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Thread: Pooping problem

  1. #11
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    She seemed to be going pretty steadily at 2 times a day for the past month or so, but lately it's been 3 times. The poops are not too soft or too hard. I know in the morning when we first go out, if she doesn't poop then, I watch her like a hawk because I know it's coming. Then she usually goes again some time in the evening. I always feel so relieved after she does it outside because I think "Whoo, now I don't have to worry about her doing it inside." But lately, she somehow "saves some up" or has extra or something because she leaves us our gift in the living room when no one is watching.

    I think part of it is that we do not have a fence and we take her out on a leash. She really prefers to go out unfettered, but she's a runner, so we just can't do that. At first, we could go out with her and trust her to stay close, but no more. So I think she kind of resents being put on the leash to do her business. I want to get a fence put up, and I guess I'll have to, but we got an estimate, and it was $8,000!!!!! Yikes! I've been putting it off, but I guess I'll just have to bite the bullet and do it. We have really tight restrictions on fences in my neighborhood, too, both in terms of types of fence and offsets from the lot lines, so it kind of chops up our backyard where we have to put it, but I guess we'll do it.

    Oh well, kids, sorry, you'll have to take out student loans when you go to college in 10 years, but Daisy will have a safe place to poop!

  2. #12
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    Oh well, kids, sorry, you'll have to take out student loans when you go to college in 10 years, but Daisy will have a safe place to poop!
    LOL that's too funny.. .. Sounds like something my parents would have said to me.

    You must have a huge back yard.. 8 grand is crazy!

    I also forgot to mention that I find Kosmo doesn't poop really unless his bowels have been stimulated. If he "saved some" he will get it out by the time we are back home. I've never ever let him go potty out of my site (rarely off leash either) since I've had him because I like to know when he's gone. Come to think of it, he might be scared to go without me there some day! lol I've just always been there.. I do know the "oh wow.. he's done it" relief very well though.

    Do you just walk her in the yard or do you actually walk her when she goes poop? I know it helped for me to actually be walking. Kos usually goes after we've been walking for about 15 minutes. Good luck!
    Sara, mommy to Kosmo ~ 4 year blenheim boy and Faith 3 year b/t girl *rescue*

  3. #13
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    It's funny, but Daisy has never pooped on an actual walk around the neighborhood, only in our own yard. Maybe she's too polite?

    She walks around the yard in a zig zaggy pattern before she goes, unless she has to go really bad and then it's just run and go. I know I have just trusted her too much, too soon to tell us when she has to go out. We'll just have to take 2 steps back to what we were doing before this problem started up.

  4. #14
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    I just had the same problem. Brady is almsot 6 months, and today i let him eat his breakfast while I was getting ready for work, and I thought to myself, alright where is he, because he is always by me and will come towards me when he's done eatting. So I looked downstairs and he wasn't done eatting yet. A few more minutes passes and I see a nice pile on the carpet along with him licking it off the floor. He probably got to eatting at least half of it by the time i could stop him. I was like he knew he did something bad so he had to clean up after himself or something. That is just nasty to eat that. He seems to be alright, but I will be keeping a closer eye on him for a while until I can trust him again.
    Lauren
    Brady's Mommy (D.O.B 4/25/2006)

  5. #15
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    I know it is frustrating. This life-rearranging aspect is why a lot of people choose to get older dogs rather than puppies! It is a great deal of work. The puppy DOES require a rearranging of life and home. No doubt about it!

    We have an open plan home, too. Since we added Willow to our home, we have returned to using the xpen when we are not home. Both Cedar and Willow go into the xpen like you describe Daisy going into her crate, but it gives them extra room. Plus they can be together and play a bit.

    We generally leave our xpen up during the regular day so it is convenient, but when people come over, we fold it up and set it aside. Most people never even know it's there.

    We also have a room that has a 7 ft opening that is separate from the main open plan. When Cedar was about Daisy's age, she had access to the main floor EXCEPT for this one room. It is carpeted (rest of house isnt) and it was out of sight. So of course when she wanted to poo inside, this room was her destination.

    To limit her access to the main floor but NOT this room, we used two chairs and a fitted bedsheet to block it off. We spread the bedsheet taunt between the two chairs (the seat part was on the inside of the room, so Cedar couldnt jump up and over). It was easy to unhook or step over for people, but it was still effective keeping Cedar out. Plus, you can pick a sheet that you feel is more visually appealing (and you can always remove it when someone comes over, etc.).

