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View Full Version : how much of a discount for a mismarked pup?



cvk
13th November 2011, 02:30 PM
A breeder that I am working with to aquire a pet cav has a mismarked blenham pup. The tan patch continues down from the eye onto most of the lip on one side. She said she would discount this pup. How much of a discount can you expect for a mismark?

Karlin
13th November 2011, 05:20 PM
Hmmmm. For a pet puppy, honestly I really wouldn't expect a discount -- this certainly isn't standard, so I don't think anyone can tell you what the discount should be (especially for a mismark so very minor -- mismarkings are one of the reasons puppies go to pet homes to start with, so just sounds a bit... odd. But on the other hand -- assuming this is a health focused, reputable breeder, it is kind that they are offering a slight price reduction!).

The important thing is really: have you seen the cardiologist certs on the parents for the puppy? The MI scan certs? Has the breeder discussed the heath issues in the breed and her breeding programme, eg how she chose the sire and dam, any scan/heart results on grandparents or other closely related dogs? If the breeder isn't cardiologist (not vet) heart testing, and MRI testing for SM, and knows nothing about the heart and SM status of her breeding dogs, no discount would be large enough on the puppy.

Davecav
13th November 2011, 09:46 PM
Actually a mismarking on pet puppy can be really nice and makes them that bit special - and can look really attractive, it marks them out as a bit different, and as Karlin says a marking is such a superficial little thing - it doesn't affect health! It's only if you wanted to show your puppy that he or she could be penelized in the show ring.
I don't think it's normally done to discount a mismarked puppy, but maybe the breeder is doing it as a bit of goodwill. I wouldn't expect or demand much of one though, as the puppies health and that of his parents is what should be paramount.

Karen and Ruby
13th November 2011, 10:03 PM
Hi there,

i second what Karlin has said. Its not a usual thing to discount a pup going to a pet home so I would be asking why she was offering a discount and being the pesimist that I am I would also wonder whether she was trying to get rid of it for a different reason?

ByFloSin
13th November 2011, 10:35 PM
Hi there,

i second what Karlin has said. Its not a usual thing to discount a pup going to a pet home so I would be asking why she was offering a discount and being the pesimist that I am I would also wonder whether she was trying to get rid of it for a different reason?

With my lawyer's hat on I would agree with what Karen says here. There is also the queston of dealing with an insurance company if you insure, the puppy has health problems and you need to make a claim, because it is likely that the insurers would refuse to pay out if the price of the pup had been reduced.

MadPip
13th November 2011, 11:12 PM
The only discounted puppy I had was Pippin, and that was because of his overbite (which doesn't bother him at all). I'd never heard of a puppy price being reduced for a mismark............... I'd tend to be listening very carefully to what Karlin, Karen and Flo have said.

lscott
14th November 2011, 05:01 AM
Well I guess I just learned something. My Cambridge has the same "mismarking" you are speaking of. I never considered it a flaw, but I never considered showing or breeeding. Cambridge was a "rescue" and now that I know his markings are flawed I wonder if he also wasn't a "through away". Years ago I got my first lab because of mismarkings ( she was brindle) and the breeders were going to euthinize her. Luckily my niece was able to intercede and brought her home. She was a wonderful dog. I've known breeders to sell these pups cheap without the papers and an agreement to have them sterilized. I agree with everyone about checking the heath of the puppy before you decide.

JessieAndMe
14th November 2011, 06:00 AM
I love Cavaliers with unusual markings, it just makes them that little bit sweeter http://www.kolobok.us/smiles/he_and_she/give_heart.gif
If he is she is going to be a pet, I don't understand why that really matters. I'm by no means an expert, just a pet owner myself.
The dogs health and temperament are by far more important, rather than saving a few bucks. If you ask for a discount,
and really want this little poppet, you run the risk of the breeder telling you to shove off.

Soushiruiuma
14th November 2011, 06:17 AM
My instinct is to distrust the breeder. Mismarkings are not a reason to discount a pup, although it is a reason to consider a pet home (or agility/obedience/therapy... home). My suspicion is that the breeder isn't very experienced, or well-versed in these matters. Lots of breeders will claim XX YEARS OF EXPERIENCE BREEDING, which can be very meaningful, but often means little more than "I don't spay and neuter, and these puppies keep happening, so I must be doing something right".

Dedication to the breed, acknowledging health problems, and taking precautions to give the puppies the best chance in life is what matters.

If this breeder is doing all of the health tests important for this breed (beware of forgeries, and make sure you see the certificates, don't take anyone's word for it), then it's possible it's a quirk of the breeder. But I suspect there's something else afoot.

sins
14th November 2011, 11:24 AM
The mismarking you describe is a minor cosmetic issue and wouldn't usually merit a price reduction below what a breeder would normally charge for a pet puppy.
However,I notice from your previous posts that you've looked at a 20 week old puppy.
If this mismarked puppy is 20 weeks old,I wouldn't be surprised if the breeder would consider a reduction to allow it to a good home.Sometimes small breeders are limited for space and especially if another litter is due,they may be anxious to rehome the older puppy.
However,I would find the breeder's sales pitch offputting.
By suggesting to a buyer that a puppy is "discounted",it may give the impression that there is something amiss with the puppy or that you're getting something substandard.It may be the case that there's a problem with the puppy,or it may just be just poor sales technique.
When buying any puppy,make sure you like it and you think it an attractive pet.
If you have an issue with any cosmetic point on a puppy,remember 12 years is a long time to have to look at this dog on your sofa.Buy because you really like the puppy,not because he's discounted.
Finally,a good breeder is worth their weight in gold.
This means being there to support you if something goes wrong healthwise with your puppy or just sharing an interest in the development and wellbeing of a puppy as it grows and matures.A good breeder will have carried out health testing on the parents,heart and eyes,if you're in the USA,often hip and patella.Many breeders now choose to mri scan their breeding stock to check for a neurological condition called syringomyelia.
Breeders who do not health test, do not have the wellbeing of the breed or indeed the interests of the buyer at heart. Avoid these people like the plague.
Where are you located? There are many here who can give you an indication of the expected price for a puppy in your area.
Sins

Karlin
14th November 2011, 12:32 PM
Others made the very good point that actually the mismarked dogs can be the most special as they are that bit different! I really like cavaliers with half a mask, for example -- very cute and different and rare! I have what is called a heavily blanketed tricolour -- she is nearly black on her body, with only a white ruff around her neck and a white spot on her behind. Those would be very undesireable markings in a show dog (though would not necessarily mean a dog couldn't be shown if other far more important elements were very good! Coat patterns are about the least important element :) ).


If this mismarked puppy is 20 weeks old,I wouldn't be surprised if the breeder would consider a reduction to allow it to a good home.Sometimes small breeders are limited for space and especially if another litter is due,they may be anxious to rehome the older puppy.
However,I would find the breeder's sales pitch offputting.

Good point, and good point. :) I think talking about 'discounts' has made this puppy sound as if it's a bit of a problem.... It just kind of ends up sounding like a backyard breeder so I guess that is what triggers some of the concern shown here. But of course we're just getting a summary of what she has said and all may be very honest and straighforward and generous. :D

Sins is right though; don't take any puppy that you will not be happy with for the next decade+. :thmbsup: For some a cosmetic issue is a problem; for others, it isn't.