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Thread: Are 2 boys cavaliers good together?

  1. #11
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    Although they don't live together, at the weekends Toby and Taffy can spend a lot of time with eachother and they are completely fine, they don't fight or anything.

    Archie on the other hand doesn't seem to get on well with either. Toby and Taffy are happy just plodding around but Archie likes to true and fight them all the time, especially over food. But i think thats down to the discipline(or lack) of that he gets.
    Mum to AJ (Blenhiem born 6th August 2010) - my world
    My beautiful, brave boy Toby (Blenhiem) now waiting for me at the Bridge, love you forever chicken!
    Auntie to:Taffy(B) &Archie(B&T) - Doggy kisses 'cos you know there the best kind!

  2. #12
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    I'm in a little different situation, but the only time we ever had a problem with the boys was the one time I accidently let a girl who was in season out of her crate when there were 2 of our intact boys in the room. Not a good thing; fortunately no injuries, just a lot of growling, snapping and posturing. I was in the doghouse for a few days over that mistake

    We do have a couple of our dogs that have "food issues" but it doesn't seem to have anything to do with whether its a male or female.
    Bruce
    MysticKnight Cavaliers

  3. #13
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    My two boys get along very well but have been in minor scraps over chews before, violent enough to draw blood, because I have one who will deliberately taunt the other with his treat sometimes and I might miss that he is doing it. They can be best of friends 99.999% of the time but never underestimate the possibility of such flashpoints with males or females. But that isn't gender related, it is just a dog management issue and is why I really encourage a good understanding of what can create potential problems. Very few dogs are serious problems in themselves; it is the management that is the issue once there is nmore than one dog in the house. Having more than one is extremely rewardingm, but also introduces new challenges. Each additional dog increases that challenge by another bit but as our breeders here with numerous dogs can testify, good management and the mild temperament of this breed generally means they are almost always easy to mix together, whatever the gender.

    Neutering definitely can make a major difference with both males and females, making it a lot easier for the average pet owner to keep more than one dog. The male dogs that I've had who were more in your face tended to be those who were unneutered still at age 5 or 6 and had very well established male behaviour patterns. Also this was dependent on the individual dog's personality, and whether it had been well socialised or not.

    Generally a puppy coming in to an existing dog household will be readily accepted and the pecking order will be established as he/she matures. Most of the time you will not even be aware of it and it will not be of any importance to you or the dogs except that each dog feels most secure and happy when it has its place -- and doesn't care where in the order it is. The problems tend to arise when the owners feel the first dog 'should be the top dog' and intervene by treating the original dog as more important even though often the dogs themselves have an order where the second is the top dog. Interfering in this way can cause enormous anxiety and make the second dog feel it has to prove its status, creating scraps where they never would have existed. So we humans can accidentally create problems that may seem like they are testosterone related but are actually created by us! That's why it is always best to treat dogs as separate but equals, too -- that helps ensure a peaceful household.

    I've always seen more issues with females with females, than males with males, but nothing really major.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  4. #14
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    You raise some interesting points, Karlin. Sometimes (usually after they have been playing, and Holly wants to settle on the sofa for a while) Holly will snap and even nip at Chloe when Chloe comes bouncing round. I've noticed it more when Holly has been beside me and Chloe wants up. Incidentally, Chloe also tries the same thing in the reverse situation! I don't normally intervene (if Holly does something that even makes Chloe yelp, she stops immediately) but in that situation I sometimes do- purely because their relative positions would make it easy for Holly to inadvertently scratch Chloe's eye. Am I right?

    How fixed does a routine have to be? Chloe doesn't have a very good 'stay' yet, so getting her to stay put while feeding Holly first, for example, is a non-starter. I get round this by feeding them separately in the morning, and then they happily share a plate of kibble and beans in the evening. No aggression there whatsoever from either, even though there's food in the equation.
    Holly - 7years
    Amber- 3 years

  5. #15
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    I couldn't agree more with Karlin's post. I had terrible aggression problems with a female that I fostered and she had to be homed a lot sooner than I would have liked (I would have kept her tbh). She had established herself as 'Top Dog' within a week of being here but her aggression was due to a very deep seated problem that even a dog psycholgist and a dog behaviouralist couldn't cure She is however, absolutely fine in her forever home with just her and her Mamma.

    Anyway, my two boys get on fine for the most of the time - except for when Charlie chooses to tease Maxx with his chewies or whatever. Maxx will try to take them and then all hell breaks loose We are probably averaging on one minor spat a month now which in the grand scheme of things isn't too bad really. It's a lot less than my human boys would argue when they were small anyway - saying that, my human boys have never, ever gotten physical with each other

    I too have seen and experienced more problems with female groups than male groups - with all dogs not just Cavaliers.

    I think the answer is to let the dogs sort themselves out in the alpha stakes - obviously, if they got TOO physical, you'd have to step in but any minor disagreements are best left for them to sort themselves. My two make me smile actually as everytime they have a falling out, they sit and give each other filthy looks and then look at me me as if to say 'It wasn't MY fault, it was HIM!'

  6. #16
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    Always had just girls..up to four in the home at once..never had a problem or cross paw between them...rescues, pups and older ones together,

    sorry can't help with the dog side of things...

    Alison, Wilts, U.K.

  7. #17
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    My two girls, Chocolate and India, have never, ever fought!

    Chocolate has never fought with Geordie, either. She is very peace loving.

    India and Geordie (our male) have gotten into fairly serious scuffles maybe 6 times a year over bully sticks. We've been putting Geordie in a crate when it's chewy time.

    India and Geordie play a lot, and one of them sometimes ends the play session on a crabby note.
    Cathy Moon
    India(tri-F) Geordie(blen-M)Chocolate(b&t-F)Charlie(at the bridge)

  8. #18
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    Sounds like it doesn't matter at all what sex they are then. It just seems that some dogs are more likely to start a scuffle than others - just like some human kids

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