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View Full Version : Glad and Sad For Cavaliers



cavdaddy008
7th February 2013, 09:27 PM
We are new to this forum and also to Cavaliers. What a delightful breed this is. You can't help but love them. Everyone just has to say hello and pet and snuggle our Jenny, who is almost 1 year now. It's really sad for me to think about all the potential health issues that this breed has. It just doesn't seem right that these nice little dogs carry these big health burdens. We will love and care for Jenny as best we can. We probably would not have gotten her if we had done our research better. As least now we can be better prepared mentally for the future we hope will never happen. Still forewarned is forearmed. We'll try not to be focused on the health issues and just take it one day at a time. Are there others who have similar feelings?

Emkaybee
8th February 2013, 06:05 AM
Yes, I think many here and elsewhere are saddened by their potential problems. If your Jenny is still quite young, you might consider getting health insurance for her. It's cheaper when there are no pre-existing conditions. Its good to have the wherewithal to provide them with any and all healthcare they need.

Badge511
8th February 2013, 04:25 PM
Nope! I couldn't be happier with my cavvie. I read books about the breed and got her without any concern (from an established breeder). I take good care of her (proper food, diet, exercise) and fully follow her vet's instructions. She is an absolute delight and brings nothing but joy to this old guy. I won't consider any other breed - in my mind, they are the best! No regrets, happy, happy, happy. Enjoy your little one!

MomObvious
8th February 2013, 05:34 PM
Yes, I share your feeling about all the hereditary health problems this breed faces. Educate yourself, buy pet medical insurance, and find the balance between worry and enjoy.


I think every person has to decide for themselves if owning a cavalier is worth the risk.

Lynne
8th February 2013, 08:55 PM
I can understand your thoughts but equally you have to weigh up the fact that this breed is beautiful, gentle and heaven sent. Yes, your little love may face things you would rather they didnt, but thats nature. Bad health can happen to all of us. Make sure you have the right insurance to fight whatever the future throws at you, put it in a drawer and then just enjoy every moment of every day you can with your pup. It can go so fast, there isnt time to worry about the 'what ifs'.

cavdaddy008
8th February 2013, 10:24 PM
What we are trying to follow now is:

"Yesterday's history; Tomorrow's a mystery; Today is a gift; That's why it's called the present."

Any recommendations for a good pet insurance company in California? Thanks

cavdaddy008
8th February 2013, 10:29 PM
I can understand your thoughts but equally you have to weigh up the fact that this breed is beautiful, gentle and heaven sent. Yes, your little love may face things you would rather they didnt, but thats nature. Bad health can happen to all of us. Make sure you have the right insurance to fight whatever the future throws at you, put it in a drawer and then just enjoy every moment of every day you can with your pup. It can go so fast, there isnt time to worry about the 'what ifs'.

Very sorry for your recent loss. We had a loss (JackRussell age 15) over a year ago and I'm still not recovered from it. The dog pic in your avatar is very very close to what Jenny looks like. I'll have to get a pic up. Thank you for the kind words.

TomA
8th February 2013, 11:54 PM
We rescued Charlie just over a year ago knowing he had SM. His meds are a little more expensive than we expected, but we have him signed up as a non-insured patient at Costco and get a good price. But, more to the point, he just goes on with his live. He's a happy little boy, and full of life even at 4. He walks weird sometimes, he shadow scratches when he walks, but doesn't let it bother it. He never shows any sign of pain, just discomfort.

It seems to me that if SM is caused to some degree by having too small a skull then breeders could start breeding accordingly and get these beautiful pets beyond this disease in a few generations instead of getting worse as it is now.

TomA

cavdaddy008
9th February 2013, 03:51 AM
Hi Tom. Thanks for taking on a rescue dog. It's nice to hear that Charlie and his family are "working things out." Here's a thread where I asked SM and breeding.

http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/showthread.php?42838-Breeding-Out-MV-and-SM

Kate H
9th February 2013, 07:13 AM
Tom spoke of SM being caused in part 'by having too small a skull'. This isn't strictly true. What seems to happen is that the skull finishes growing and should tell the brain to stop growing as well, but the skull/brain communication doesn't work and the brain goes on growing for a bit, thereby crowding the skull. So breeding for bigger heads isn't going to make much difference, because it's more a matter of too big a brain rather than too small a skull. The foetal tissue project at the Royal Veterinary College is trying to discover what causes the skull/brain communication to break down - it seems to happen very early in life.

My rescue Aled also has SM - he didn't when I got him but as a puppy farm dog the risk was always high. I hate to think what would have happened to him if he had stayed undiagnosed in his kennel, though so far his symptoms are fairly mild, but gradually getting worse. But Cavaliers have such a capacity for enjoying life and making the most of what they can do, and like Charlie, you appreciate every moment with them.

Kate, Oliver and Aled

cavdaddy008
10th February 2013, 04:15 AM
Reading so many post from genuinely caring owners is encouraging me to be more understanding and watchful. Thanks.

We are blessed for all the support we receive from our dog-owner friends.

Lynne
10th February 2013, 01:01 PM
hi there,
The people on this forum were wonderful to me when we went through possibly the worst week I have ever had, in January this year. I was new, and they were supportive, helpful, and gave me encourgement when I really didn't know what to try next. As it happens, what happened to Megan wasn't something that could have been predicted as it wasn't one of the 'usual's. She was strong and happy, her heart was healthy, and not a sign of SM anywhere. In the end it was her liver that let her down (and had been letting her down for all her life by the looks of it - you can read our week long saga on the site). It shows that you cant predict anything, but whatever gets put in your way, there are people here who will help you, no matter what time of day or night you post.
All the best
Lynne xx