Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Agressive behaviour??

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    23,991
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Keep in mind a puppy isn't an adult and needs to be handled and gently socialised over time. They just cannot cope with constant attention. I would not force yourself on her -- never try to make a puppy bond -- you have to let pups and adult dogs do this in their own time. I regularly home rescues and the best piece of advice I learned from experienced rescue mentors and which I pass along to new homes is: do NOT fuss over the dog, do not overwhelm him or her with attention, do not assume they are already the dog you want them to become. Let them be who they are right now and grow to trust you. Most animals need a bit of time to learn that and make that shift, most especially, rescues and young puppies.

    Or look at it from the dog's perspective and remember when you were a small child. I am sure we all remember the adults we just didn;t like because they constantly fussed over us, invaded our space by wanting to hug and kiss us when we hardly knew them, and wouldn't leave us alone (certain elderly aunts might spring to mind! ). This can be absolutely exhausting and frustrating and overwhelming for a human child -- just as it is for a dog or cat, puppy or kitten. In addition you have to allow for personalities -- many dogs simply are more aloof by nature than others. Often females are a bit more aloof than males. They won;t be encouraged to bond by being forced to interact. Indeed iot can cause them to become snappy out of anxiety and frustration. They will bond and settle by *being allowed to in their own time*.

    I would forget brushing -- puppies do not need brushing and this is either totally overstimulating her into play fighting with the brush and your hands or is truly bothering her. Just get the softest puppy brush you can, and once a week, gently brush her for no more than 10-15 seconds. If she hates this, just touch her with the brush and don;t actually brush her. Over the coming months you can work up to a longer time. Do not bear down on her; hardly touch her with the brush. All you need to do is get her used to being handled over time for when she does need grooming -- but that is unloikely to be necessary for half a year or more.

    If a puppy is too difficult for you, I'd suggest going back to talk to the breeder and see if you could opt for an older dog. Many breeders have dogs of 6 months of age or older, inclduing retired breeding dogs of 5 or 6. It may be that a more settled nd mature dog would be a better choice? This is often the case for someone who doesn't want to go through the challenging first year of puppyhood again (many of us, including me, feel that way -- after one puppy, my next two were adults!). You have many, many months ahead of trying to manage and train a puppy and if you have any uncertainties about this or this particular puppy, it might be much happier for the pup and for you to think about talking again to your breeder. A puppy that is extremely outgoing and active is going to be the same as an adult -- a very active, confident and forthright dog -- which may be a challenge for some homes to manage. It is worth sitting down and thinking through all this with both heart AND head to consider whether you are prepared for 10-12 years of the adult dog this puppy will become; and perhaps go back to the breeder with any concerns.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    merseyside
    Posts
    261
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What a difference a day makes Yesterday I thought,if Ellie doesnt want to sit on my knee then so be it. She usually just sits at the end of the settee on a blanket and I had been putting her onto my knee and she would promptly get off and go back to the blanket.......So I stopped putting her onto my knee and last night she just came onto my knee by herself. Also today when I sit down she comes straight to me
    Today was the first time she could go out walking, so we took her to the park.....She loved it. She wanted to say hello to everyone even the ducks I saw a Great Dane walking towards her....was she bothered......course not So I think I have a very friendly outgoing puppy who seems afraid of nothing......AND she wants to sit on my lap....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    727
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm so happy for you..... . She might have felt a little overwhelmed. She just left her home and siblings and came into a new environment.

    Even though everyones intentions were good, maybe she was just getting a little too much attention.

    Sounds like she might be settling in.
    Sharon, proud Mom of Scout (tri) and Breeze (Newfie)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default tip for ellies' aggression

    Hi anne,
    I just wanted to let you know that I got my little girl at a very young age and I was VERY concerned about her growling and aggressive behavior and there is this weird trick i learned and it seemed to help. You pick them up supporting the whole underside with your hands until they can't touch the ground with their paws and they might squirm and feel out of control and try to get out of your hands but keep holding them just a couple of inches off the ground until she calms down and then let her go and say good girl. It sounds strange but i think it is supposed to teach them that you are in control or something like that. I just know that after about a month Missi just completely stopped all aggression and growling and is the sweetest dog i have ever been around now. Hope this helps. hang in there
    Robin

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Whitby, Ontario
    Posts
    1,082
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: tip for ellies' aggression

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenix5281
    Hi anne,
    I just wanted to let you know that I got my little girl at a very young age and I was VERY concerned about her growling and aggressive behavior and there is this weird trick i learned and it seemed to help. You pick them up supporting the whole underside with your hands until they can't touch the ground with their paws and they might squirm and feel out of control and try to get out of your hands but keep holding them just a couple of inches off the ground until she calms down and then let her go and say good girl. It sounds strange but i think it is supposed to teach them that you are in control or something like that. I just know that after about a month Missi just completely stopped all aggression and growling and is the sweetest dog i have ever been around now. Hope this helps. hang in there
    Robin
    OK I think I needed this tid bit of advice!! Kodee is mostly very playful and laps are too much in demand. But she does have issues with feet, big time depending on your mood - the angel can become the devil without notice! This, advice of yours just might help - or at least save my toes for a minute!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    2,466
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have to do that with Faith sometimes but it's not intentional. WHen I take her out to go potty she squirms like a mad woman. The safest thing I can do is just hold her out until she stops squirming - God knows I don't want to drop her.

    Debbie,

    If you don't want Kodee biting your feet and socks and jeans when you walk, spray yourself with bitter apple. She will get a rude awakening but my trainer just did this with her GSD and she stopped instantaneously.
    Sara, mommy to Kosmo ~ 4 year blenheim boy and Faith 3 year b/t girl *rescue*

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Whitby, Ontario
    Posts
    1,082
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arasara
    I have to do that with Faith sometimes but it's not intentional. WHen I take her out to go potty she squirms like a mad woman. The safest thing I can do is just hold her out until she stops squirming - God knows I don't want to drop her.

    Debbie,

    If you don't want Kodee biting your feet and socks and jeans when you walk, spray yourself with bitter apple. She will get a rude awakening but my trainer just did this with her GSD and she stopped instantaneously.
    hmm I spray alot of things she goes for, but had not thought of my shoes! I may have to spray ALL of my youngest though - Kodee thinks she is a chew toy

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Belfast
    Posts
    1,632
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've heard that tip as well, but trust me, if you have a wriggler then it's potentially dangerous.

    As for the cuddle thing, I think it's something most pups grow into. Holly was a lone pup who had been neglected and abused as a tiny baby. When rescued at 8 weeks by the breeders I got her from, they had no pups in the house, so Holly had more human rather than dog socialisation from that age. As a result, she loved cuddling- especially women. Men she didn't trust for a while.

    Amber had a normal puppyhood with her littermates. She was ten weeks when I got her and was a bit of a shock- she didn't seem to want to be cuddled much at all. Then at about 16 weeks or so that changed totally and now she's more of a cuddlebug than Holly! Holly is often happy enough to take herself off to the sofa. Eight times out of ten, Amber wants to be with me. They really do have their own personalities and as litle babies they're not necessarily temperamentally representative of the breed, but very often become so as they mature.
    Holly - 7years
    Amber- 3 years

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •