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James
10th October 2011, 10:29 AM
Ben was attacked yesterday by a large grey dog, a weimaraner I think. I had him on a lead in the local country park when it walked up to us off the lead, its owners shouting it back, it did not look aggressive but immediately went for him, picking him up to its head height and shaking him like a rag doll, It was all over in seconds.
I took him to the emergency vets immediately, he has a tiny puncture wound to his right ear, a large puncture 1/2" to his back and is sore all over especially to his back which is very bruised.
Today he is hiding under furniture and obviously very sore and more worryingly not eating or drinking, I usually work mornings but have taken the day off to look after him, I hope that I can coax him to eat but I have just opened a can of dog food and he would not touch it, he usually gets dry food and sees canned food as something tasty.

sins
10th October 2011, 10:51 AM
That's absolutely horrendous.
Thank goodness his injuries,although bad enough, are not life threatening.He sounds very traumatised though.If he's not drinking by this evening,perhaps give the vet a call.
I hope the owners of the aggressive dog are taking responsibility for this.
Sins

Brian M
10th October 2011, 11:10 AM
Hi james

Poor Ben ,thankfully his injuries dont seem to severe ,if you see that dog again give
it a kick in the gxxxxxx from me to make it stay away .I would consider having a stout
wooden walking stick but these things attack without warning its hard to respond one
has to be so careful with our innocent little Cavaliers .

Bset Wishes to you James and Ben

BrooklynMom
10th October 2011, 12:46 PM
Oh poor Ben!!! I am so happy the physical injuries do not seem to be horrible, but it is another thing for the emotional injuries. Poor wee soul, what an unfair encounter. This happened to a friend of mine about a month ago, but she has a small Boston Terrier, it took it a lot better than I would ever imagine a Cav would. And what does one do in a situation like this? You were responsible with Ben on a leash, yet the other dog was the problem. I am so sorry :(

What did the owners do?

I bet Ben is feeling some shock which is why he is not eating. Keep at it, maybe try some scrambled eggs or chicken? He might not eat til after a good sleep. Oh, so heart breaking. I will be thinking of Ben and hope he gets better soon!!!

team bella
10th October 2011, 01:36 PM
Hi James

So sorry to hear that Ben was attacked, Weimaraners were originally bred as hunting dogs and can attack very quickly as I've seen myself.
Poor Ben is obviously very sore and upset as you are too. Maybe just try to give him little nibbles/treats that he might like. I'm sure he will improve in a few days. Did you get the details of the dog owners?
Our lovely breed always seem to be bullied and picked on by other breeds I think other dogs sense them as being a soft touch. I mentioned on a thread this morning that Bella was attacked by a toy poodle of all things, but luckly no damage. However I am considering purchasing a small riding whip, and keeping it up my sleeve or coat, to protect my girls as anything like that is distressing to all.
Let us know how he gets on :hug:

Margaret C
10th October 2011, 02:20 PM
Poor Ben, he must feel very traumatised. He may just need a little more time to sleep & get over the shock.

There are certain things that I have in my fridge or freezer that I fall back on when the dogs are obviously off colour.............

Try hand feeding him a little chicken if you have any, and perhaps some slightly warmed goats milk will get him drinking ( or cows milk as long as he is not sensitive to it )

If he continues to refuse liquids, which is the most worrying symptom, I might consider syringing a little amount of water, only a small drop at a time, into the side of his mouth.

Charlifarley
10th October 2011, 03:20 PM
Poor Ben and what a shock for you too. Thank goodness he wasn't injured more severly. it sounds like he is in shock now after the trauma.
Do you have any Rescue Remedy drops? A squirt in his water might help him-if he is drinking anything.
I hope he feels better soon.

James
10th October 2011, 03:36 PM
He ate a little chicken about an hour ago and I just have coaxed him to eat some of the canned food and he then drank for the first time since it happened.
He obviously very sore and stiff and has just gone back into hiding under the settee.
A neighbour is getting me more chicken
The police were informed so I will have to wait and see what transpires on that front.

