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emmaK11
16th November 2012, 05:57 PM
so i dont know whether anyone else feels this way, but the pet food market is insanely confusing! i have never been satisfied 100% with any food that im feeding Emma. and there are so many controversial topics, like wet food versus dry, grain free versus grains, homecooked and raw!!! ive read countless articles on each of the benefits and i still find myself having a hard time finding something that im happy with. Emma seems to eat anything at this point (she used to be picky). right now i give her wellness small breed heathy weight and taste of the wild southwest canyon. HELP!! i dont know what to do, i feel like wellness has more vitamins and minerals, but i like that taste of the wild has different protein sources and usually higher protein. or is wet food better? i dont know, if any one can give me specific foods (kibble or wet) that they use and really love !!!!!??
Thanks
Emmas mom

emmaK11
16th November 2012, 05:58 PM
oh and by the way, i just started adding fish oil (salmon) to her food

cpell009
16th November 2012, 07:25 PM
Oh, the endless debate with no real "right" answers... :yikes

In my opinion, based on research and advice from various sources, I think a high-quality dry kibble supplemented with fresh fruits and vegetables is the best way to go. Dry kibble is better than wet since wet is mostly made of water. Dry kibble also is better for the teeth since it helps to clean as they eat.

As for Grain-free or not, I still have no clue! I think as long as they are "healthy" grains (i.e. brown rice, barley, potates), and are not an extremely prominent ingredient on the list, then it should be fine.

Having said that though, I just switched my girls to Orijen which is a grain-free formula. I rotate days between the 6 Fish and Chicken Adult. I decided to go with orijen since, in my area, it is the highest quality food that is available. It is made in Canada with human grade meats and although it is also the most expensive available, I really do think it is the best on the market. I used to feed Fromm four star but their forumla has TINY pieces, which are basically swallowed and not chewed therefore have no teeth cleaning benefits and they eat it quicker. If you feed grain-free though you will have to cut down a bit on the quantity.

I used to supplement with salmon oil as well, but now that I'm feeding the orijen 6 fish I think theyre getting enough.

Both Wellness & Taste of the Wild are quality brands though, but I have to ask why are you feeding the "healthy weight" formula? Is she overweight? Generally healthy-weight versions just have more carbs. Personally when my dog needed to lose weight I just cut down on the quantity and increase the exercise.

Good luck, let us know what you end up going with :)

emmaK11
16th November 2012, 08:00 PM
well yes actually, she just lost 2 pounds! she weighs 15.9 pounds and is very small framed haha. im trying to keep her lean because she has CM so its better for her to not be carrying extra weight. also im trying to keep her lean to keep her heart healthy. before i had her on a "diet", i was only feeding her a total of 1/2 cup a day, 1/4 cup each meal. i felt bad for her cause she was constantly starving and licking her bowl. the wellness healthy weight also has 29% protein which is pretty high for a weight managment food so i liked that aspect of it. shes pretty active and high energy, so it confuses me that she eats so little and still isnt as thin as i would expect. she hardly ever gets any treats. :/

Karlin
16th November 2012, 08:03 PM
Lots of opinions, lots of approaches. :) I've got a lot of links around this issue in the Library section, I think in the Caring for your Cavalier or maybe in the Health section...

Just a quick note -- it is a bit misleading to believe wet food is mostly just water and therefore dry food is better or better value. Kibble is mostly just the ingredients that allow it to hold its shape and be extruded -- not anything of much nutritional value. With kibble, most nutritional value has to be supplemented back in as it gets lost from the 'real' ingredients that are used. Wet food is mostly moisture simply because it is real food (just like we humans are mostly water... :) ) and hasn't been baked or dried.. But wet dog food varies enormously in quality as does dry.

The main thing to keep in mind is that if you choose to only feed a wet food, a dog needs something to also help clean and exercise teeth and jaws -- healthy chews, raw bones for those who feel comfortable giving raw bones (never cooked!) etc.

Karlin
16th November 2012, 08:10 PM
PS I would make sure she is at a healthy weight with your vet -- you don;t want her to be underweight.

Cavaliers like a lot of dogs will always appear hungry but it doesn't mean they are starving. :thmbsup: One key reason so many get so fat is people think they are starving and give them lots of treats or overfeed! from experience I can tell you a cavalier with access to a large bag of food will eat happily eat itself sick! So people should never give 'what the dog wants' or free-feed, but carefully controlled portions. :D

RodRussell
16th November 2012, 09:36 PM
...Dry kibble is better than wet since wet is mostly made of water. ...