    Keep up the effort. 6 months is the time when the pups start to test you. They are like 14 year old kids--they think they are ready for more independence and give signs of being ready, but most parents know they are still too young to be completely autonomous.

    Good luck!
    Cindy
    Cedar (tri), Willow (blen), Holly (ruby), & Bella (blen)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy's Mom
    Thanks for the advice. I will definitely try upping the ante somehow for the outside poops. She does poop outside most of the time, and we always give her her beloved liver treats. Maybe I'll try cheese or hotdogs. I've been trying to keep her off people food altogether, but maybe I should relax that rule for this situation. Sometimes I bring treats outside with me so I can reward her instantaneously, and sometimes I praise her lavishly outside and bring her right in and give them to her. However, if she sees me put one in my pocket before I take her out, she just goes nutso and won't even consider leaving my side long enough to poop. So I have to be sly about it.
    If you treat her outside when she poops, she will make the poop outdoors/treat connection. If you take her in the house and treat her, she will think she's being treated for coming indoors.
    Cathy Moon
    India(tri-F) Geordie(blen-M)Chocolate(b&t-F)Charlie(at the bridge)

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by arasara
    ...I did catch him pooping in the house but it only took twice of taking him outside in the middle of his duties for him to say enough of that and just go out. At first when he went I would pick him up and tell him how much of a good boy he was and give him tummy kisses - anything I could think of and he quickly caught on....
    Being able to catch them in the act is the gold standard in correcting unwanted behavior, not always easy to do, but close supervision helps. If caught in the act, and shown what is expected (not scolded), they can learn much faster than if shown what is expected after the fact. They are not great at abstract thinking.

    You have my sympathy for your barrier problem. I had Zack in an X pen in the kitchen, with his crate, blankets and toys inside the Xpen, it was 36 inches tall, and the kitchen table which hung over the crate and part of the X pen was 30" talll. Zack accepted this arrangement until one day we had a guest dog spend the night, and that apparently changed the equation and i dont' know if he was showing off for her, or trying to escape from her, or something else, but that night, he jumped out. I didn't see him, but later, he was in the pen and he did it right in front of me, he went straight up more than 30 inches to land right on the kitchen table. Pretty impressive, really. Quite the athlete. From the table, he could jump up on a shelf and then make it to freedom. He went back to not trying to escape after that phase, but to make sure, i found (with some difficulty) 48 inch high gates. Most of them are 36 inches or less, and those are not tall enough for Zack. The ones i got are made by Evenflo, but they aren't free standing.

    You might be able to find someone to make you some inexpensive freestanding gates that are taller than she can jump, but of course, they can't be next to furniture. If you can't avoid that situation, then you need to do something like crating when not supervised or what Cathy T did.

    Zack now (at one year old) has the run of the house all the time, but it was a gradual process. I think i could've trusted him more sooner but i wanted to err on the side of caution and be conservative. So, there weren't many opportunities for 'failure,' whether chewing or housetraining issues. Housetraining has really been mastered months ago, with one pee about a month and a half ago because i waited too long to let him out. I needed a little training there and he gave it to me.

    There's still an occasional chew, once a month or so, again, part of my training, him showing me what sort of thing not to leave out when i leave.

    I totally agree with the idea of exercise being something that makes all behavior management easier. If they have a lot of energy to burn, naturally they will tend to get into mischief. They don't mean to. They just have all that energy. I don't always find it easy to do this, but i believe in it, even though i don't always live up to doing it adequately, what with the work schedule and everything.

    Maybe you can give Daisy a well supervised small area of the house and when she succeeds in just that area, give her some more freedom in the house, but still keep an eye on her (boy do i know what it feels like to drag myself out of my chair, or to reluctantly interrupt something i'm doing on the internet, etc, to go see what Zack is doing), and if she makes mistakes when she's not supervised for brief moments, tighten up her structure again. Give her just small gradual increases in freedom to see if she's ready, and if she's not, hang in there and keep an eye on her. I know it's wearisome at times. When she gets a sense that she's being watched over all the time, she will internalize your expectations.

    I started leaving Zack alone free in the apartment for 10 minutes, and gradually increased it over time until he was free for 4 hours while i was at work. I can't remember now when i started doing it, probably when he was about 8 months because i remember leaving him in the kitchen when i went to work when he had just been neutered at 7 months.

    Keep the faith. She'll mature. She is training you in what she needs from you in order for you to train her.

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