I have never heard of flower remedies what are they?

meljoy
10th October 2011, 04:02 PM
James,
Im angered and appalled at your post. Poor Ben and poor you.
Leo was attatcked last year by a labrador which was off lead, luckily I had Leo on a lead so he couldnt run away as Im sure the b****y lab would have set up chase.:mad:

I hope you are ok as well as Ben as I was very shaken by the whole experience.
But I have to say not as shaken as the owner of the lab when I'd finished with him !!

team bella
10th October 2011, 04:16 PM
Ah good suggestion Charleyfarly, rescue remedy is supposed to be really good. James you can buy it in most chemists and its a case of adding a few drop to the water. It just helps the dog to relax and not feel so stressed. Its great for dogs and humans.
I'm glad he's had some chicken, hope he's better soon.

ashleighelizabeth
10th October 2011, 04:20 PM
I hope Ben feels better soon! Hugs from us. :hug:

LJW
10th October 2011, 05:13 PM
So sorry to hear about Ben. A neighbour's beautiful Labrador was attacked by some kind of terrier off the lead this week, the owner has a bitten thigh and the poor lab is in animal hospital with a chunk out of it's side. So irresponsible having these kind of dogs off the lead and uncontrolled. My tiny puppy Bobby would not have stood a chance. Hope Ben gets well soon x

ourempire
10th October 2011, 07:26 PM
Oh no, I am so sorry to hear that. Poor, poor Ben. I send you all my best thoughts and wishes :hug:

pippa
10th October 2011, 08:04 PM
Terrible thing to happen...poor Ben:( and poor you, you must have got such a fright!

Sydneys Mom
10th October 2011, 08:18 PM
How terrible for that to have happened. Hope he feels better soon

murphy's mum
10th October 2011, 08:28 PM
Oh no. I hope Ben is now feeling better.

It's terrible to hear of these attacks, people can be so lax at controlling their animals while they are running free :(

Chloeinalbany
10th October 2011, 08:57 PM
Hi James, so sorry to hear about Ben. Grrrrrrrr some dog breeds must be on leash at all times! Hence the proposal by one of the local MPs here (or was it by SPCA, I can't be sure now) that owner of particular breeds need to be "licensed", much more than what we currently pay for normal dog license to Councils. That way they understand the reasons why, and some of the money could go to insurance, 3rd party if you like. I agree with Brian, give it a good kick in the butt! You take care Ben, and get well soon.
--
Chloe, everybody's pal in Albany, Auckland.

Soushiruiuma
10th October 2011, 09:34 PM
Hi James, so sorry to hear about Ben. Grrrrrrrr some dog breeds must be on leash at all times! Hence the proposal by one of the local MPs here (or was it by SPCA, I can't be sure now) that owner of particular breeds need to be "licensed", much more than what we currently pay for normal dog license to Councils. That way they understand the reasons why, and some of the money could go to insurance, 3rd party if you like. I agree with Brian, give it a good kick in the butt! You take care Ben, and get well soon.
--
Chloe, everybody's pal in Albany, Auckland.

I will not advocate that some breeds should singled out. All pets should be leashed or otherwise restrained (in carriers, etc). I have known many vicious chihuahuas and dachshunds, and some very sweet German shepherds and other so-called aggressive breeds. All owners are responsible for keeping their pet(s) under control.

I'm very sorry about Ben. He didn't deserve to that. I hope he (and you) has a speedy recovery, physically and emotionally.

Desrae
10th October 2011, 10:01 PM
Oh my goodness! Poor dear Ben, and poor you having to go through this! I swear, some dog owners just don't take responsibility, I don't know if their dog had no history of this or what, but maybe should have been on a lead.

This happened to our Bobby last year, a neighbour's dog, an Old English sheepdog, who is locked in the back all the time, charged out of the house and attacked Bobby with no warning, I held tight to the lead and pushed away the dog whilst the owners just stood and watched. Very scary, and Bobby had no injuries, but was very afraid of going out the door for a few days thereafter.

A friend's dog, a little JRT, was killed in his own garden just a few days ago, some people (a certain type of people) were out walking with their greyhounds and they came into the property and grabbed the little fella and killed him. So sad.

Do let us know what happens with the Weimariner. It's such a shame how these things happen. I've been tempted myself to walk with a stick, just in case...

BrooklynMom
10th October 2011, 10:32 PM
Yes, that is the thing...it can happen with any dog at any time. That is what must have been so scary for you...you cannot tell from a distance what a dog might be like, I for one (based on my experience with them) would not have been nervous about a weimaraner off the bat at all! And on the flip side, one of Brooky's playmates is a pitt bull (now that sounds scary, to be honest, that is a breed I have been lead to be a bit frightened of), but this dog is docile and perfectly trained and so gentle. And a tinier than Brooky duchess hound tried to attack her last week. Geez, you just can never predict can you?! It is a sham because it is really the responsibility of the owners, full stop. Ben should have never gone through this if that dog's owners had just been responsible and had that dog on a leash.

