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lovesmycavs
22nd August 2012, 08:03 AM
i, i have 2 cavs, a boy of 6 months and a girl of 4 months, the boy is as good as gold and been really easy to train, the girl is not so easy. I need advice on how to stop her weeing when she gets excited because she rolls on to her back for tummy tickles and ends up weeing and she constantly smells, if we ignore her she will still stand there and wee, and ends up rolling in it, im constantly having to bath her and wash bedding, i am desperate for some advice please

MomObvious
22nd August 2012, 02:21 PM
Is she crate trained? Its never too late to crate train a dog tho. My parents have a dog that does this when she get excited. A dog natural instinct is not to mess their den or crate. They solved this problem by leaving Addie (the pee pee dog) in the crate until she was calm when they returned from being out. Also when they let her out they give her a treat and then directly outside.
I do not know if this will help you. I would think that would be a very hard thing to try and stop. Perhaps she will out grow it when she physically has better bladder control????? Not sure.
I would also try a "dry" spray on shampoo, bathing her so much can cause other issues like dry itchy skin. Oh and I would ask the vet too just in case there is a medical reason for this.
Good Luck!

Karlin
22nd August 2012, 08:05 PM
Hi: this isn't actually a housetraining problem at all -- it is either a health issue (has your vet checked her for a urinary tract infection? If she is peeing on bedding in particular, this may well be the problem and needs urgent attention or can become a more serious kidney infection) OR it is submission/appeasement urination. Or both. Some timid dogs have this (latter) issue. Most puppies grow out of it but some will continue to pee. Be sure to never ever punish the dog or you will make the problem worse. Here's a good information sheet on the issue.

http://www.bestfriends.org/theanimals/pdfs/dogs/submissiveurination.pdf

Also I'd recommend downloading the free book After You Get Your Puppy here, especially as you have two pups -- two at the same time need a lot of work and can be especially challenging (and need a lot of separate time with you :) )and the book will really help you get them to grow into the adults you want.

www.dogstardaily.com/free-downloads

Also you may really need to start to manage them separately as the male approaches 6 months -- he and the female can potentially have puppies as early as 4-5 months and you will want to get your male neutered around now or keep them separate as the female could potentially go into heat anytime from now on (especially if you aren't familiar with the signs of a female going into heat -- though this can be very hard to spot in some dogs even for experienced dog owners!). :) A lot of people get two pups of different sexes and forget how quickly they can become sexually mature!

sunshinekisses
22nd August 2012, 09:35 PM
My boston terrier was a submissive pee-er. :P It took her months and months before she stopped piddling anytime someone gave her attention. We ignored her peeing and calmed down our greetings to her which helped. She spent alot of time in our kitchen but eventually she outgrew it. She was given the name miss peepee because of her problem but we loved her anyway. Try not to make a big deal over it because it will just make your pup pee more.

I would also have her checked for an UTI at the vet just to make sure.

DZee
22nd August 2012, 11:25 PM
As Karlin states..wouldn't hurt to make sure she is alright physically...first.

Gotta be honest though...we had a little Cocker Spaniel years ago that did the same thing. Would roll over & pee in it's own face almost...lol !! There was nothing wrong physically..as the Vet checked it time and again...but when excited..
>>> piddle.

Our daughter & son-in-law have an English Bull Dog..>> same thing.
She has been fixed for a few months now..but is still fairly young ( only 8 1/2 mo.).
There is nothing wrong w/ her bladder or kidneys ( as she has been all checked out)....but the minute anyone comes over & walks thru the door..her little rear end twists back & forth and she piddles the entire time.
Vet says it is just over-excitement. She has "always" done this.

Said people just need to ignore her for a few minutes when coming in rather than get all lovey - dovey at first.
Since your Cav is still basically a pup...perhaps she will out grow this tendency once she reaches adulthood & is spade. I wish you luck.

Soushiruiuma
22nd August 2012, 11:34 PM
My female is almost 2 and still submissive pees anytime she meets someone new (human or animal). I have her do introductions outside, which has been a really easy workaround.

Karlin
23rd August 2012, 12:01 AM
I have her do introductions outside, which has been a really easy workaround.

This is such a good reminder that so many potential problems also can be resolved or limited with a little creative, positive management. :) Sometimes there isn't any easy answer and in this case, there is certainly no quick fix or sure end result. As the handout I linked to notes, this issue requires gentleness and patience and during that time, a good management solution like this will help. :)

Furrfoot
23rd August 2012, 04:13 AM
We had a boxer who did this too- our solution was also letting her "greet" outside for people she was really excited to see. There can be a humorous side to it sometimes...she was out front with us, and a very athletic couple who walk/jog our neighborhood daily were out there, but Mattie hadn't "met" them yet. She went bounding off the porch, running straight for them. They froze, of course (60 lbs of boxer making a bee-line for you), and we're yelling "SHE'S SWEET, SHE'S FINE- BUT WATCH YOUR SHOES!!!" as we ran out to get her. They yelled "WATCH WHAT???" "YOUR SHOES! YOUR SHOES!!" and sure enough, Mattie is running and "sitting" in front of them, up down up down, trying to say "Hihihihihi!!!" and peeing everywhere every time she sat *facepalm* The joggers started dancing trying to get away from her butt, but still pet her head...Thankfully, we were all laughing by the time we got to them! Poor Mattie, she had watched them go by for months from either the window or the backyard, and she was excited beyond belief to actually get to greet them, lol.

lovesmycavs
23rd August 2012, 07:59 AM
thankyou for all your advice, yes she is crate trained, she did have an infection, which the vet picked up on and has had antibiotics for this, but will get her checked again incase infection is back,. I am planning on getting my boy done, but still decideing wether to let her have 1 litter first, but this wont be for a while yet, so will watch carefully for the signs and seperate.

waldor
23rd August 2012, 03:08 PM
Our Sophie is almost four years old and still does the submissive/excitement peeing. If I know company is coming over, I take her out for a potty, within the hour before they arrive.

