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  1. #1
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    Default Testicles!

    Hi all I am looking for some advice, as we have 2 entire boys can anyone tell me what I am looking for in terms of testicular cancer etc?
    Proud to be owned by Ashton and Rio

  2. #2
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    What do you mean? Level of incidence, or what to look for to see if they have it? A vet check annually is the best way to check.

    Prostate risk:

    Prostate enlargement occurs in 60% of intact males over age 5 meaning they may require a neuter anyway. Early neuter is less stressful on a dog, especially an elderly dog which is when such enlargements often become a serious problem.

    Cancer risk:

    Cancer Risks in Cats and Dogs

    By Theresa A. Fuess, Ph.D.
    Information Specialist
    University of Illinois
    College of Veterinary Medicine


    "Most people are familiar with environmental risk factors for cancer in people," notes Dr.
    Barbara E. Kitchell, oncologist and veterinarian at the University of Illinois Veterinary
    Medicine Teaching Hospital at Urbana. "Pet owners should also be aware of the risk
    factors for cancer in their pets."

    Spaying and neutering can reduce the risk of cancer. Dogs spayed before the first heat
    cycle have only half the risk of mammary carcinoma of those spayed after the first but
    before the second heat cycle. Dogs spayed after the fifth heat cycle or never spayed have
    the highest risk of mammary cancer. Testicular carcinomas or tumors in dogs are common,
    but having your dog neutered eliminates that risk. Fortunately, testicular cancer rarely
    spreads in dogs, unlike in human beings, so treatment has a high success rate.
    From: http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/petcolumns/s...cle.cfm?id=136

    Also:

    What are testicular tumors?
    Testicular tumors are considered one of the most common tumors in older intact male dogs. The overall incidence in dogs is not very high because most dogs dogs are castrated (neutered) at a young age. The three most common types of testicular tumors are Sertoli cell tumors, interstitial (Leydig) cell tumors, and seminomas. About one third of dogs that develop a tumor will have more that one of these types of tumors present. Other types of testicular tumors (i.e. embryonal carcinoma, lipoma, fibroma, hemangioma, chondroma, teratoma) can occur, but are rare.
    The current cause of testicular tumor development is unknown. Although they are most common in intact older male dog (>10 years), they can occur in intact males of any age and breed. Male dogs that have one or both testicles that have not descended from the belly cavity are much more likely to develop a tumor than dogs with normal (scrotal) testicles.
    From: http://www.michvet.com/library/oncol...lar_tumors.asp
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  3. #3
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    Many Thanks for those links Karlin, now bookmarked for future reference!
    Cathryn
    Cavaliers leave pawprints in your heart and hair on everything else!!
    RE-LIVE YOUR CHILDHOOD THROUGH YOUR KIDS, THE TOYS ARE SO MUCH BETTER THESE DAYS!!

  4. #4
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    Not sure if this is what you mean but you can check them the same way a man would check, feel for changes, lumps or hardening, your dog won't mind! I wouldn't leave it as long as a once a year by a vet but do that too.
    ....
    Dylan, Poppy & Kipling's
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    ,'*" "*'

  5. #5
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    One of my dogs had a tumor which released female hormone & made one testicle shrink , so it felt like he had two small & a normal one.

    the person we got him from said he was neutered & as he had the typical fluffy neutered coat I assumed what she had said was true & didnt check , it was the vet who noticed it

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AT View Post
    One of my dogs had a tumor which released female hormone & made one testicle shrink , so it felt like he had two small & a normal one.

    the person we got him from said he was neutered & as he had the typical fluffy neutered coat I assumed what she had said was true & didnt check , it was the vet who noticed it
    OMG!! :
    Cathryn
    Cavaliers leave pawprints in your heart and hair on everything else!!
    RE-LIVE YOUR CHILDHOOD THROUGH YOUR KIDS, THE TOYS ARE SO MUCH BETTER THESE DAYS!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cathryn View Post
    OMG!! :
    I have to point out it was only a couple of days until it was spotted & he stayed at my sisters the first few days so I didnt get much chance to look at him. I would have noticed eventually honest ,lol
    The other dog & bitch that came with him really were neutered.

    why she said he was done I dont know , perhaps she forgot who she'd had done & who she hadn't. she apparently had 30 + dogs stuffed into cages in a flat ( hence my boy being agrophobic )

    the vet said they almost never spread so we didnt have a biopsy done . he lived for 4 years after that with no ill effects from the tumor
    Last edited by AT; 15th March 2008 at 09:05 PM.

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