I know when Brooklyn got nipped by the duchess hound, both dogs were leashed and it was clear from far away that we were heading towards each other and Brooklyn was pulling that way to say hi as she does to most dogs in the neighbourhood. But instead of telling us his dogs were aggressive, or crossing the street, or moving the dogs to his other side, the owner let it all play out til the snarled and attacked! I screamed so loud (because I am a bit scared of dogs anyway to be honest, as funny as that is) and the owner just looked at me and goes "they are aggressive, so" I was like "yeah, no s*&t!". I yelled at him that is was his responsibility to not lead his dogs to other dogs to 'see what happens' he needs to be responsible...but he just looked at me and walked away. It amazes me some people...

How is Ben going today?

Karen and Ruby
10th October 2011, 10:54 PM
This is horrendus, poor little man!! I hope he is feeling better today!

I would advise anyone with a suseptable breed like the Cavalier to get a really good book on canine body languadge.

I read these sorts of books all the time and look out for all sorts of different signs from strange dogs to assess whether they will be friendly or not, aggression and too playful etc etc.

There are a few that I have found tremendously helpful and I have managed on a few occasions to scoop my two out of danger and "touch wood" haven't been in a situation where they have been badly hurt-

Mental scars are a whole other story and you need to do everything you can now so as not to have this affect him in to his future.

You will probably find he will be very nervous around bigger dogs now for life.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_20?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=canine+body+language+a+photographic+guide +interpreting+the+native+language+of+the+domestic+ dog&sprefix=canine+body+language

The above book is expensive but a life long investment!!!

I can spot an aggressive dog 9 times out of 10 with in seconds of seeing them these days and I also spot the over the top dogs that aren't a good play mate for such little and fragile doggies too!!!

Ruby has very good "doggie language" and is forever sending signals to dogs when out and about but Charlie on the other hand has barely any!!

Some dogs are great talkers and others aren't and its the ones that aren't that are the worry!

ByFloSin
11th October 2011, 12:17 AM
I have been wondering all day how Ben is coming along. Of course I am so sorry for what has happened to him.

I am a hardliner about uncontrolled dogs I'm afraid. I would welcome a law which only allows trained obedience/Good Citizen Dogs to be off leash in any public place whatsoever. Anyone found in breach of this should be fined at least a thousand pounds or made to give up their dog. I don't believe there are many bad dogs, but bad owners are everywhere.

mommytoClaire
11th October 2011, 03:22 AM
I have been wondering all day how Ben is coming along. Of course I am so sorry for what has happened to him.

I am a hardliner about uncontrolled dogs I'm afraid. I would welcome a law which only allows trained obedience/Good Citizen Dogs to be off leash in any public place whatsoever. Anyone found in breach of this should be fined at least a thousand pounds or made to give up their dog. I don't believe there are many bad dogs, but bad owners are everywhere.

I couldn't have said it better. It's not bad dogs, but bad owners. And I am in total agreement, that 98%of dogs need to be leashed......and if you can't control your dog, DON'T HAVE A DOG!

When walking down the street I always put myself between Claire and a dog being walked. I know that Claire being a fairly fragile dog would be seriously injured by a medium sized dog. I on the other hand can SUE a stupid owner if I am bit or injured. Sounds tough, but I can't stand irresponsible pet owners.

Reptigirl
11th October 2011, 05:09 AM
I couldn't have said it better. It's not bad dogs, but bad owners. And I am in total agreement, that 98%of dogs need to be leashed......and if you can't control your dog, DON'T HAVE A DOG!

When walking down the street I always put myself between Claire and a dog being walked. I know that Claire being a fairly fragile dog would be seriously injured by a medium sized dog. I on the other hand can SUE a stupid owner if I am bit or injured. Sounds tough, but I can't stand irresponsible pet owners.

Agreed! I would much rather take the bite because at least I have a voice!

I hope Ben is feeling better today! Both physically & mentally!

lovecavaliers
11th October 2011, 05:37 AM
I agree with the above two posters. Jack has been bitten (emergency room 5 stiches bitten) by a supposedly friendly daschshund. Likewise, he has had little schitzus and other dogs growl at him for no reason other than walking by on a leash. Sometimes I think he is lacking the doggy languange or other times I wonder if it's because he is on so many meds for his CM/SM, maybe the other dogs sense something is off with him. Not sure but now no matter how friendly an owner says their dog is, unless I really know the dog, I always keep myself as a buffer between the two dogs. I figure I can have a lot more legal leg to stand on if I am injured and will less likely be seriously injured than if Jack is bitten.
Owners also need to be more aware and in control of their dogs.I always blame the owners, never the dogs. I live in NYC and everyone walks their dog since nobody has yards. Many owners walk them on long retractable leashed completely disregarding that there dog is 10 feet ahead of them on a crowded sidewalk while their busy chatting away on their cell phone. Can you tell this is a huge pet peeve of mine?, LOL

ANyway, I am glad Ben made it out ok and is eating/drinking some. Poor baby, he will need lots of TLC for a while.
Cavies are such a sweet and sensitive breed.