DZee
23rd August 2012, 04:52 PM
We had a boxer who did this too- our solution was also letting her "greet" outside for people she was really excited to see. There can be a humorous side to it sometimes...she was out front with us, and a very athletic couple who walk/jog our neighborhood daily were out there, but Mattie hadn't "met" them yet. She went bounding off the porch, running straight for them. They froze, of course (60 lbs of boxer making a bee-line for you), and we're yelling "SHE'S SWEET, SHE'S FINE- BUT WATCH YOUR SHOES!!!" as we ran out to get her. They yelled "WATCH WHAT???" "YOUR SHOES! YOUR SHOES!!" and sure enough, Mattie is running and "sitting" in front of them, up down up down, trying to say "Hihihihihi!!!" and peeing everywhere every time she sat *facepalm* The joggers started dancing trying to get away from her butt, but still pet her head...Thankfully, we were all laughing by the time we got to them! Poor Mattie, she had watched them go by for months from either the window or the backyard, and she was excited beyond belief to actually get to greet them, lol.

ROFLOL....:lol: thanks for the laugh this morning !!! cl*p...luv it !!

Karlin
23rd August 2012, 05:52 PM
thankyou for all your advice, yes she is crate trained, she did have an infection, which the vet picked up on and has had antibiotics for this, but will get her checked again incase infection is back,. I am planning on getting my boy done, but still decideing wether to let her have 1 litter first, but this wont be for a while yet, so will watch carefully for the signs and seperate.


Oh please -- do not even think of breeding her unless you have properly and responsibly learned about the serious health issues that MUST be tested for first. We have lots of information here. This breed is teetering on the edge of survival in its current form, due to two very serious and endemic health problems -- MVD and the neurological disease syringomyelia. Indifferent breeding done without testing is what is leading to the demise of the breed and should not be tolerated by anyone who truly cares about cavaliers. MVD affects almost 100% of cavaliers eventually and takes an average of about four years off the breed lifespan. SM affects at least 70% of adults eventually and is one of the most painful diseases know, ONLY be properly testing and following breeding protocols can you help the breed and hope to at least limit the like.lihood of passsing on these painful killer diseases to any offspring. Untested dogs have about a 80% rate of passing on SM because they generally have it and haven't been tested (we have research results posted elsewhere that explain this). Eeven breeding two clear dogs runs the risk of 25% of offspring having SM. :( MRIs to test for this cost a few hundred pounds for UK breeders, and close to $1000 in the US or more. Also, no cavalier should be bred until AGE FIVE unless you know the SM and MVD test results of the parents of BOTH breeding dogs who must have been heart clear still at age 5 themselves. If you know the heart and MRI results of ALL FOUR GRANDPARENTS and they are heart clear at 5 and an A grade (with few exceptions) on MRI, then you can consider breeding your female but ONLY after age TWO AND A HALF minimum, also only if she tests clear on the curly coat/dry eye DNA test or the sure tests clear, and also tests clear for eyes and patellas and has a good hip score. So you will need to wait over two years to bgreed any cavalier and then only iif you have the clear test results of all four parents of sire and dam; otherwise you must wait til she is at least age 5 and still MVD and SM clear (only about 50% of dogs may be clear of one or the other disease by that age, sadly; eg half of dogs will already have one or the other or both diseases by age 5).

Please, please do not risk inflicting any more suffering on the breed and all the puppies, without doing all these things. If you are interested in breeding, please take the time to really learn about the breed and then who test and work with other responsible, testing breeders. (also be aware that pregnancy is a significant health risk to any female -- a far higher death risk than cancer in the breed, for example. There really must be excellent and important reasons to risk your own dog through pregnancy to even begin to consider breeding as so many things can go wrong for her or the puppies or both).

Please also read the posts in our SM/MVD forum so you understand how hideous and costly these diseases are for owners (who may well pursue you legally for affected puppies expecting some contribution towards expensive MRIs and lifelong medications or brain surgery if you did not test at all) and why it is so important to breed ethically or not at all; and also please read the posts on breeding in the Library section. No dog should ever be bred without proper health clearances (a vet CANNOT give these for this breed; they need specialist tests that are costly) and only if there is some good reason to preserve excellent qualities. Just having a nice friendly dog or wanting puppies is never a good reason to breed.

We also do not allow personal breeding discussions here -- so feel free to ask more about the crisis this breed is in and the relationship to responsible breeding, but not personal decisions, please. :thmbsup: You can read more about why we have this policy in the Getting Started section of the board.

Most of us will eventually be dealing with MVD or SM or both (for example, I have had 5 cavaliers, three with SM and two with MVD (the rest will likely end up with MVD over time). If you weren't aware of these conditions, it is important for every cavalier owner to know about and understand them. :thmbsup:

You can learn more at www.cavalierhealth.org, www.smcavaliers.com, www.cavaliermatters.org and www.cavaliercampaign.com