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Thread: Possessional

  1. #11
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    I do have to have a little chuckle because she is so incredibly sweet sleeping with her little toy. And you voice is so incredibly sweet and soothing. But it's not working is it?! Hope you get this figured out. I just adore Cookie...she the prettiest little thing.

    We did teach "can I have it?" and they will both give up whatever they have. Not sure how we did it ... it was a long time ago. But, after giving it up they either get a treat, another toy or I throw the toy they gave me for them to fetch it.
    Cathy
    Loving mom to Jake, Shelby and Micah

  2. #12
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    thank you for the articles, iv not had a chance to read theough them properly as i'v been packing to go away on sunday, but i will definately give them a try.

    What happened was Cookie lived with my best friend until she was two but they didn't have the time for her so gave her to a family friend. She was at their house until she was four and the family split up, the father was becoming mentally unstable. Something must have gone on in that house as when we got cookie last october she kept on cowering like she had been hit, she gets stressed out with shouting or things being thrown near her, she didnt know how to play, v.unsociable, and the worst was probably the possessional issue.

    We had to get rid of her old bed because she wudnt let you within a metre of it. We had alot of trouble feeding her at first because when you would enter the room her bowl was in she would run past you growl and cower over it and bark! I'v got a video i'll post where shes doing that back in december. It breaks my heart though when she's like this because she has come such a long way since we got her ten months ago (she actually plays and WANTS to cuddle, whereas before if you cuddled her she'd run off into another room) but when shes guarding something cookie totally switches off and you can see after a while she hates being in that state of mind and feels really bad about it.

    I'll definately read through the articles in the morning as its midnight now, and i'll let you know how she's getting on. I'm training to be a therapist so know about conditioning which'l help. Thank you all for your help tho i really appreciate it. Apart from the possession aggression cookie is such a wonderful dog and very playful now (as I'm typing shes on the sofa behind me on her back with her nose on my shoulder snoring haha)

  3. #13
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    Riley was very protective of some of her special toys and would growl at us if she thought we were going to take them from her. She's also very protective of her stinky socks!!!

    We taught her "let it go" by exchanging the object for a treat. She still is a little protective at times, but she will freely give up whatever she is protecting if we tell her to, so we continue to work on it and she gets better all the time!
    Heather, Fletcher (Ruby Male) & Riley (stinky sock lover) (Blenheim Female)
    http://www.heatherhink.com/pets.asp

  4. #14
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    I had never had that problem with Lady but now at the grand of age of nearly 10yrs she went for me She had a chew in her basket and i walked passed her and she shot out growling and snapping! iwas very shocked but maybe its her age

    Sarah Xxx

  5. #15
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    Oh poor Cookie She's got a wonderful, loving home now though and you have to concentrate on the future I'm sure you'll get there with her.

    When Charlie first came to us he was terrified of his feeding bowl and not at all keen on the bedding he brought with him.

    We binned the lot and now, almost a year later, he's a completely different dog. He's still a bit skitty and nervy but completely different in all other respects.

    I just think that rescues are very special little dogs indeed. Good luck with it all and big hugs to Cookie

  6. #16
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    I just have to say, I have to pull this up and watch from time to time! I think it is so funny!!!! Sweet little cookie asleep with her toy in her mouth and then out comes the little devil!

    She has the sweetest little face! I just LOVE this video!!!
    Heather, Fletcher (Ruby Male) & Riley (stinky sock lover) (Blenheim Female)
    http://www.heatherhink.com/pets.asp

  7. #17
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    She is soooo cute!!! Aawwww, LOL.

    I would start training the "drop it" command. I don't think it will take much to break her of this, if you look at her body language, her tail is wagging pretty much the whole time. But yeah.. you want to nip that in the bud.

    *still giggling*
    Bella's Mom

  8. #18
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    Cookie really loves her toys doesn't she However, I would be concerned if there are children in the house. Those toys are very inviting and something unpleasant could happen if a child decided they wanted to play with the cuddlies too. I suggest you work very hard on the leave it/drop it commands. Also. I would confiscate the item any time she acts this way. She should learn, maybe, that they are your toys, not hers and you can take them whenever you wish.

    Joanna

  9. #19
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    SarahG --

    I just wanted to tell you about our dog (poodle) who started showing the same behavior you describe when he was about 10-12 years old. Not so much with us humans, but with his mother, who he was never aggressive towards before. When she would walk past him from behind, he would sometimes just suddenly pounce on her ferociously for seemingly no reason.

    Our theory is that the behavior was because he became deaf in his golden years, and his vision was probably not that good, either, so when something would walk up from behind him that he couldn't hear, and probably couldn't see because of poor peripheral vision, it would really startle him and make him mad. It's like something just suddenly popped into his field of vision and completely started him. I don't know what else would explain it. He was always dominant over her, but never aggressive over her before. Then when she died at the age of 16, he mourned her so badly and he died about 6 months later, poor little soul. He had never been alone and had never been without his mommy.

    I just thought I'd mention it to see if your dog was deaf or had vision problems, and whether that could possibly be a cause.

  10. #20
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    Just have to mention that I think you're doing a wonderful job with Cookie. Who knows what she went through before she came to you. Sounds like her previous household was a bit terrifying. Have you figured out how to deal with this yet?
    Cathy
    Loving mom to Jake, Shelby and Micah

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