I could not agree less with that comment. One of the reasons that canned (wet) food is better is because it has moisture in it. Dry food is the junk food of the pet food industry. It is overloaded with carbohydrates like corn or wheat or other grains, simply to enable it to bind together better in the bag, and certainly not because such carbs are good for the dogs.

Dogs, like humans, need a lot of moisture in their foods -- like 70% -- and don't assume that when a dog eats dry food it will have enough sense to switch back and forth between the food bowl and the water bowl.

cpell009
16th November 2012, 09:46 PM
Dry food is the junk food of the pet food industry. It is overloaded with carbohydrates like corn or wheat or other grains, simply to enable it to bind together better in the bag, and certainly not because such carbs are good for the dogs

I dont necessarily believe that to be true. Like human food, for dogs there are high quality foods and low quality ones. No high end dry kibble has any corn or wheat, and in fact many are available grain-free made with human grade meats.

The main reason I am personally against wet food is due to its effect on the teeth. But like Karlin said, if you are sure to give lots of bones and brush frequently, then a high quality wet food would be fine. My dogs drink plenty of water on their own, I dont think either has any dehydration issues. Plus I feed fruits and veggies which have high moisture content.

RodRussell
17th November 2012, 12:36 AM
I dont necessarily believe that to be true. Like human food, for dogs there are high quality foods and low quality ones. No high end dry kibble has any corn or wheat, and in fact many are available grain-free made with human grade meats.

Please name a few "high end" kibbles.


The main reason I am personally against wet food is due to its effect on the teeth. ...

What negative effect do you believe "wet" food has on teeth?

Super Princess
17th November 2012, 01:47 AM
i havn't acutally read the entire thread..just skimmed a few posts.
However..for my cats ..my vet has said that the wet food is better because it is less processed. (obviously still procssed) but...the body has to work less to break it down..and as a result the wet food has been mor damaging to the kidneys.

i found this out..when our maxie got sick with kidney failure..and i tried absolutly everything to get food into him..i caved and bought the wet food..which had just been a very rare treat. maxie never made it..we lost him to the kidney failure. but meeko..wet food has become an INSISTANT..infact he has pretty much stopped eating dry al together (could be due to his teeth..at 16 theyre not in great shape)
anyways.. wet food is now a staple in our house.


however..when maggie comes home.. the breeder has them on Acana puppy food..and doing my research have been told that this is pretty high quality stuff. i will probably keep her on it for a while..and then do the math and see if its cheaper to put her on stuff we get at the vet..as the pet insurance im going to go with will pay for half the vet food.

emmaK11
17th November 2012, 03:38 AM
so i think maybe it would be healthy to do half wet half kibble? maybe ill try that, im very strict with how much food i give her and i make sure that everyone else in the house is as well because i know how important her health is, but i would never allow her to become underweight. The vet said she looks healthy at 15.9 pounds and that she wouldnt want to see her gain any more.

that being said, which canned food do u guys like? ive tried some but not many. there are TONS out there though. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

emmaK11
17th November 2012, 04:08 AM
so i think maybe it would be healthy to do half wet half kibble? maybe ill try that, im very strict with how much food i give her and i make sure that everyone else in the house is as well because i know how important her health is, but i would never allow her to become underweight. The vet said she looks healthy at 15.9 pounds and that she wouldnt want to see her gain any more.

that being said, which canned food do u guys like? ive tried some but not many. there are TONS out there though. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

MomObvious
17th November 2012, 05:10 AM
Personally I would feed raw or home cooked meals IF I had more knowledge/time or an expert in animal nutrition help me meal plan. But I do what I believe is the next best thing. Fletcher is on Wellness Core with raw fresh fruits and veggies thrown in. He only gets fruits and veggies as treats or kibble. I personally do not feed wet food because tho there are good ones out there I just am rather grossed out by many can foods, even human ones. Fletcher gets lots of home made frozen treats too. I freeze blocks of ice with fruit and veggies in them, he loves them will lick and lick away at the ice and they are a good "keep him busy" and I even leave him in his crate with one when I'm going to be out for a longer time.

