6th October 2011, 01:18 AM
Here is some great info about the Lepto vaccination that a friend posted on another forum:

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/lepto-comeback/

http://www.2ndchance.info/leptospirosis.htm

waldor
6th October 2011, 11:14 PM
Holly - thank you for the links. Both articles are very informative.

So much depends on the dog's activities and possible exposure. While pushing for a lepto vaccination, our vet told me they've seen a few dogs die from Lepto and that it is a horrible death. They told me about two cases they had the year they were trying to convince me to vaccinate; one dog was allowed to run loose all the time, but the other, a Cavalier, died after our area floods occurred last year. The dog lived in an apartment complex but must have drunk from a flooded area or residual puddle, and caught it.
It is such a difficult decision regarding this vaccine!

Nalu
8th October 2011, 03:20 AM
Lots of really helpful information!! I'm so glad Nalu survived the night, and I now have to plan to keep her safe in a "lepto" environment. So many diseases to worry about...