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Thread: Recommendations for homecooked diets

  1. #1
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    Default dog food recipes

    These were posted over on a cavalier email list and I thought people might want to try them out:

    SOUP
    Homemade soup is great for your dog and yourself! Never use canned soup; the sodium content is too high and, once again, it is not fresh.

    Give your dog soup over rice, pasta or even his commercial dry food or just let him lap it up! This recipe takes 10 minutes for preparation and then 4 hours to cook SLOWLY over simmering heat on the stove.

    Alternate each week or monthly with the following: Beef marrow bone
    soup or beef oxtails, fish soup (try to get the head and tail part with
    bones included. Only use "fin and tail" fish, not shellfish or bottom
    feeders. Also, make chicken and turkey soup.

    These homemade soups provide your dog's body with the gelatinous
    substance that is needed for his body to create collagen. It is great for
    joints, bones and connective tissue. Many years ago, our grandparents would
    consume homemade soup or broth daily. They knew the importance of it in
    their daily diet. They also shared it with their pets. In fact, homemade
    soup was always the basis for their homemade pet food.

    Ingredients:
    Beef Marrow Bones (or Chicken Thighs, Turkey carcass or leg or Fish)

    3 - 4 potatoes or 2-3 cups rice or barley (pre- made)

    Veggies - pick from this list: 4 -5 - carrots, kale, beets, spinach (not good if dog has kidney problems), green beans, zucchini, yellow squash,
    broccoli, parsley. Garlic - optional (use just 2 cloves when first introducing it to your dog's system, build up to more once they
    are accustomed to it).

    Olive oil ( 2 - 3 TBLS.)

    Water (filtered, if you can't trust your water system).

    Method:
    Cut the veggies into chunk sized pieces. Put all ingredients into a
    large stock pot, fill 3/4 with water. Bring to a rolling boil,
    then turn down to simmer. Simmer for 4 hours. (You can also use a crock pot. This recipe is the only one that we cook for long periods of time.)

    Take off the stove and ladle everything, except the marrow bones,
    into a blender. Take the marrow bones (or all bones) and remove the marrow
    into the mixture.

    Blend all ingredients together until thick. Discard the marrow bones
    (and all bones)! DO NOT give these to your dog! Only raw bones are to be
    given to your dog. These bones have been cooked and softened, increasing the
    chances of them breaking up and splintering in your dogs intestines.

    Pour the soup mixture into daily-sized containers. Put some in the
    freezer for the following week, use the rest in the next 2 -3 days.

    For chicken, turkey or fish , do the same as above, but you may blend
    the bones in with the whole mixture if you have a good blender. To make sure
    that all of the bones are blended well, strain your mixture through a fine
    strainer.

    YOGI CASSEROLE

    Ingredients:
    Use one of the following meats: ground chicken, turkey, or beef. You also can use beef hearts, tri tip beef or liver, but before you put them in the casserole dish, these meats should be put in a small amount of water in a sauce pan, brought to a slight boil ONLY. Let cool for a few minutes, then blend in a blender or food processor to cut up for the casserole.

    For the veggies, choose 1 - 3 of the following: zucchini, yellow squash,
    carrots, broccoli, kale, green beans, spinach.

    Cottage cheese
    Oats
    Eggs
    Olive oil
    Parsley

    Method:
    Take the meat mixture and put in the bottom of a casserole dish.

    Grate the veggies over the meat mixture. Layer that with the cottage
    cheese. Take handfuls of oats and scatter as a crust over the cottage
    cheese. Beat the eggs with olive oil and pour over the crust.

    Bake at preheated 350 degree oven for 10 minutes.

    Remember, if the dish is runny, it is NOT for your eyes but for your
    dog's stomach! He's not interested in what it looks like!

    This meal can also just be made vegetarian, if you don't have any meat.

    Be creative with this dish. Don't always use the same ingredients. Remember,
    your dog likes variety, too!

    Bone Appetit!
    Master Dog Chef Micki
    Voisard runs Dog Chefs of America
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  2. #2
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    Default Liver Cake

    Give this a try, your dogs will love it, mine sit waiting for it to cook, its a must for all training classes and shows.