If you are already feeding Wellness then try the Core canned food.

emmaK11
17th November 2012, 04:31 PM
what kinds of vegetables? and do u cook them or leave them raw?

RodRussell
17th November 2012, 04:56 PM
what kinds of vegetables? and do u cook them or leave them raw?

We feed our dogs and cat primarily raw food, including beef, turkey, chicken organs, and ground mixed vegetables which we buy frozen. The vegetables are the usual assortments of mixed frozen vegetables. Our recipes are approved by our main holistic veterinarian and include supplements designed for cardiac health.

MomObvious
18th November 2012, 03:04 AM
what kinds of vegetables? and do u cook them or leave them raw?


Raw and some frozen. Fletcher gets a lot of baby carrots cause we always have them in the house, but frozen green beans, beets (I do peel and chop them) sometimes he gets sweet potatoes and frozen peas. Fruit he loves strawberries, apples, blueberries I almost always have all 3 in the house too. But he really likes melons too, honeydew I make in big chunks and froze them these were great treats for those hot summer days.

Now that I think about it the only canned food Fletcher has every had was canned pumpkin, it really helps with those bouts of "puppy yucky poops"


I was wondering tho would it be a nice Thanksgiving treat to let Fletcher have the turkey giblets? You know the organs.... cooked or raw???? Would that be alright? And if so could I skip the kibble that night?

emmaK11
18th November 2012, 05:35 PM
i just bought a bag of frozen vegetables at whole foods, if i mix them in with emma's food i think shell eat them, but i've tried giving her small pieces of carrots and shell take them and then leave them on the carpet. i'm not sure about the turkey giblets, i bought emma the merrick thanksgiving day canned food for thanksgiving. they come in really small cans now for small breed so that u dont have to leave a big can opened in the fridge for too long. its perfect

RodRussell
18th November 2012, 06:09 PM
i just bought a bag of frozen vegetables at whole foods, if i mix them in with emma's food i think shell eat them, but i've tried giving her small pieces of carrots and shell take them and then leave them on the carpet. i'm not sure about the turkey giblets, i bought emma the merrick thanksgiving day canned food for thanksgiving. they come in really small cans now for small breed so that u dont have to leave a big can opened in the fridge for too long. its perfect

We've found that frozen vegetables are best consumed and digested by our cavaliers if they are ground. Merrick Thanksgiving Day Dinner is one of our two favorites for when we travel or run out of our pre-prepared raw meals. The ingredients lists of that Merrick canned food, as well as Merrick Cowboy Cookout, are impressive.

cpell009
19th November 2012, 03:37 PM
Please name a few "high end" kibbles.

Orijen, Acana, Fromm Four Star, Wellness

I feed Orijen (rotating with 6 Fish and Adult Chicken) supplemented with fruits and vegetables. If you are advocating Merrick, then you should take a look at Orijen's ingredients. Unfortunately I do not have the time, space, or money to feed a raw diet, so with that said I do believe feeding Orijen (with fruits and veg) meets all of their nutritional needs and is made with quality ingredients.

Many many sources have said that wet food can cause tooth decay if proper dental hygiene is not ensured. This includes two of my vets and several books I have read.

emmaK11
21st November 2012, 11:18 PM
i brush emmas teeth twice a day, and feed her half kibble half wet so i dont think tooth decay should be a problem. i hope not at least.

Brian M
22nd November 2012, 12:44 PM
Hi
Dont feed too many carrots as they have a high sugar content , i am giving more
brocolli and cabbage and turnip in place of them though I still feed some.

Emkaybee
22nd November 2012, 06:43 PM
Emma!11,

You have my sympathies in your efforts to feed your pup! :). As you can see from just the posts on your thread, this is one of the more passionately debated topics in dog-dom! The best advice I've gotten is to find a quality food your dog will eat and your checkbook will support, and just feed it without losing sleep over it. Truthfully there are so many more quality dog foods nowadays than 20 or so years ago--it's wonderful but also confusing. But it also means if you do your research (which is what you're doing), in the long run you are giving your dog an excellent chance at a long and healthy life. Good luck!

