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Thread: hernia or not?

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  1. #1
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    Default hernia or not?

    I am thinking about purchasing a new puppy, the breeder actually let me take her to my vet as I was concerned about a hernia. My vet said it was not a hernia, but her vet thought it was. When pushed on you can't push it in, it just feels like a small fatty lump, not squishy, but not hard either. I am looking to purchase this puppy as a breeding bitch. Should I err on the side of the hernia and not purchase or take the chance and purchase her. I am leaning towards the not purchase even though she is otherwise an excellent candidate for showing and breeding! Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

  2. #2
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    Wouldnt know if its a hernia or not, but if ur not sure on the dogs health why on earth are u thinking of breeding her. There is lots of threads on this site giving good info on why not to breed from them unless u have all the health certs and all the checks done on these guys. Do u know all her family history going back generations. I had a dog Sam prob from a puppy mill or BYB and more than likely because none of these checks were done Sam died at 8 of heart problems. If u could have witnessed what both Sam and my family went through u would not even consider this unless u get proper advice.
    Sorry if i seem harsh but after what we and poor Sam went through i really feel strongly about this.

  3. #3
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    Even if you get a healthy bitch, from good lines, there are still many many pitfalls in breeding. Even experienced breeders can have huge difficulties, sometimes (eg emergency caesars, abhorted puppies, sickly puppies), so breeding for one's own sake and that of the breed, is best left to the experts. The breed has so many problems that will require much knowledge to be overcome.
    Barbara, Monty, Joly and Teddy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoky View Post
    When pushed on you can't push it in, it just feels like a small fatty lump, not squishy, but not hard either.
    That sounds like a hernia Ok. It's perfectly harmless, and can be removed with a simple operation, if I'm not mistaken.
    stephenlynn.co.uk/ruby/

  5. #5
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    If it is a hernia they are usually really simple to fix, Heidi had hers done when she was spayed, they are more cosmetic than anything.

    I may be wrong but i have always been under the impression that you should never breed from a dog that has/had a hernia due to health implications and the likelyhood is that the pups will get hernias to

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoky View Post
    I am thinking about purchasing a new puppy, the breeder actually let me take her to my vet as I was concerned about a hernia. My vet said it was not a hernia, but her vet thought it was. When pushed on you can't push it in, it just feels like a small fatty lump, not squishy, but not hard either. I am looking to purchase this puppy as a breeding bitch. Should I err on the side of the hernia and not purchase or take the chance and purchase her. I am leaning towards the not purchase even though she is otherwise an excellent candidate for showing and breeding! Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
    Please don't be put off! My dog has one and we went through the very same thing, wondering whether to pull out of purchasing him.

    It was 'medium sized' at 9 weeks, but it DID NOT grow with him and is absolutely tiny now (he's 15 months). The vet said it's not worth operating on it now unless we decide to get him castrated so it can be pushed in at the same time.

    It's not uncommon and usually quite harmless.

  7. #7
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    I like the quote "If in doubt, don't!" Is this the same puppy that was unwell earlier... the one you suspect came from a puppy mill?

    What are your reasons for wanting to breed?
    ~ Sam, Sonny & Beau ~

  8. #8
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    If you are concerned about whether a hernia is a risk for breeding a dog, then you definitely are too early in the learning process -- about dogs, breeding and cavaliers in particular -- to be considering breeding cavaliers. Breeding is infinitely more complex than this especially in this breed with its very high rates of affectedness with mitral valve disease and syringomyelia.

    But there are other problems with the fact that you have made this post.

    One of the main rules on this site is 'no breeding advice' for reasons that are very clearly stated in the Getting Started section. However, as you know, I also sent you quite a long private post regarding your FIRST puppy. I explained that the reason you'd been unable to obtain a show/breeding dog from any of the good breeders you approached, and why you sadly ended up dealing with a trash breeder and a convicted felon, is that NO reputable breeder would ever sell anyone a puppy for showing and breeding, unless the person has proven their capabilities and serious intention to put health foremost, knows the breed, understands the genetics of breeding and this breed in particular (as both the key health issues are polygenetic and inheritence is complex), and can breed only to BETTER the breed, not place more pressure on it.

    As others have said, there is a lot of good advice on how to get PROPERLY involved with the breed and also, in the Library section, the serious things you should consider before breeding in a general sense. If you care about the breed, much less about the families that might take your puppies, you will take the time to do so, get a proper breeder mentor who also shows, and can help pass on so much valuable direct advice to you.

    I am really disheartened though that none of what I said before registered, and that to the contrary, you have even posted again noting your intention to breed. The reason I took the time to respond privately was to offer some support in a discouraging situation for you and suggest some possible legal recourse, as well as to talk a bit about why responsible breeding is so very necessary.

    I sincerely hope you someday do come to love and cherish this breed as so many of us do here -- because when you TRULY do, you will be horrified you ever even considered breeding in this casual way and won't be approaching breeding in the way that you are now.

    At this time I don't feel you are ready to make contributions to this community so am suspending your account.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

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