Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Help!Jumping up at 1yr old girl & taking food off her.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Rayleigh, Southend-On-Sea, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Help!Jumping up at 1yr old girl & taking food off her.

    I am looking after the prettiest little girl today and have been asked if I can do this once a month. I might have to say I can't. I was worried as Dylan loves to mouth and his teeth are very sharp. That hasn't been the problem though. He won't stop jumping up to lick her face which she doesn't like and he tries to take her biscuit off her (not aggressively). I boiled up some chicken breast quickly as a bribe and I have his attention more because of that but not completely. Do you have any advice please?

    I'm wondering if I should say I can't do it in future or use it as an oportunity to train him with little kids.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    506
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'd take the opportunity to learn from it. She won't get hurt. Wesley jumps on my 16 month old and can knock her onto her bottom and he also tries to steal her food from her. She only gets a little startled, but is never hurt.

    I'd love to hear some input on how to kick this behavior.

    Only thing I've really read or heard is that when they approach people they are to sit. If they sit there, you give them a reward.

    Not sure about what to do about the food stealing though...
    Mother to...
    Wesley, blenheim
    Daisy, Tricolor
    & two human rugrats!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Posts
    1,742
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I am not sure what would be the best tactic of teaching Dylan to not jump on her, espicially if she will only be there once a month. I think you would have to think of a way that you can practice not jumping even when the little girl is not around. Good luck!

    I know it is not your call, as it is not your child Pauline, but I think it is good for small children to be around dogs from the get go. I have a distant cousin who is 2. His parents have always told him "Dogs are bad! Dogs will bite you and hurt you!" He is PETRIFIED of my dogs..even teeny tiny Tilly. He screams bloody murder around them and tries to kick them. I usually just go home when they show up to family events Wesley's mom, sounds like you are doing both your puppy and your baby a favor by socializing them with each other.
    Lindsay
    Proud mom of Spencer (tri), Izzy (blen), Tilly (tri) and Howie the cava-cat

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Pauline!
    Maybe you can start to focus on teaching Dylan to properly play and socialize with children now. If it's once a month that you may look after the little girl, than you have some time to prepare. Take him to parks- kids always want to meet a little puppy.

    I really wanted Coco to get along with kids and babies (my sister-in-law isn't so crazy about dogs and she is having a baby in July. I still want to be invited to family events!) so I make a special effort to carefully have Coco approach kids with their parents. She was definitely nervous when she first met the girl across the street who had all her friends over (they ran across the street screaming, "puppy!!", when Coco was just 10 weeks or so), but with time she's gotten so much better.

    I keep her on a very short leash, nevertheless. And I think it may be a good idea to let the pup sniff the child's hand first. Oh and praise him and give him treats after a good meeting. I'm sure you already know this, but it may help with looking after the little girl too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    732
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Probably the best thing to do is to get physically between Dylan and the little girl and say "No!" when she's jumping. Otherwise, she doesn't understand that it is not acceptable behavior. You have to show Dylan that the little girl is off-limits when he is in jumping mode and can only be approached in a calm manner. Having a leash on him would also help because you can get him in a sitting position near the girl (and of course, stop the jumping up). Rewarding him in that position in her presence would be very good.

    It is very hard, especially when the dog is food-motivated (as our Daisy is), but with lots of repetition, it can be taught. Daisy just gets very over-excited around kids because she loves them, so we are still working on keeping her from jumping. She has improved, but she still has a ways to go.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Rayleigh, Southend-On-Sea, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you for your replies. Kind of you to go inot such detail.

    Both Dylan and the little girl went to sleep at around 11am. When Dylan woke up he was a lot calmer with her. My friend rang to ask how I was getting on and she looks after the little girl and has two "in your face" Jack Russells. She said just let them get on with it. Dylan will calm down, and he did.

    I started yesterday trying to train Dylan to wait when I put his food down. I was advised to do this in case he decides to snatch some food from a kid so good timing.

    I might ask to have her over more often. Her mum can't afford child care so she has asked 4 ladies from my congregation including myself to look after her daughter one day a week. So it's only once a month for me as I said. I could offer to cover for them too.

    I enjoyed looking after her. Is it just me or do other peoples kids call you mum? Most of the little ones I've looked after over the years called me mum.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Pauline, that's so cute that they call you mum!

    It's good to hear that Dylan got calmer. I'm sure he'll take cues from you and learn to behave properly. That's great that you are training him to wait. I liked the other ideas too, like teaching him "off" or "leave it".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Rayleigh, Southend-On-Sea, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks. It is lovely that they call me Mum. I just think Auntie is a mouthful for them though I don't encourage them to call me mum.

    How is Coco feeling now? I was quite upset for her that they didn't give pain killers after her spay. She has such a lovely face.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Coco is doing so much better now. Thanks for asking. I'm so relieved. She was just so lifeless for those couple of days, in so much pain. They gave her an injection of morphine after the surgery, but nothing after that. I asked the night we picked her up and the next morning for painkillers, but the vet said it wasn't needed. I feel horrible thinking about it! I should have been more aggressive.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    401
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Pauline.... The best thing you can do to correct this behavior with Dylan is to practice greeting people. Get a friend or family member and take turns coming through the front door. Put his leash on him and the person inside should lay the leash on the floor and step on the middle of it so that Dylan won't be able to jump. When he stops trying to jump, praise him and give him a treat. You could also hold a treat in your hand and use the same technique when Dylan jumps up to try and get it. Have the other person give him a different treat when he stops trying to jump.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •