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Thread: Please help!!! Is this really the most important thing

  1. #1
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    Default Please help!!! Is this really the most important thing

    Yesterday I was really in a bad state with leaky eyes and heavy heart. But, so many kind and considerate CTFers came back to tell me not to give up trying to find a pup.

    My final question for all that have a Cavalier. Is it written in stone that a physical fence is required to own a Cavalier? I was under the impression they made good indoor companions and for people that don't own homes and live in apartments.

    Granted a responsible owner would have to walk a dog on a regular daily basis. Not only for the pup to do its business, but also exercise not excluding socializing with others, be it 4 or 2 legged kind!

    I just had a owner/groomer turn me down for a lanky dog that did not meet her expectations as a potential show dog. She's a Blenheim 11 months old and the owner flat out turned me down because I don't have a fence!

    Does everyone here on the forum live in a home with a fenced in yard? Any of you live in an apartment? How do you exercise your dog on a day-to-day?

    Sad and now confused

  2. #2
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    I do have a fence but there are lots of folks on the list who do not. I think lots of breeders and rescue groups prefer to have folks with fences because it gives them a comfort level that their "charges" will be able to be outside to run and play. I think you need to have a plan for how you are going to get exercise for your little one, including walks, trips to any dog parks in the area (particularly if it has a small dog area) or some other public area that is fenced where dogs can run, taking your dog to training classes, visits to relatives or friends who do have yards, etc. I personally hate to see good homes turned down because of lack of a yard but I do understand that if there are two folks who seem like equally good families why some breeders and/or rescues would pick the fence. My advice is to be prepared to address the question with care and thoughtfulness. And again, and I know this is hard, remember "patience is a virtue . . . ."
    Phyllis in West Virginia USA with two Clumbers and a Cavalier Named Buddy

  3. #3
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    Breeders are allowed to have their own criteria when homing their pets. If I have 20 homes to pick from -- 6 are local-- 2 have fences-- I am likely to home the pup with the local home with a fence. Now if there was a superior home without a fence-- I would home the pup there. I've only homed 2 pups without a fence. One lives locally in a town that doesn't allow fences. I did a home check and they convinced me that they had the time to properly housetrain the pup. The other home is in downtown Chicago-- again to someone who is home 90% of the day.

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    I don't have a fence, but I walk Lucky a lot and have a dog walker who gives him a walk during the day when I'm at work. It's certainly possible to have a Cavalier without a fence. I know of a lot of people who do.

    That said, it really does take an extra level of dedication because you need to go out in the bitter cold too with the dog during the winter and also on days when you don't really feel good But you can make it work ... you just need to find the right dog and the right breeder. It will happen for you, I'm sure. Just try to be patient.

    Lani
    (a.k.a. Lucky's & Sparky's mom!)

  5. #5
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    Sandy, Phyllis, & Lani. Granted your argument makes good common sense.

    So what about the 1% individuals that are home all day long with no companionship except themselves? Or maybe a retiree or fulltime housewife with a home and no fence.
    Last edited by pinkpuppy; 13th September 2007 at 07:42 PM.

  6. #6
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    Grrrr.... I am finding a older now not a pup and the owner is a showing her dogs, but this one was a disappointment. She just said no fence no dog and hung up on me. What's more important breeder first or pup first???

  7. #7
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    Wink

    That's a real shame but I have to say at least you are on tract to finding a breeder who cares. I know how hard you are working at getting a good puppy from a good breeder and you are soaking up all the good advice you are getting. All credit to you. You're going to make a great owner Hang in there. Won't be long hopefully.
    ....
    Dylan, Poppy & Kipling's
    *''' ' "*Mummy`` "*'
    ,'*" "*'

  8. #8
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    But, I care more importantly! I didn't just chose a Cavalier because it's cute even though is the icing on the cake. I know I would be out at all hours of the night the 1st year not to mention 3 feet of snow and rain half the time!

    I am starting to really resent now! Too much land, NO SHOPPING, now NO fur companions??? *sniff* and *crying* Home 24 hours a day alone behind a stupid computer!
    Last edited by pinkpuppy; 13th September 2007 at 07:43 PM.

  9. #9
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    Well, I can;t comment on your personal situation -- that is between you and your husband.

    But I do think breeders have the right to be as picky as they choose in homing dogs. They are their dogs, they put enormous care and money into breeding, and they want a home that fits their own criteria. This can vary widely but many have a strict policy in areas like fenced gardens, working homes, and/or young children.

    I know as a rescue I have criteria that upset many who apply to me for cavaliers (probably half of applicants will not be considered for a dog; primarily those planning to leave the dog in agarden during the day and a shed or run day or night ). I do not however, think fences/gardens are an issue and for most Europeans this requirement would mean the vast majority of dogs would never get homes. Yet I'd argue most dogs living in apartments in France, Germany, wherever in Europe, have a very high quality of life superior to what many living in homes with fenced gardens would EVER have. A person can travel throughout Europe with dogs and bring them to MOST hotels (outside of Ireland and the UK!), many restaurants, most public locations -- and they are far more a part of day to day life than those left to amuse themselves in gardens. Many will routinely get a midday walk, and a morning and evening walk.

    My requirement is rather for people to show me 1) that a landlord will ALLOW a dog and 2) that they have firm plans in place for caring for the dog when at work. I am much pickier about point 2 when working homes apply, and about placing dogs in home with children under 5. But I fully reserve the right to be as picky as I like about placing my rescues as diligently as a good breeder places his/her puppies.

    Hence: it DOES take time to find the right match and in the US waiting a year or more is not unusual. There's no point in arguing that a breeder's homing standards are unfair -- they are his/her 'products' with incredible time, money and heart and soul invested in each one, and they have every right to make decisions on what suits their particular standards for homing. They do differ however.

    PS I should add that I have three dogs and four cats living in an all-indoor environment as I have only a small side yard (about the size of a large American bathroom!!) and no garden. I happily home to apartment dwellers under the criteria noted above. I would be more cautious about unfenced yards where there is traffic -- I'd want a serious talk with the person but it wouldn't be an issue necessarily. Keep looking; you will find the right dog and person.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  10. #10
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    aloha, please hang tight, YOUR pup is out there he/she just needs to find you. I live in hawaii and it was a real pain to find a dog, it took well over a year for me to finially find one. I would have loved to rescue but we really don't have any rescue cav's on my island and rarely on the others. I couldn't bring a pup or dog to the island without it meeting some very strict standards that pretty much nixed that idea, not to mention it would be a long airplane ride in cargo. there was a tri male on petfinders that was there for months and months on end. I was so sad everytime I pulled it up and it was still there, most rescue groups not only want you to have a fence, they want you to live within a certian radius of them. that really put it out of the question for me. I did write a post about this rescue tri wishing I could apply for him on another board. several members then contacted the person taking care of him and she was really most unhelpful. I knew I didn't have a shot, put the people that called to ask about this little man were discouraged at how this lady was. I guess what I am saying is that some do put on overly hard rules for their animals, but you will find a good dog it just seems to take forever. just keep seeking out breeders you will find one. hang tight.

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