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Thread: Worried about Isabelle........

  1. #21
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    Two items. This is from the UK's Dept of Health fact sheet on antibiotic resistence. It advises:

    Q
    If I am prescribed antibiotics, should I stop taking them as soon as I begin to feel better?

    A
    No. Take them as prescribed and finish the course, unless your doctor or pharmacist advises otherwise. Antibiotic resistance is more likely to develop if antibiotics are taken intermittently, for example, just when you remember, or in too low a dose.
    Here's the link to the whole article, which also addresses overprescribing of antibiotics, the other cause of the resistence problem:

    http://www.dh.gov.uk/PolicyAndGuidan...260&chk=hhYgty


    And here's a recent article on the seriousness of this problem for public health:

    EU addresses deadly threat of rising resistance to antibiotics

    By James Kanter International Herald Tribune

    FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 2006



    PARIS In a major challenge to doctors and drug manufacturers, European Union officials will tackle a looming public health crisis on Friday as options for treating for common ailments like pneumonia and bronchitis disappear after decades of overprescribing of antibiotic drugs.

    "We know that there is growing concern among the public about rising rates of antibiotic resistance," said Janez Potocnik, the EU science and research commissioner, who will present the plan.

    The initiative represents a challenge to doctors and pharmacists, who often dispense antibiotics to people with viral illnesses rather than bacterial infections, giving bacteria plentiful opportunities to build up defenses.

    The initiative also could represent a challenge to the makers of generic antibiotics, which have come to dominate the market and could have their sales eroded if the EU campaign takes hold.

    EU officials will use €11.5 million, or $13.9 million, to jump-start a network, dubbed Grace. It will link medical and science faculties in nine countries, which will focus on training for health care workers, monitoring resistance and developing tests to establish patients' suitability for drugs to treat pneumonia and bronchitis.

    A key element of the project, EU officials said, will be to encourage a new crop of companies to develop fast and affordable kits for doctors so they can identify patients who would benefit from drugs, and withhold drugs from those who are unsuited to treatment.

    If successful, the EU aims to promote testing and perform trials on drugs for a wider range of emerging infectious diseases, which could include diseases like avian influenza, or bird flu.

    Leaders of the Grace project said an outbreak of pandemic bird flu would be likely to trigger even heavier consumption of antibiotics.
    Those antibiotics would probably do little to help patients with the virus but would create even more resistant strains of bacteria, in turn making it more difficult to cure patients who have developed bacterial complications as a result of bird flu.

    "A pandemic would be terrible," said Sophia Tickell, a researcher for React, a network of academics and researchers based in Sweden. "Think how much worse it would be if effective new antibiotics were not available for hospitalized patients."

    But there are few signs that new medicines are coming. Adding to the urgency of the EU campaign is the near- empty pipeline of new, resistance-free antibiotic medicines.

    Since the 1970s, drug companies seeking to improve their bottom lines have redirected research and development away from antibiotics, which are used for short-term illnesses like bronchitis and pneumonia, and into far more lucrative drugs to treat chronic disorders like depression and diabetes.

    Other factors also reduce the incentives for new antibiotic breakthroughs: Even if there were new drugs, analysts say, doctors would still prescribe generic copies of older antibiotics first, because they are cheap and plentiful.

    The economics of antibiotics are "making it difficult for new antibiotics to warrant the premium price they need to generate a return on investment," Stewart Adkins of Lehman Brothers in London said.

    So rather than depending on industry to develop new, resistance-free medicines to keep Europeans healthy, the EU authorities now are seeking to reduce overall use of antibiotics to stop the current elevated levels of resistance from rising .

    "We need diagnostics, we need rapid molecular tests that give us results in one or two hours," said Herman Goossens, the leader of the EU project and a professor at the University of Antwerp in Belgium.
    Goossens said it would be important for governments in Europe to reimburse for tests to ensure that diagnostics companies find a market for their products.