Karlin
11th October 2011, 06:32 AM
TBH I think it's the other dogs. While sometimes a pack of 'friendly' dogs in a home have been known to attack a dog with SM --though have rarely heard of this with cavaliers; more common with breeds like Yorkies -- a dog meeting another dog in a friendly situation should not be attacking in that way! :eek: A lot of owners think they have 'friendly' dogs when actually they are not very pleasant or well socialised at all. Often they are termed 'friendly' because they are friendly with a circle of dogs they already know but this is not proper socialisation or general dog friendliness -- just friendliness within a small group.

SophieLightyear
11th October 2011, 10:45 AM
I'm so sorry to hear this. I hope Ben is doing much better today.

Sadly it seems as though this is somewhat of a common occurence.

It happened to Benji when he was about 8 or 9 months old and he is now absolutely terrified of all other dogs, which makes walking him a little difficult. Not only did it scare him, he walked all the way home right next to me which he never does, but it scared me too. I now spend the majority of my time walking him looking out for other dogs because it means i have to put Benji on a short lead and coax him to keep walking otherwise he just stands there frozen to the spot.

Portia
11th October 2011, 03:08 PM
Oh no! Poor Ben! I hope he's doing ok and feeling a better.

susandavis1
11th October 2011, 03:40 PM
I hope Ben is feeling a bit better today. What an awful experience for you both

Desrae
11th October 2011, 05:49 PM
I must agree with this Flo, it's a hard line to take, but people who have their dogs off-lead should be 'licensed' to do so. Really, if they have them off lead, they should be able to produce a license from their pockets saying they and their dog have been trained and the dog is a good citizen, etc. etc. But then, how would it be enforced and would it be abused? Best thing is to always be VIGILANT and always be prepared. As one other poster said, I would put myself between my dogs and another, because I would have more legal standing on getting hurt... and... most likely to survive (please God). I'm an overprotective mother anyway!

We are all wondering about Ben, looking forward to an update soon.

Tania
11th October 2011, 07:54 PM
I am really sorry. Poor Ben! It does make me very cross owners who do not keep their dogs under control. I hope he is feeling a bit better. Gentle hugs to Ben :hug:

lindylou
11th October 2011, 10:16 PM
so sorry to hear about ben being attacked hope he gets better soooooooooooooooooon

James
11th October 2011, 10:42 PM
Thank you all for your kind words and advice, it is appreciated. Today Ben has made an improvement in his physical and in his mental state. He still spent the majority of the day squeezed tight under the settee but came out for chicken and came out into the garden of his own accord but just stood staring. His is still obviously quite sore and looks much older in appearance, the bite hole on his back has scabbed over and looks clean, he is on an anti-biotic medication and has an follow up appointment with the vet tomorrow. This evening he has been up beside me on the settee and is at present lying in the middle of the living room floor which is an obvious improvement.

The episode has made me assess meeting large dogs and from now on I will be avoiding them and/or picking him up as well as carrying a heavy stick. I also realise that he was lucky not to have been killed, He is a medium sized Cavalier, weighs 11Kg and I cannot believe how so easily he was picked up and violently swung from side to side like a rag doll, his neck could have been so easily broken.

BrooklynMom
11th October 2011, 10:51 PM
Thanks for the update, I have been thinking about Ben non stop. I hope each day he improves, it must have been so scary for him.

I think your story has shown us all something, and at times, we all need little reminders to keep our dogs safe. Sometimes it is easy to slip into "every dog is cute and safe like mine", but it is just not true. I am good at the dog park, asking people with big dogs approaching "is your dog okay?", but I am not good at all on walks. I figure, oh, Brooky is on a lead, we are fine....but you have shown us that is not always the case and I am grateful you shared your story, as hard as it is for you to have gone through.

We will be thinking about Ben on his recovery!

Margaret C
11th October 2011, 11:09 PM
I'm so glad Ben is feeling a little better.

People also need to be aware that having the dog in your arms is sometimes no help if the other dog is large, I have known a Cavalier attacked by a Great Dane even though it was being held by the owner.