Bentley02
25th December 2012, 12:23 AM
Dry food is not the "junk food" of dog foods, SOME are, but the foods mentioned on here such as wellness, are high quality, healthy foods. Yes, dry dog foods sold at the grocery store are junk food and have nothing good in them, but there are many many healthy dry dog foods available at pet stores.
It sounds to me like you are on the right track with feeding the right thing. Grain-free is great for dogs (like mine) that show an intolerance for grains, but if your dog(s) seems to be fine with them, they are healthy as long as you choose foods with higher quality grains (no corn or wheat especially); potatoes, oatmeal, barley etc. are perfectly healthy grains.
I would also be careful with the "vet" foods out there. Vets tend to recommend and sell whatever brand sponsors them, and it's not always as good as they make it out to be. READ the ingredients. We were not impressed with the "vet quality" brand our vet sells. You don't want to see the words "corn" or "by product" for example.

RodRussell
25th December 2012, 02:03 PM
Dry food is not the "junk food" of dog foods, SOME are, but the foods mentioned on here such as wellness, are high quality, healthy foods. Yes, dry dog foods sold at the grocery store are junk food and have nothing good in them, but there are many many healthy dry dog foods available at pet stores.

I called dry food "junk food" earlier in this thread. Even the best dry food is the worst form of food for dogs. By its nature -- it is "dry" -- dry food is unnatural and unintended for dogs to have to digest. Most dry dog foods are cooked twice and dehydrated. This extreme processing removes nearly all of the natural moisture of the ingredients, and the food becomes far too dry to be healthful for the dog. The lack of natural moisture in dry food requires the dog’s body to provide sufficient moisture to reconstitute the food in the digestive tract. This unnaturally stresses the kidneys, liver, and metabolic system. This extreme processing also changes the structure of proteins and destroys vitamin A, vitamin E and the B-group vitamins.

The list of ingredients of dry foods can be very deceptive. Ingredients are listed in the order of their weight before they are processed. If a particular type of meat appears at the top of the ingredient list of a dry food, that is because meat in its pre-processed form is about 70% water and therefore is heavy. But once the meat is cooked twice and dehydrated, then it becomes much lighter in weight than the second, third, fourth, and even fifth ingredients, but the meat remains at the top of the ingredient list because the list was compiled before the ingredients were dehydrated.

Also, most dry foods made with animal protein contains rendered meat by-products, which are more difficult for pets to digest than human grade meat. Poultry by-products can include beaks, feet, feathers, wattles, combs, and unclean intestinal tracts.

Karlin
25th December 2012, 11:35 PM
Personally I do not think kibble makes a whole heck of a lot of difference as to whether a dog gets tooth decay. Regardless of (healthy) diet, I have some cavaliers (ONE!) with really good teeth, one with moderately OK teeth, and three that get gum and tooth problems, regardless of being given at times, kibble, raw bones, good chews, commercial wet, or raw diets.

Nothing but wet food without any chews, raw bones and/or regular home dental care is going to be a poor choice for teeth, however. But kibble as an effective teeth cleaner? Many dogs barely chew it or not at all -- most don't spend much time chewing it so most of the time, it isn't doing a whole lot of scraping that I can see.

Any kibble is going to a be a poorer choice than fresh or quality prepared (tinned or raw) food. Kibble is a processed food, no matter how many nice ingredients, how expensive, how well marketed, how 'holistic'. Most of the vitamins and minerals have to be added back in as supplements as they are processed out (exactly like every processed food we buy -- breakfast cereal being a very similar example).

Not one doctor or nutritionist will tell you to go buy processed foods for your home dinner table. But they will tell you quality tinned and frozen foods are the equal of fresh and sometimes better if the 'fresh' food has actually been on the shelf for a while and is days from when it was harvested (tinned and frozen are packaged very soon after picking). There's also now outstanding evidence that gut flora are critical to our health and a limited diet (ie processed food; a narrow range of fresh) means a far narrower range of gut flora, eliminating some that are very likely key to good health (we now know gut flora may actually activate genes, offer protection against or contribute to disease, all depending on the person, genes and gut environment AND, critically, whether a human, dog, cat or whatever is overweight -- which changes the gut environment and seems to trigger many unwanted conditions and diseases.

Vegetables & fruit are the least critical part of a dog's diet -- they only need a modest amount of these and get little direct nutrition from them. Definitely give them moderate amounts of fresh fruit and veg -- but I think it is a lot more important for dogs and cats to get good quality fresh/homecooked/prepared raw MEAT or a quality tinned meat diet. Supplement with kibble if wanted (I use kibble for travelling or to add to the occasional meal but I hardly buy any kibble any more.