    1 lb Lambs liver (organic if you can get it)
    1 large mug full of Porridge Oats
    1 table spoon bran (the type you feed to horses/rabbits etc - not human breakfast bran if possible)
    1 whole bulb of garlic, peeled
    2 eggs


    Bung the whole lot in a food processor, zap it till a thick, heavy liquid. Pour into a pre-lined, greased oven tray and bake at 190 degrees C for about 20 minutes. Cut into cubes while still warm, allow to cool and freeze. Thats if the dogs will let you. Its a great hit in our house.

    Or a nother way is

    1lb of liver (any)
    2 eggs (medium or large)
    4-6 tablesthingys flour (plain or S.R)
    garlic (optional but the dogs love it)
    METHOD
    1. Liquidise liver in food processor (with optional garlic)
    2. Add eggs, then flour to give cake dropping consistency.
    3. Pour into microwaveable dish.
    4. Microwave (uncovered) for 10 min. (650 watt oven)
    5. Allow to cool before turning out & cutting up.
    As it cools it shrivels up & looks awful. LOL
    6. Refrigerate or freezeN& use as required.
    NOTE.

    You are likely to loose a few fingers if you arent carfull as all dogs LOVE liver cake.
    Sarah

  3. #3
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    Default Light diet and poorly tums recipes

    For poorly tummies:

    Baked potato {jacket potato} – leave to cool and cut into small pieces – including the jacket
    2 tbs BIO {live} natural yoghurt

    Easy to digest and quickly sorts out tummies!

    Alternatively, 1 slice wholemeal bread soaked in tea sweetened with honey – and left to cool – this is very popular. Tea and honey are nutural antibiotics.


    Light diet {for poorly doglets or those recovering from surgery etc}:

    Proportions are one egg to one slice of brown bread, a little sugar, splash of skimmed milk.

    Mix egg, milk and sugar, tear bread and mash in mixture, cook in microwave for two minutes (or until egg is cooked), leave to cool - feed at tepid heat.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for these Karlin, I'd never thought of giving them soup - although I make a lot of homemade soup for us

    Will try to get some beef marrowbones from the butchers {EEK, hate going in there, I'm a veggie!!} and have a go - will let you know how they get on.

    This would be great for Peaches especially with her problems
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  5. #5
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    Default Homecooked recipes

    Came across this from CBS news today:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/...in680504.shtml

    [/quote]
    Canine Homecooked Cuisine
    NEW YORK, March 16, 2005


    (CBS) Dog food has taken on a whole new meaning. The days of canned dog food made of who-knows-what are long gone. Not only are dogs eating better than ever before. Homecooking has gone to the dogs.

    The Early Show resident veterinarian, Dr. Debbye Turner, offers the following details on how to become a dog chef.

    Cooking for your dog sounds like such a good idea but Turner cautions you, that even if you do it from time to time, it takes commitment to ensure your dog is getting their required nutrition. Plus, she warns that once some dogs get a taste of homecooked meals, they may be reluctant to eat the commercial food.

    Turner caught up with an Arizona woman who is teaching dog owners how to become dog chefs.

    "I think its just it bascially comes down to the vitality and the health," Micki Voisard tells Turner as she teaches one of her classes.

    Voisard runs Dog Chefs of America, a program that teaches dog owners how to cook canine meals. She started cooking for her dogs nearly a decade ago after she changed to a healthier way of eating and noticed the effects right away. Voisard now would love to see everyone learn how to cook canine.

    Just like people, dogs need meat and vegetables in their diet. So her recipes include healthy portions of both. But she does caution new dog chefs.

    Voisard says, "We don't want to overwhelm our dogs with a lot of vegetables at first."

    A gradual transition is easier on you and your dog's digestive tract. For the most part, dogs can eat the foods we eat. But stay away from raisin and grapes, onions, garlic, spices--including salt--most nuts and all junk foods.

    Also not all commercial dog food is bad. Voisard even feeds her dogs commercial dog food to help fill all their nutritional requirements.

    She says, "My dogs get commercial dog food at least 3 to 4 times a week."

    This ensures your dog is getting all the nutrition she needs. Feeding a dog an exclusively homecooked diet would take a lot of effort and attention to nutritional detail.

    Even once a week takes planning and commitment. Which for some serious owners is not a problem.

    Asked one dog food chef in training why she wants to do this for her dog, she says, "Beause I want him around a long time he's really important to me."

    Of course, what's important to the dog is a tasty meal.

    The following are two of the recipes Voisard teaches at The Basic Cooking Class:

    SOUP
    Homemade soup is great for your dog and yourself! Never use canned soup, it has too high of a sodium content and once again, it is NOT fresh!

    Give your dog soup over rice, pasta or even his commercial dry food or just let him lap it up! This recipe takes 10 minutes for preparation and then 4 hours to cook SLOWLY over simmer heat on the stove.

    Alternate each week or monthly with the following: Beef marrow bone
    soup or beef oxtails, Fish soup (try to get the head and tail part with
    bones included. Only use "fin and tail" fish, not shellfish or bottom
    feeders. Also, make chicken and turkey soup.

    These homemade soups provide your dog's body with the gelatinous
    substance that is needed for his body to create collagen. It is great for
    joints, bones and connective tissue. Many years ago, our grandparents would
    consume homemade soup or broth daily. They knew the importance of it in
    their daily diet. They also shared it with their pets. In fact, homemade
    soup was always the basis for their homemade pet food.

    INGREDIENTS
    Beef Marrow Bones (or Chicken Thighs, Turkey carcass or leg or Fish)

    3 -4 potatoes or 2-3 cups rice or barley (pre- made)

    Veggies - pick from this list: 4 -5 - carrots, kale, beets, spinach (not good if dog has kidney problems), green beans, zucchini, yellow squash,
    broccoli, parsley. Garlic - optional (use just 2 cloves when first introducing it to your dog's system, build up to more once they
    are accustomed to it.

    Olive oil ( 2 - 3 TBLS.)

    Water (filtered, if you can'tt trust your water system.

    Method:
    Cut the veggies into chunk sized pieces. Put all ingredients into a
    large stock pot, fill 3/4s with water. Bring to a rolling boil,
    then turn down to simmer. Simmer for 4 hours. (You can also use a crock pot. This recipe is the only one that we cook for
    long periods of time.)

    Take off of the stove and ladle everything, except the marrow bones,
    into a blender. Take the marrow bones (or all bones) and remove the marrow
    into the mixture.

    Blend all ingredients together until thick. Discard the marrow bones
    (and all bones)! DO NOT give these to your dog! Only raw bones are to be
    given to your dog. These bones have been cooked and softened, increasing the
    chances of them breaking up and splintering in your dogs intestines.

    Pour the soup mixture into daily sized containers. Put some in the
    freezer for the following week, use the rest in the next 2 -3 days.

    For chicken, turkey or fish - do the same as above, but you may blend
    the bones in with the whole mixture if you have a good blender. To make sure
    that all of the bones are blended well, strain your mixture through a fine
    strainer.

    YOGI CASSEROLE

    Ingredients:
    Use one of the following meats: ground chicken, turkey, beef or *beef
    hearts, *tri tip beef or *liver.

    For the veggies, choose 1 -3 of the following: zucchini, yellow squash,
    carrots, broccoli, kale, green beans, spinach.

    Cottage cheese
    Oats
    Eggs
    Olive oil
    Parsley

    Method:
    Take the meat mixture and put in the bottom of a casserole dish. (*
    These meats should be put in a small amount of water in a sauce pan, bring
    to a slight boil ONLY. Let cool for a few minutes, then blend in a blender
    or food processor to cut up for the casserole.)

    Grate the veggies over the meat mixture. Layer that with the cottage
    cheese. Take handfuls of oats and scatter as a crust over the cottage
    cheese. Beat the eggs with olive oil and pour over the crust.

    Bake at preheated 350 degree oven for 10.

    Remember, if the dish is runny, it is NOT for your eyes but for your
    dog's stomach! He's not interested in what it looks like!

    This meal can also just be made vegetarian, if you don't have any meat.