Karlin
11th October 2011, 11:15 PM
An absolutely ghastly, horrific experience for you both. Glad he is gradually getting some confidence again and healing.

Soushiruiuma
11th October 2011, 11:41 PM
I don't think I could hit a dog with a stick. There are pepper sprays meant to use on attacking dogs. I don't know which would be worse for the dog, although a stick could turn a large dog lethal.

Perhaps others could comment on their opinions sticks v pepper spray, cruelty/defense, and effectiveness, or other alternatives to use in an emergency.

team bella
12th October 2011, 12:18 AM
Thanks for the update on Ben and I hope you are feeling better too. Any news on the police?


---
I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=56.482638,-2.845322

dozyrosy
12th October 2011, 01:13 AM
I'm really sorry to hear about the attack on Ben, and I'm relieved that he appears to be on the way to recovery. I know a little about how it feels to have this happen as one of my young Cavaliers was attacked and mauled and tossed in the air by an Alsatian when out with my husband. He just missed having his lung punctured, and both he and my husband were very badly shocked. My husband knew who owned the dog and was eventually in contact with our local police officer. The owner firstly denied any knowledge or responsibility but was finally persuaded to pay the cost of our vets bills (in the region of 100) by the police.

We had a couple of friends with large (and gentle) dogs who helped Rowan regain much of his confidence, but the experience actually changed his whole happy attitude to life, and this still makes me so angry 13 years on... It also affected how my husband reacted to strange dogs as well - and he still doesn't really trust them.

Rosemary

Karen and Ruby
12th October 2011, 01:16 AM
There was a very interesting article in dogs today magazine a couple of months back about what to do if a dog attacks your dog and it was a great read and very helpful.

The main point was to stay calm (easier said than done!!!) and not panic!

It describes how to get the dog to let go with out them turning on you in the process. I've not tried it but basically, rather than go in to break the dogs up, you get hold of the attacking dogs back legs and pull them up towards you- like a wheelbarrow.

You know the game you used to play as kiids where one kid holds the others back legs whilest you walk with your hands????

Then once you have hold of the legs you swing the dog in an outward circle away from the dog being attacked

You know if you have a small kid and you swing them round like a helicopter whilest holding under there arms....well like that but swinging whilest holding the back legs.

The dog cant reach you- as they can't twist while you're moving it- and the shock factor of what you are doing makes them release any grip they have on the dog being attacked.

Of course this is all just theory and most dog attacks are over very quickly so therefor wouldnt get the chance but if it goes on for more than a few seconds and it doesn't seem to be stopping then the above is the way to go.

I also read about carrying a very strong stick and placing it under the attacking dogs collar and twisting????

Petcorrecter sprays are available but im certain that most behaviourists will say that they aren't much good once an attack is under way but can be usefull to warn off an incoming dog!


I love dogs to the moon and back but if it came to protecting my babies I would kill for them!

lovecavaliers
12th October 2011, 01:42 AM
It is so sad that big dogs get such a bad wrap. I grew up with labs and German Shepards who were so sweet and gentle. In fact most of the dogs that snap at Jack are little toy dogs. The dog that bit him was a dachshund. HOWEVER, as we all know it can only take one bite from a big dog to cause serious possible deadly damage, thus I am always more leary around the larger breeds. It is a sad but true reality. I once had a man with two adult pitbulls lecture me when I pulled Jack away from a meet and greet session on the street. He said something like "not all pitbulls are mean and people like you perpetuate the stereotype". I felt bad because I love all dogs, but should something stir these owner labeled "friendly dogs" , I know one chomp and Jack would be done.

I appreciate the ideas above. One never knows how they will react in the situation. However, the technique for pulling the hind legs is a good one to store away in the back of my mind. One never knows when this information may be applicable and save a life. In the meantime, I just keep Jack on close lead and keep socialization to the neighborhood dogs I really know well.

Glad to hear poor Ben is seeming a little better today. I cringe everytime I read about him being shaken by the bigger dog. Give him lots of gentle kisses and hugs from Jack and I.

lscott
12th October 2011, 05:38 AM
My daughter's small Brittney Spaniel pup was attacked by a Pit Bull several years ago, while in her yard. The dog actually followed her boyfriend, who had picked up the pup when he saw the dog, inside the apartment building and tore the puppy from his arms, also biting him in the process. It was a pretty traumatic scene, but thankfully the police were near. Pepper spray had no effect on the Pitt, and sadly he was shot by the police to save the pup from literally being torn apart. The pup was badly bruised and had a puncture wound completely through his hind quarter, but did survive without any permenent physical damage. He remains fearful of unfamiliar anaimals. We later found out that the dog had previously attacked and seriously injured another dog, yet he was again unleashed on the street. Irresponsible owners are responsible for these types of tradegies.