    Drug companies spend billions on trials and promotions of new drugs but spend relatively little on developing such tests, knowing that they could reduce overall drug consumption.

    Goossens also favors public campaigns to raise awareness of the problem. In Belgium, prescriptions of some antibiotics have fallen up to 8 percent since 2000, when the Belgian authorities started a televised awareness campaign, according to Goossens.

    React said that in some European countries 50 percent of the tests carried out on bacteria from patients indicated that the antibiotic methicillin had no effect on Staphylococci, the most common infection in hospitals, showing how even people suffering from nonbacterial illnesses can be in grave danger when antibiotic resistance takes hold.

    Clinicians have blamed the spread of hospital "superbugs" for the deaths of as many as 3,000 people each year in Belgium and as many as 15,000 people each year in Britain.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
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  2. #22
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    That's what I meant. But I wrote "resident" instead of resistent.
    Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.
    --Roger Caras

  3. #23
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    Well it made sense boths ways!
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlin
    Well it made sense boths ways!
    I knew was you were saying Rory!
    Kat

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennapea
    You both really reassured me this could be something easily fixed. I feel horrible now at the number of times we yelled "No No" at her and placed her outside. We'll see what happens at the vet. It never occurred to me the last few days she might have an infection. We only noticed yesterday when we met the breeders and she must have tinkled at least 15 times in 2 hours. The breeder mentioned maybe there was a kidney problem. It should have occurred to me there could be a problem when she was only peeing inside and not pooping inside and how often she was doing it. My stomach really hurts. :cry:
    Kat--when i read your first post, i was thinking deja vu, this sounds like what happened with my cat, many years ago. She was maybe 2 years old, and always had been catbox trained, she's an indoor cate. We moved to a new place and there were cats in our backyard. We let one inside. Soon after that, Fluffy started peeing in unfortunate places, i had to throw the bean bag chair away for example. The odor was so strong.

    I was really upset. I believed that after we let the other cat in, Fluffy now felt that she must mark her territory. This went on for some months. she peed on everything. i was really angry at her. Finally, i called a cat psychologist. I was going to have her treated by a behaviorist. I talked to two of them on the phone. One of them said they'd be happy to work with her, but first i was required to take her to a vet, just to make sure there was not a medical cause.

    At the vet, i put Fluffy up on the table and the vet put some kind of catheter or probe into her bladder and made her pee, and out of her, on the silver table, came a puddle of blood.

    icon_oops

    Boy was i stupid. I felt like poo. what an idiot i was . Duh Duh Duh. Fluffy had a bladder infection. My furniture smelled like urine, i had yelled at Fluffy, felt victimized, meanwhile, Fluffy was suffering and i couldn't think beyond my theory.

    Giving Fluffy antibiotics was a nightmare. Apparently the medicine, liquid, tasted very bad, and Fluffy would scream like a banshee and claw and fight like her life was at stake to avoid taking the meds. In the beginning she took them, but once she caught on that we were torturing her, she did her best to refuse. The whole thing was a very bad ordeal made much worse by my ignorance.

    for UTI prevention and treatment i recommend D-mannose. It's a sugar. You can mix it in water and use a syringe to squirt it into their mouth, and it tastes good. There are different brands of it. You can give it during and after menstruation, or any other event that raises the risk of infection. It's effective for prevention.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlin
    ....The problem is that unless the full course is followed, there's a good chance a few bacteria will survive and produce a new strain of offspring that are increasingly more resistent to the antibiotic......
    yes--when you think about it, in the first day or two of the medication, it's going to be the constitutionally weaker less healthy bacteria that are killed first. The stronger ones will last longer. the longer you take the meds, the more you can finally overcome the stronger ones. But if you stop after 3 or 4 days of a 10 day course, what you end up doing is getting rid of the weak members of the colony, and leaving the stronger ones to inbreed so that you create a super species, a robust medication-resistant bunch of germs. Not a good idea.

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