    Be creative with this dish, don'tt always use the same ingredients. Remember,
    your dog likes variety too!

    Bone Apetit!
    Master Dog Chef Micki

    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  6. #6
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    Default Recommendations for homecooked diets

    This is a great free dog-related newsletter to subscribe to. I thought this edition would be of general interest so am reposting here under permissions granted by the distributor. You can visit their website/subscribe to the newsletter here: http://b-naturals.com/

    Putting It All Together – Cooked Diets

    B-Naturals Newsletter

    April 2006

    By
    Lew Olson
    PhD Natural Health, LMSW-ACP


    Putting It All Together – Cooked Diets

    For those just joining us now, I suggest you read the first seven segments of this 12 month course to help catch up. You can find these first seven segments in the B-Naturals Newsletter Directory or click on the following links:

    Ø History of Dog Food-August 2005, http://b-naturals.com/Aug2005.php
    Ø Digestion & Anatomy of the Canine-September 2005, http://b-naturals.com/Sep2005.php
    Ø Protein in the Diet-November, 2005 http://b-naturals.com/Nov2005.php
    Ø Carbohydrates in the Dog’s Diet-December, 2005 http://b-naturals.com/Dec2005.php
    Ø Fats and Fatty Acids-January, 2006 http://b-naturals.com/Jan2006.php
    Ø Minerals-February, 2006 http://b-naturals.com/Feb2006.php
    Ø Supplements and Uses, March 2006 http://b-naturals.com/March2006.php

    These first seven articles lay the ground work for understanding nutritional needs of dogs. This month’s article focuses on understanding the concepts and preparing home made meals for your dogs at home.

    Remember these rules:

    1) Always balance a home cooked meal with calcium. You cannot feed cooked bones to dogs safely, and when you are feeding a diet without bones, you need to add either 900 mg of calcium per pound of food served, OR ½ teaspoon of ground egg shell. Save eggshells and dry overnight, and grind in a clean coffee bean grinder.
    2) Use variety when preparing meals. Each protein type contains different amounts of amino acids. Good variety would include beef, pork, chicken, turkey, lamb and fish as well as eggs and dairy. You can bake fresh fish or used canned, such as mackerel, salmon or sardines. These types of canned fish contain steamed bones that are safe and so you do not need to add calcium when feeding these.
    3) Use organ meat for about 10% of the diet. Organ meat includes liver or kidney.
    4) Use animal protein sources for at least 50% of the diet, preferably 75% of the diet. Animal protein sources would include meat, organ meat, dairy products (plain yogurt or cottage cheese) and eggs.
    5) Use vegetables for the rest of the diet. Vegetables must be fully boiled, steamed, frozen, pureed in a food processor or mashed into a mush. Dogs cannot digest vegetables unless they are cooked or pulverized, as they are unable to digest cellulose, which makes up the plants cell walls. Variety also applies to vegetable choices. For dogs with arthritis, it's best to avoid the nightshade veggies (white potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and peppers), as these can be irritating.
    6) If you want to use grains, please make these less than 1/6 of the diet. Grains will increase bulk of the stool and some dogs have intolerances to some forms of grain. Remember that dogs have no nutritional need for carbohydrates, and that grains have been linked to a number of health problems, including arthritis, allergies, seizures, etc.

    Now that you have a few simple rules to follow, we will look at how to make some basic recipes. The basic formula I like to follow is 75% animal protein and fat sources, and 25% vegetable. In certain health conditions, this can vary but I will address that in a future article on special needs. Please remember that a diet of 75% meat, yogurt, eggs, etc is not a diet that is 75% protein. These foods also contain moisture, fat and some fiber. Also remember as discussed in the prior protein article, a healthy dog cannot have too much protein, in fact it is more important than to feed too little. Dogs, as carnivores need animal proteins for organ integrity and health.

