PDA

View Full Version : Not exactly an owner.



Jacktr
4th November 2011, 04:57 PM
Greetings:
I'm not exactly a Cav owner. My son and daughter in law own a year old Cav. They also have a 2 month old baby girl. I have "minded" Winston several times, including this past week for about 8 days. Here is my issue/question: I love the dog, as does my wife, and the dog loves us, obsessively. But he seems to hate everybody else. When we walk he barks at all dogs, kids and adults. Anyone who comes near him. He makes life miserable for anyone that comes near him. (except us) Where do I start to help him and my son and daughter in law as well? They know he isn't "socialized", having lived in a city on the 3rd floor and not having been exposed to normal stuff and people and dogs. I am concerned that he will not enjoy all the things that dogs normally experience, and of course, they can't take him anywhere, and now have to lock him in a room when visitors arrive. I know this is a long story. Just trying to help. Thanks.

Jack T.

JessieAndMe
5th November 2011, 05:18 AM
Would you be willing to offer to care for the dog permanently? I think what you and your wife are doing is what the little guy
probably needs, I can imagine that having a little bubby, the family is probably overwhelmed and may not be able to give
Winston attention, which might be why he has such a strong bond with you and your wife. He's still young and probably feeling
out of sorts with the new addition, and must feel like he's being hidden away.

Sounds as though you adore him and vice versa. I'm sure someone far more experienced will be along to offer advice shortly,
just personally, I hope that you and your wife can permanently take him in.

penquite
5th November 2011, 10:27 AM
Greetings:<br>
I'm not exactly a Cav owner. My son and daughter in law own a year old Cav. They also have a 2 month old baby girl. I have "minded" Winston several times, including this past week for about 8 days. Here is my issue/question: I love the dog, as does my wife, and the dog loves us, obsessively. But he seems to hate everybody else. When we walk he barks at all dogs, kids and adults. Anyone who comes near him. He makes life miserable for anyone that comes near him. (except us) Where do I start to help him and my son and daughter in law as well? They know he isn't "socialized", having lived in a city on the 3rd floor and not having been exposed to normal stuff and people and dogs. I am concerned that he will not enjoy all the things that dogs normally experience, and of course, they can't take him anywhere, and now have to lock him in a room when visitors arrive. I know this is a long story. Just trying to help. Thanks.<br>
<br>
Jack T.


Hi Jack
I am sorry to hear of your problem.
It sounds very much like lack of socialisation as a young puppy. He is obviously very worried and stressed when faced with new situations and people. Unfortunately locking him away is only reinforcing his worry and fear. You will need to go very slowly and carefully about trying to sort this out. Your son and daughter-in-law or your selves need to try to make time to take him to training classes. This would help introduce Winston to other people and dogs under controled circumstances and teach him not to be frightened of others. Try taking him to places (for short periods, at first) where there are a few people and dogs, but just sit quietly with him and reassure him that all is OK. Praise him when he does not bark. I used to sit at the end of our drive with small puppies to let them see the world go by and meet people and dogs. That is what Winston has missed out on and now needs. Throwing him at the deep end, so to speak, will not work. It will be a lond slow progress. Hope this helps a little. I am sure others will have more ideas to help

lucidity
5th November 2011, 03:27 PM
If you or your son can't afford a trainer, or don't have the time for one, you can try to socialize the dog yourself. It's going to be harder than socializing a puppy, but it's definitely doable.

Most important thing is to ALWAYS have treats handy. Preferably treats that the dog really loves. The goal is to associate strange things with a positive reinforcer (i.e., food). Cavaliers usually LOVE food so it shouldn't be hard.

For instance, when you are out for a walk, and you see someone walking down the street, far away. Teach the dog to pay attention to you when you say his name, and give him a treat whenever he stops paying attention to the person/strange thing and looks at you instead. Praise excessively. Be extra aware of your surroundings. Ideally, you want to notice the strange thing BEFORE the dog does, so that you can start getting his attention before he becomes too focused on barking.

Start with bringing him on walks in deserted streets/areas first, instead of busy streets. That way, there are not so many strange things you have to keep a look out for.

Same thing for when people come over. Put him in a sit-stay, keep praising/treating. Get the guests to give him treats as well so that he associates strange people with good things (treats). Basically, you want to reinforce good behaviour (whenever he pays attention to YOU instead of a strange thing, give a treat), and get him to stop focusing on whatever is triggering his barking. Calling his name and redirecting his attention to you to get a treat is a great way to get him to stop paying attention to whatever is making him bark.

Jacktr
5th November 2011, 04:49 PM
Thanks for your thoughtful reply Jesse (andme) Have to think that one over for a while. I'm sure they truly love Winston and probably not thinking about giving him up. But I can see why you suggested that. Who knows, maybe I will post again with some good news. Thx.
Jack


Would you be willing to offer to care for the dog permanently? I think what you and your wife are doing is what the little guy
probably needs, I can imagine that having a little bubby, the family is probably overwhelmed and may not be able to give
Winston attention, which might be why he has such a strong bond with you and your wife. He's still young and probably feeling
out of sorts with the new addition, and must feel like he's being hidden away.

Sounds as though you adore him and vice versa. I'm sure someone far more experienced will be along to offer advice shortly,
just personally, I hope that you and your wife can permanently take him in.

Jacktr
6th November 2011, 04:27 PM
Sounds like we have our trainer. All of your advice is strong. Sounds simple too. Will pass along to them. Thanks so much to you and others here, all good tips.


If you or your son can't afford a trainer, or don't have the time for one, you can try to socialize the dog yourself. It's going to be harder than socializing a puppy, but it's definitely doable.

Most important thing is to ALWAYS have treats handy. Preferably treats that the dog really loves. The goal is to associate strange things with a positive reinforcer (i.e., food). Cavaliers usually LOVE food so it shouldn't be hard.

For instance, when you are out for a walk, and you see someone walking down the street, far away. Teach the dog to pay attention to you when you say his name, and give him a treat whenever he stops paying attention to the person/strange thing and looks at you instead. Praise excessively. Be extra aware of your surroundings. Ideally, you want to notice the strange thing BEFORE the dog does, so that you can start getting his attention before he becomes too focused on barking.

Start with bringing him on walks in deserted streets/areas first, instead of busy streets. That way, there are not so many strange things you have to keep a look out for.

Same thing for when people come over. Put him in a sit-stay, keep praising/treating. Get the guests to give him treats as well so that he associates strange people with good things (treats). Basically, you want to reinforce good behaviour (whenever he pays attention to YOU instead of a strange thing, give a treat), and get him to stop focusing on whatever is triggering his barking. Calling his name and redirecting his attention to you to get a treat is a great way to get him to stop paying attention to whatever is making him bark.