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Thread: New diagnosis - anyone heard of it??

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  1. #1
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    Default New diagnosis - anyone heard of it??

    My Sasha has gone to the closest vet teaching school in Kansas - I took her down yesterday. They are doing diagnostic procedures today & tomorrow. The preliminary diagnosis may be Masticatory Myositis - anyone ever heard of it? Unfortunately, it doesn't really have anything to do with her vomiting/throwing up, so we have yet to see what can be done.

    Treatment for the above condition is steroids to loosen the jaw (which tightens up with this disorder). I have pureed her food for so long it might be why we haven't caught it before now. I wasn't too pleased today when my vet said "yea, I've heard of that" but didn't offer any other words of support - I wanted to say, "well, you didn't even slightly suggest it with Sasha". Just my edgy nerves in general I guess this week.

    Wish us luck - my little girl is mighty sick right now and lost quite a bit of weight. Last night was so lonely w/out her....

    Sheri

  2. #2
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    Dear Sheri, so sorry Sasha isn't well. I'm glad she is at the teaching hospital. Hopefully they will solve her health problems quickly.
    Cathy Moon
    India(tri-F) Geordie(blen-M)Chocolate(b&t-F)Charlie(at the bridge)

  3. #3
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    Hi Sheri,
    I've never heard of it either but I found this: http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body..._myositis.html
    I'm sure Karlin will be able to help you out though.

    your Sasha gets the right treatment and starts to gain weight.

    Sending you big s and lots of prayers for a quick positive result...


    Claire
    Once owned by Rudeepoohs
    then rescued by CaraMia and Minnie Moo.
    Missing all my girls every day....

  4. #4
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    Sheri....My heart goes out to you. It is so stressful to have a sick pet, cause they are so helpless. I am saying prayers for you and little Sasha. Hugz to you both. Lily and I will be thinking of yo both
    Sharon,
    Mom to Bleinham Cavaliers Lily, 5 years old, and Alfie, 8 year old puppy mill rescue.
    At the Bridge, Chloe, Lhasa Apso.

  5. #5
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    {{{{{{{{Sheri and Sasha}}}}}}}} hope the treatment works quickly and poor little Sasha recovers quickly and gains some weight. Take care of yourself too Sheri

  6. #6
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    Wasn't that what Cecily's little Rio had?
    Holly - 7years
    Amber- 3 years

  7. #7
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    I just adore our vet school here at Ohio State University. They are always up-to-date.

    My fil is a vet in Utah (and he's getting up there in years, sorry dad) BUT he always manages to stay up on the times and such.

    It is sad your vet just shrugged it off, maybe he was having a bad day. I would throw more questions his way, if he sees that you aren't backing down until you get some support he may be more receptive...

    Good luck and keep us all posted!
    [B][COLOR=yellowgreen]We[/COLOR] [COLOR=plum]Love [/COLOR][COLOR=yellowgreen]Cicero[/COLOR]![/B]
    [B][COLOR=yellowgreen]"Suum Cuique"[/COLOR][/B]
    (To Each Thier Own)

  8. #8
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    Yes, I have heard of this on a couple of the lists for cavaliers. It can be mild to quite serious is all I recall -- often it can be easily managed. I don't know much else about it. You must be relieved to have a diagnosis and hopefully you will have an easy case to look after too. Let us know what the doctors say as you learn more.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  9. #9
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    Hope all goes with - and that they find a quick and safe way of getting Sasha will again, hugs coming over and licks from the boys..

  10. #10
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    Masticatory Muscle Myositis (MMM) is an immune mediated disease where the body starts attacking the specific muslces of mastication (chewing). They're of a different embryologic origin than other muscles, which is why only these muscles are affected and not all muscles.

    From my internal medicine book:
    In the acute form, hypertrophy of the temporal and masseter muscles is observed with myalgia (painful eating, i think). The animal is reluctant to open its mouth. It has difficult eating and may dribble saliva. Sometimes the jaw remains open because complete closing is impossible. Fever, inflammation of tthe tonsils, and local adenitis may also be found. In most cases myositis of the masticatory muslces is a chronic condition with severe, progressive muscle atrophy accompanied by fibrosis, resulting in a reduced ability to open the mouth and trismus (lockjaw).
    The disorder is generally bilateral. Exopthalmos (bulging eye) linked to enlargement of the temporal muscles sometimes can be the cause of an optic neuritis and can result in vision disoders. Biochemical examinations are not specific, but the serum CK level may b be increased and leukocytosis (high white blood cell count) is sometimes found. Electromyography (EMG) reveals abnormal spontaneous activity. Muscle biopsy shows sites of necrosis (death) and phagocytosis (inflammatory cells eating them up) of type 2M fibers (the type particular to these muscles), with perivascular infiltration of mononucleate cells (meaning, white blood cells are coming out of the vessels to attack the 2M fibers because the body is recognizing them as foreign).
    Adminstration of immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids is the only advisable therapy. Clinical recovery and usually rapid and complete if treatment is begun early. Should a relapse occur, the maximum dose should be administered again. Sometimes a prolonged course of treatment is required, with small doses administered on alternate days. Therapy is ineffective if administered to an animal that has already experienced several inflammatory episodes that have resulted in extensive fibrosis.

    Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger and Feldman

    How's Sasha doing?? Hope she's feeling better!
    Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.
    --Roger Caras

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