Nalu
12th October 2011, 02:43 PM
Thank you for sharing this story. I've been too trusting and now know to be more protective. Give our best to Ben.

Nicki
13th October 2011, 09:17 PM
So sorry to hear about this Jim, I wrote you a long reply last night and it obviously didn't appear :mad:

How is Ben today?

It's good that he has started eating again, try softening his Burns with some warm water, if he is sore around the head area he might be finding it hard to eat hard food.


You can obtain something called Zylkene from your vet, that might help to calm Ben.

Rescue Remedy is brilliant, you can get it from your chemist. I put 3-4 drops in their water bowl, also put 2 drops in their mouth [be careful with the glass dropper] - can do this as often as every 5 minutes for up to an hour in an emergency situation.

Also a few drops of Lavender essential oil - again in chemist or health food shop - in the area he is lying is calming.




The episode has made me assess meeting large dogs and from now on I will be avoiding them and/or picking him up as well as carrying a heavy stick.

Please don't pick him up as that actually encourages other dogs to attack as it increases their interest, you are also putting yourself in danger too.

The best thing is stand still facing the oncoming dog, in dog behaviour this acts as a block [why people often have recall problems]


YOu are both in our thoughts, hoping that Ben will soon be feeling a lot better. Once he is a bit better, try introducing him to dogs he knows that will be gentle and build up from there.

Nicki
13th October 2011, 09:18 PM
You can learn more about flower remedies from this book http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flower-Remedies-Scott-Martin-Mariani/dp/184409099X/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318533456&sr=1-7

ByFloSin
14th October 2011, 09:28 AM
You can have no idea how much it distresses me to read of these awful PBT attacks. They are outlawed in the UK, but imported for breeding and fighting from Ireland. Unless detected at border controls and ports there is no way to stop this happening.

The fighting people openly boast on web sites about the ferocity of their animals, then mate them with others of similar calibre hoping to perpetuate the ferocity of the fighting strain.

You have no idea how much it distresses me or how many recollections run through my head every time I read of these attacks. That poor little pup is lucky not to have been more traumatised by the attack.

I carry a slim handbag sized aerosol of hairspray in my pocket when I am out with the dogs. Any nasty ones getting too up close and personal will get it full in the face and eyes. Rough justice yes, but if the owner cannot or will not control their dog then it is for me to protect mine.

LJW
14th October 2011, 11:43 AM
Someone told me to carry pepper spray in case me and Bobby are set upon by any vicious dog off the lead. Is this legal and if so, does anyone know how to get it?

dandelos
14th October 2011, 01:24 PM
Someone told me to carry pepper spray in case me and Bobby are set upon by any vicious dog off the lead. Is this legal and if so, does anyone know how to get it?

If you're in the US, laws/legality vary by state --

http://www.misdefenseproducts.com/Pepper-Spray-Laws-Restrictions-sp-6.html

Nicki
14th October 2011, 04:24 PM
In the United Kingdom, "Any weapon of whatever description designed or adapted for the discharge of any noxious liquid, gas or other thing" is a Prohibited Weapon, under S.5 of The Firearms Act 1968. The same act covers other prohibited weapons such as automatic firearms and rocket launchers, all of which can only be possessed by permission of the Home Secretary. Although legal for police officers, recent debates have arisen whether such a weapon should be legal for civilians as means of defensive purposes only.


This is effective for deterring dogs http://www.companyofanimals.co.uk/products/pet-corrector

Snakes, insects and birds such as geese, use their hiss sound to drive off predators and our domesticated pets have an instinctive sensitivity to this sound. The Pet Corrector emits a hiss of air which mimics this sound, to interrupt undesirable behaviours in dog.


I would not personally use it for jumping up etc but have carried it in the past when we used to walk near the house of some Collies that had previously attacked Rupert [and were often loose :(] It made them go away.



Please don't use hairspray, you could seriously injure their eyes and possibly be charged with assault :(


Always keep your height, and shout "NO" in a loud voice, it should halt the dog long enough to get your dog safely behind you. You need to project confidence.


As Karen says, learn to read body language - dogs that want to play have big, loose body movements. Dogs that may want to fight are much stiffer in their movements.

LJW
14th October 2011, 06:21 PM
Very good advice thanks. I will take a look at the corrector.