My real turning point on this issue was a sick elderly cat -- she had had diarrhea or very soft, very smelly stools for years. Then she started to lose weight and became very listless -- she had the whole panel of tests, nothing definite found, tried this and that; vet felt she had very bad IBD or maybe a tumour and last ditch option was we'd put her on low dose daily prednisone to see if that gave her back some quality of life.

I decided to try one last thing -- switch Jessie (and therefore all the four cats) from kibble and a daily bit of commercial supermarket tinned food, to a raw diet, including her sister who had begun to go into early stage thyroid disease (a common condition in older cats but only since around the 70s -- the advent of a huge commercial pet food market). Putting Jessie on raw was literally an overnight miracle. The next day she had the first normal stool in years. No horrible stink. She started putting on weight. The vomity-rpone thyroid cat stopped vomiting almost entirely. Jessie started gaining weight again. I brought her into the vet after a month on raw and she'd put on 25% more weight and was nearly back to her normal weight a few years ago. She went from listless to mischievous, playing with toys again instead of sitting facing the wall. My vet was astonished -- and asked for the name of the frozen raw diet she was on (along with a commercial high quality wet food made for dogs -- comes in plastic trays, not tins, has normal meat and veg, not all that weird smelly stuff in much tinned food).

That and attending a European science forum in Dublin in the summer and hearing research on gut flora just totally changed my view on what to feed animals. Gut health is linked to an extraordinary range of illnesses, researchers are finding -- not just those involving the gut itself. Feeding the equivalent of Wheaties to a dog all its life (which is really what any kibble is --a fortified dried processed food) just cannot be very healthy, and I do think dietary choices we make, and overfeeding them so they are overweight or even worse, obese, can predispose them to a vast range of diseases (turns the genetic or environmental switch on, or eliminates the healthful environment for the good gut flora that is protective).

Even feeding, say, a prepared frozen raw diet a couple of times a week instead of kibble has got to be a massive improvement in healthful eating. Feeding raw is hardly more difficult than opening a tin or giving kibble, because it is easy to get prepared raw at pet shops or even mail order. Quality prepared frozen raw foods are balanced; most have raw bone ground in giving natural calcium; it's easy to add desired supplements (eg omega 3 or CoQ12). But opt for a quality tinned food if preferred. Or add fresh meats to a meal -- that's more valuable to diet than fruit/veg.

I do think there are risk elements in feeding fresh raw bones that every person needs to weigh up -- I find the dogs still can eat these in ways that produce bone fragments that could cause risks, while the cats seem to gnaw bones (say, in raw chicken wings) slowly down in a far safer way.

Lani
26th December 2012, 02:29 AM
My real turning point on this issue was a sick elderly cat -- she had had diarrhea or very soft, very smelly stools for years. Then she started to lose weight and became very listless -- she had the whole panel of tests, nothing definite found, tried this and that; vet felt she had very bad IBD or maybe a tumour and last ditch option was we'd put her on low dose daily prednisone to see if that gave her back some quality of life.

I decided to try one last thing -- switch Jessie (and therefore all the four cats) from kibble and a daily bit of commercial supermarket tinned food, to a raw diet, including her sister who had begun to go into early stage thyroid disease (a common condition in older cats but only since around the 70s -- the advent of a huge commercial pet food market). Putting Jessie on raw was literally an overnight miracle. The next day she had the first normal stool in years. No horrible stink. She started putting on weight. The vomity-rpone thyroid cat stopped vomiting almost entirely. Jessie started gaining weight again. I brought her into the vet after a month on raw and she'd put on 25% more weight and was nearly back to her normal weight a few years ago. She went from listless to mischievous, playing with toys again instead of sitting facing the wall. My vet was astonished -- and asked for the name of the frozen raw diet she was on (along with a commercial high quality wet food made for dogs -- comes in plastic trays, not tins, has normal meat and veg, not all that weird smelly stuff in much tinned food).

Wow, Karlin. This is compelling. Thanks for sharing it. My sister and I both had elderly Hyperthyroid cats (I think Hyper not hypo ....??). They did the vomiting and everything and we ended up medicating them for years. I wish we'd known that a diet change like this could make a difference.