    For the animal protein percentage of the diets, use a variety of this selection of foods:

    Muscle meat (meat can be ground or in pieces):
    beef, chicken, lamb, pork, turkey, canned mackerel, salmon or sardines. Note: Heart is considered a muscle meat nutritionally and should be included in the diet.
    Dairy:
    Yogurt, cottage cheese
    Organ meat (10% of the diet)
    Beef, chicken, lamb or pork liver and kidney
    Other:
    Eggs, canned tripe, healthy leftovers

    For the vegetables, use a variety of this selection of vegetables:

    Broccoli, cabbage, zucchini, cauliflower, spinach, sweet potato, carrots, yellow summer squash, kale, mustard greens

    Remember, variety is very important. A recipe can be made up in bulk, and frozen into meal sized portions and thawed the night before meal times.

    A quote from Dr Mike DVM says: http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/drawmeat.html

    "I think the major problem with owner prepared diets is an attempt to satisfy the needs of pets by making one recipe and not varying it. I strongly suspect that if pets were fed a variety of foods that approximates the food triangle suggested for humans that an adequate diet would be obtained. On the other hand, trying to formulate a single recipe that meets the needs of pets long term is very difficult to do. I do not know about other vets but I think that the major reason to stick with pet foods is the incredible ability of pets to train their owners to feed them unbalanced and/or unhealthy diets. A great many of the pets I see who are fed primarily home-made diets or table scraps eat only a few items consistently. Feeding pet foods helps avoid this problem. I am not particularly uncomfortable with the notion of people feeding a variety of foods in an attempt to meet dietary requirements as long as they are aware of the pitfalls and avoid them."
    The amount to feed is approximately 2% to 3% of the dog’s body weight. Basically this breaks down into this:

    (one pound equals approximately two cups)

    100 lb dog = 2 lb to 3 lb daily, or two meals of 1 to 1 ½ lbs each
    75 lb dog = 1 ½ lb to 2 ¼ lb daily or two meals of 12 oz to 18 oz each
    50 lb dog = 1 lb to 1 ½ lb daily, or two meals of 8 oz to 12 oz each
    25 lb dog = 8 oz to 12 oz daily, or two meals of 4 oz to 6 oz each

    Smaller dogs often have higher metabolisms, and *may* (not always) need more than the 2% to 3% of their body weight, and often do better with three smaller meals a day, especially toy breeds.

    ** Puppies under the age of six months require more frequent meals (three to four a day) and need a bit more calcium, at about 1500 mg per pound of food served while they are growing. Puppies will eat about 10% of their body weight at 8 weeks of age or 2% to 3% of their anticipated adult weight

    For supplements, calcium is needed at 900 mg per pound of food served. I would also recommend the EPA fish oil capsules at one capsule (180 EPA/120 DHA) per twenty to thirty pounds of body weight daily. Do not add minerals, as the variety in the diet will provide this. Do add vitamins, such as vitamin E, vitamin C and a B complex. For diet changes, probiotics and digestive enzymes may be helpful. Berte's Immune Blend contains vitamin C, vitamin E, B complex, enzymes and probiotics. For a daily vitamin blend without enzymes and probiotics, there is also Berte's Daily Blend that contains kelp and alfalfa which can provide trace minerals.

    Let’s look a recipe formula as an example for a typical 50 pound adult dog:

    ¾ lb hamburger (12 oz)
    ¼ lb plain yogurt (4 oz)
    2 oz liver
    6 oz pureed sweet potato
    1350 mg of calcium
    2 EPA fish oil capsules
    1 ½ teaspoons Berte’s Immune Blend

    This recipe makes two meals. Divide the recipe in half and feed two meals daily.

    Another recipe could be:

    ¾ lb chicken (12 oz)
    1/8 lb cottage cheese (2 oz)
    1 egg (approximately 2 oz)
    2 oz beef kidney
    6 oz mix of cooked cabbage and zucchini
    1350 mg of calcium
    2 EPA fish oil capsules
    1 ½ teaspoons Berte's Immune Blend

    For a 100 lb dog, double the amounts above, and divide into two meals. For a twenty five pound, cut the recipe in half and divide into two meals. Just remember, calcium is added at 900 mg per pound of food served.

    In place of the hamburger or chicken selection, you can use canned salmon, canned mackerel, turkey, lamb, beef heart, or ground pork.