Calandra
15th October 2011, 11:28 AM
Hi James

However I am considering purchasing a small riding whip, and keeping it up my sleeve or coat, to protect my girls as anything like that is distressing to all.
Let us know how he gets on :hug:

I'm loving that idea - I'm thinking about pepper spray myself. I get so upset when an irresponsible owner has a dog off a leash and it injures someone. No excuse for that.

I'm sorry this happened to your dog, but so glad that it wasn't worse.

lscott
15th October 2011, 03:56 PM
I carry a slim handbag sized aerosol of hairspray in my pocket when I am out with the dogs. Any nasty ones getting too up close and personal will get it full in the face and eyes. Rough justice yes, but if the owner cannot or will not control their dog then it is for me to protect mine.


Please be extremely careful, especially with PBTs. The police used pepper spray on the dog attacking the pup, 3 times, spraying him full in the face. This only incited him more. I was told that if thye are fighters pain just increases their viciousness. The police really did not want to shot for fear of hitting the pup, but even if that happened at that point it would have been more humane then having him ripped apart by the other dog. The dog did bite Dave,, who was holding the pup,leaving a gash in his arm, also. Poor Dave, he didn't get to go to the hospital until after the pup was treated.

ByFloSin
15th October 2011, 10:36 PM
Please be extremely careful, especially with PBTs. The police used pepper spray on the dog attacking the pup, 3 times, spraying him full in the face. This only incited him more. I was told that if thye are fighters pain just increases their viciousness. The police really did not want to shot for fear of hitting the pup, but even if that happened at that point it would have been more humane then having him ripped apart by the other dog. The dog did bite Dave,, who was holding the pup,leaving a gash in his arm, also. Poor Dave, he didn't get to go to the hospital until after the pup was treated.

But surely the hairspray would temporarily blind the dog, so that he would not be able to see what he was doing, giving me or the person on the receiving end with a chance to get the hell out of there?

Karen and Ruby
15th October 2011, 11:09 PM
I have been thinking alot abut this over the last few days and it is worrying to think that even by holding your dog they could still be in trouble.

There are alot of 'pit type' breeds around where I am. I hear people bragging about their dogs all the time.

I have to be mega careful when I am out as I have 2 dogs to look after and I am on my own with them all the time, what would I do if something came on the attack- I couldn't pick both dogs up- thats over 18kg of weight and needless to say awkward! I often think I would dive on top of them both to sheild them but truth be told... who knows what I woud do In the thinck of it,

There is a certain stillness that a dog projects before it attacks. Perfect stillness! The ears are normally flat and the tail straight out with a slow wag at the tip back and forth. If they are on the lead they will be infront of an owner- straining with a pause and go motion of movement or a complete stillness. Owners that allow their dogs to stand and stare are making the problem worse as they are giving the dog time to get worked up. They should be turning the dog around and moving away- but if they dont then you need to get away!

If you ever watch nature programs and watch what Wolves/Hyenas/Coyotes do before they pouce, its the same thing.

I always canvas an area before I walk on to it (parks and so forth) if there is a loose dog on there that I don't know I walk another direction to go somewhere else.

If I have Ruby off lead and a dog comes on to the park that I dont know- I put her on and walk the other direction.

Dogs that turn their heads or bodys as they approach are generally a bit weary, sniffing the ground, avoiding eye contact and tail hug low- they are telling your dog that they mean no harm and don't want a confrontation.

Then there is the happy, overlly playful dog that is straining on the lead to get to your dog, tougue hanging out and nose on the go- they may be a bit much for a small cavalier to contend with in a play situation,

Please take the time to watch dogs when you are out and about- it is so very interesting and is the best lesson you ca ever have on reading a dogs way of talking!

Desrae
16th October 2011, 12:32 AM
I have been thinking alot abut this over the last few days and it is worrying to think that even by holding your dog they could still be in trouble.

There are alot of 'pit type' breeds around where I am. I hear people bragging about their dogs all the time.

I have to be mega careful when I am out as I have 2 dogs to look after and I am on my own with them all the time, what would I do if something came on the attack- I couldn't pick both dogs up- thats over 18kg of weight and needless to say awkward! I often think I would dive on top of them both to sheild them but truth be told... who knows what I woud do In the thinck of it,

There is a certain stillness that a dog projects before it attacks. Perfect stillness! The ears are normally flat and the tail straight out with a slow wag at the tip back and forth. If they are on the lead they will be infront of an owner- straining with a pause and go motion of movement or a complete stillness. Owners that allow their dogs to stand and stare are making the problem worse as they are giving the dog time to get worked up. They should be turning the dog around and moving away- but if they dont then you need to get away!

If you ever watch nature programs and watch what Wolves/Hyenas/Coyotes do before they pouce, its the same thing.

I always canvas an area before I walk on to it (parks and so forth) if there is a loose dog on there that I don't know I walk another direction to go somewhere else.

If I have Ruby off lead and a dog comes on to the park that I dont know- I put her on and walk the other direction.

Dogs that turn their heads or bodys as they approach are generally a bit weary, sniffing the ground, avoiding eye contact and tail hug low- they are telling your dog that they mean no harm and don't want a confrontation.

Then there is the happy, overlly playful dog that is straining on the lead to get to your dog, tougue hanging out and nose on the go- they may be a bit much for a small cavalier to contend with in a play situation,

Please take the time to watch dogs when you are out and about- it is so very interesting and is the best lesson you ca ever have on reading a dogs way of talking!

I have to agree with you, I've been thinking about this a lot too. There are often dogs straying while we are out, some have actually become 'friends' with my two, but then there are those, especially the ones who watch us through their fence and look quiet and still, focused. There is one in particular that we don't walk past the house anymore because the dog looked very menacing, and she's completely quiet and still with that stance. I'm afraid she'll jump her fence someday. Then there's the big labs across the road that bounce against their gate and bark to high heaven. It's a dangerous thing, having a dog, what a pity.
I don't like the idea of a whip or stick, but maybe the stick could put a barrier between the attacker and your own dog. I don't know. Being vigilant and aware at all times is best, but still there are no guarantees.

mommytoClaire
16th October 2011, 01:37 AM
Okay, I will say it. If it's me, and I fear an attack, I will do WHATEVER I have to do to protect Claire. That may mean damaging the other dog, and I will take my chances with the end results.

I am a HUGE animal lover, but the safety of people and small animals comes first. Sometimes dogs that attack are beyond saving due to damage done early in their life. And a dog that would attack a small dog would generally attack a toddler or small child.

And yes, small dogs can attack too. A family member had a dog that bit too many people to count. This dog had been through hundreds of dollars of training and behavior modification. His background was unknown as he ended up in a shelter early on, at maybe 2-3 years old. Even rescue didn't want him. He was a mess. When he became agitated it was like he was in another world.

It's just hard to know what to do, and it's a shame that we have to think about this. When I walk down the street with Claire, I put myself between her and anyone walking toward us. I hope never to have to face this issue.

Hope that Ben is improving every day, poor sweet dear!

LJW
16th October 2011, 09:45 AM
I'm going to get the 30ml corrector spray and keep it in my coat pocket as a precaution. I think avoiding likely situations is the most important thing, then reading dog behaviour and if then an awful attack does ever occur, will try the corrector spray and some karate kicks if necessary!

Nicki
16th October 2011, 10:31 AM
And yes, small dogs can attack too.

Yes people forget that - generally not Cavaliers though! I've known of a Jack Russell run through the legs of a very gentle GSD, and bite him badly underneath :yikes:(


And a dog that would attack a small dog would generally attack a toddler or small child.

I'm sorry I don't agree with this, dog aggression is very different from people aggression.

James
16th October 2011, 11:08 AM
Thank you all again for your kind words and comments. Ben has improved noticeably yesterday (Saturday) and today, considering that on Friday when I lifted him very gently and he screamed with pain, yesterday I took him in the car to my friends newly acquired farmhouse where to my surprise he chased one of the cats who obliged and ran, we have discovered that the four cats are tame,are all very dog friendly and do not see Ben as a threat, taking great pleasure in headbutting Ben and rubbing against him much to his alarm.
He also does not seem to have any fear of familiar large dogs and yesterday he met two collies that were new to him, he wanted to be friends with them as he usually is with strange dogs, it was me that was very wary.
The wider area swelling has gone down but he still has a 2" broad vertical swelling down his right side, and the single puncture wound on his left is healing well.
Conversely yesterday morning he had a panic attack when I covered him with the blanket that he normally buries himself under, I suspect that he remembers something coming from above and attacking him and possibly he does not realise that it was a dog and this is why he is not scared of them.
He is sleeping a lot but when awake has resumed his usual behaviour of accompanying me everywhere as well as constantly searching for food.

Desrae
17th October 2011, 06:40 PM
Good news about Ben recovering slowly but surely. On one hand, it's great he might not have realized it was a dog who attacked him and might be ok around them still.... but on the other hand, he may be frightened of other things that remind him of the attack (like the blanket).