Re: dogs, I know first hand what a differnce it makes. My dogs have never done well on commercial kibble - even super premiums, but did great on frozen raw and dehydrated raw (The Honest Kitchen). I personally do the dehydrated because of the convenience factor - the frozen raw can be hard to find and I don't have enough freezer space to stock too much at a time.

Anyway, after several years on various proteins, my guys are now on Zeal, which is the Honest Kitchen's fish base (and priciest) dehydrated raw formula. they are doing amazing on it. I feed them a high quality baked (not extruded) kibble for occassional treats. Lucky is prone to Diarrhea and he has never done better on any food and I've probably tried most of them.

Anyway, this is a really interested thread - I've enjoyed hearing people's varying views on diets.

Karlin
26th December 2012, 05:25 PM
Hi Lani -- I don't know if raw will resolve the thyroid problem -- am sure it is the same you experienced -- but it sure helped settle her stomach. I ned to have her do the blood tests again to see where she is at. It IS known that a very strict diet can normalise thyroid problem cats. Hill's actually has such a diet now -- clinical trials show it works with some cats -- but it seemed to me that trying a raw diet that limited her iodine intake etc might do the same thing and I didn't want her on just the dry. If her bloods don't improve then I will try the Hill's diet. The thyroid issues are a real hassle -- owners are faced with either medication twice daily or irradiating the cat (really!). She is very early stage with few symptoms. But she used to eat then vomit several times a week -- now it is only very occasionally.

With Jessie-- the difference was so amazing that I thought if this is what helps with an ill animal then what am I doing feeding anything else to the healthier gang... I've never tried the dehydrated but hear it is quite good. Nicki uses it I know as she has posted before about it. Very handy for travel too. No one carries it in Ireland as far as I know. unfortunately!

Kim N
27th December 2012, 04:58 AM
Just putting in a quick plug for raw. Oliver eats it and has since I spoke to his breeder, picked him out and told her its what I intended to feed. So since about 8-10weeks old. He's 1 now and is just gorgeous, has absolutely no doggie smell, gorgeous teeth and always looks forward to meal times. I am no expert so feed prepared frozen so I know it's complete. It's ground so he essentially eats wet food and I don't give bones because they make me nervous but his teeth are gorgeous. He does do a lot of chewing on other things though from toys and kongs to antlers.

my neighbours have brought over their puppy for me to watch without her food when they had a family emergency and I had nothing to feed her so she went right on to the raw. When she came her poos were large liquid puddles every time and they are just now for the first time since I have known her getting solid like they should be.

I don't know hard facts but what I do know is the difference I see in dogs that eat raw to dogs that eat kibble.

cpell009
27th December 2012, 04:23 PM
You make some good points, Karlin. I also like Lani's suggestion of deyhdrated raw food. I thought it only came fresh or frozen, and i have practically no freezer space. Even though the girls are doing well on Orijen supplemented with bones and fruits/veg (they have nice teeth, coats and stool consistency), I think I may switch to the honest kitchen once this bag of food runs out and see how that goes. Are there drawbacks to the deyhdrated versions of raw or are they of similar nutritional quality as the fresh/frozen?

Lani
27th December 2012, 05:03 PM
You make some good points, Karlin. I also like Lani's suggestion of deyhdrated raw food. I thought it only came fresh or frozen, and i have practically no freezer space. Even though the girls are doing well on Orijen supplemented with bones and fruits/veg (they have nice teeth, coats and stool consistency), I think I may switch to the honest kitchen once this bag of food runs out and see how that goes. Are there drawbacks to the deyhdrated versions of raw or are they of similar nutritional quality as the fresh/frozen?

I am computer challenged today (long story ...) so please excuse the brief reply and typos.

IMO, dehydrated is much better than kibble but not quite as good as frozen raw because in the US it is heated above 118 degrees fahrenheit so it can kill any bacteria (USDA requirement most likely). That said it is not heated MUCH above that so I think some beneficial enzymes and vitamins are destoryed but nothing like with kibble. It's a compromise that works well for me though as my dogs are doing great on it and it is more workable for my life than fresh or frozen raw (especially since I'm a vegetarian!)

CBS Sunday morning did an article about pet food that people might find interesting. The Honest Kitchen is featured in it:

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-3445_162-57550982/why-gourmet-food-is-going-to-the-dogs/