    Vegetables can be mixed and matched from broccoli, cabbage, zucchini, cauliflower, spinach, sweet potato, carrots, yellow summer squash, kale and mustard greens.

    If you are out of dairy products or eggs, add more meat. When you use canned fish, do not add calcium, as mackerel, sardines and salmon already have steamed bones.

    I would suggest using as much variety as possible, and making large batches in advance to freeze for each meal. That way, the meals can be taken out of the fridge at night and thawed for the next days use. Do add the supplements right before serving, as freezing can compromise their integrity. Always keep canned fish (mackerel, salmon or sardines) on hand, as well as canned tripe and dairy to feed *if* you forget to make meals in advance. These are also good to take on road trips, when boarding or when you have a pet sitter.

    You can adjust the amount of vegetables to a higher percentage if needed, but remember- the more fiber, the larger and more odorous the stool. And if you are just changing diets now, you may want to get the Berte’s Ultra Probiotic and Berte’s Zyme to use for a few months for the diet change adjustment.

    I hope you find this helpful, and if you still have questions, please join our K9Nutrition list at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K9Nutrition/ where you can get many of your questions answered. I know your dog will enjoy a fresh food diet, and Bone Appetite!

    Product Specials

    Free Freight Friday is April 21, 2006: Any orders placed on this day only over $75.00 will be shipped freight free (continental US only) via UPS Ground. Mark this date on your calendar! NOTE: Qualifying orders will have freight deducted at the time the order is shipped and processed.

    Newsletter Notes

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    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  7. #7
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    Default

    More recipes for homecooked meals:

    Baci Chicken
    For dogs or cats, though cats may prefer it with a fillet of sole.

    Makes about 5 cups

    u 1 medium to large boneless chicken breast (may use other cuts but remove any and all bones); organic, ranch-grown
    u 5 cups water (preferably bottled or reverse osmosis)
    u 1 medium sweet potato
    u 1 cup brown rice
    u 1 stalk of celery
    u 4 medium carrots
    u 4 broccoli florets
    Do not add seasonings like salt or pepper; your dog doesn't need them.
    Put water in large pot. Place the chicken in and cook over high heat for about 10 minutes.
    After washing the vegetables, cut them into 1/2 inch pieces or cubes.
    Turn the heat down to simmer and add the sweet potato, brown rice, carrots and celery to the pot.
    Simmer for approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours before adding the broccoli. Simmer another 5-10 minutes or until most of the liquid has been absorbed, extract the chicken and cube or shred and return to the pot. Let cool at least 30 minutes before feeding.
    Mixture may be stored in the refrigerator and fed over the course of a week.
    — Happy Tails Pet Services


    Slightly Cooked Muffins
    For dogs

    Yield varies according to choice of meats and vegetables

    u About 1 pound of meat, chosen from the following list: chicken, turkey, lamb, beef tri-tip, beef hearts, beef or chicken liver, ostrich or use these canned meats every couple of weeks: sardines (in water only), salmon, jack mackerel
    u One vegetable, chosen from the following: one medium zucchini or yellow squash, 1/2 cup spinach (avoid if dog has kidney problems), one medium beet, 1/2 cup parsley, 1/2 cup green beans, one stalk broccoli, one medium carrot.
    u 2 to 3 eggs
    u 2 tablespoons olive oil
    u Old-fashioned oats
    u Cottage or ricotta cheese (optional)
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    If you are using fresh meat or poultry, place in a pot with enough water to just cover by 1-2 inches. Bring just to boil, do not go over boiling point. Remove from heat. Let mixture cool.
    Grate vegetable into a bowl.
    In separate bowl, beat the eggs with the olive oil. Add to the veggie.
    Put meat through food processor (unless it is already ground), reserving the cooking broth. Add ground meat to vegetable mixture.
    If using canned fish, just open and add to vegetable.
    Add the reserved cooking broth.
    Add just enough oats to mix to keep the muffins together but don't overdo. A little cottage or ricotta cheese can also be used to hold batter together.
    Spoon mixture into muffin tins or onto a cookie sheet.
    Bake 6-8 minutes. Can be frozen.
    — Dog Chefs of America
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

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