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Thread: Heidi has been diagnosed with Pyometria

  1. #1
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    Default Heidi has been diagnosed with Pyometria

    Heidi has been diagnosed with pyometria . She's nearly 5 . I have been terrified to have her spayed as I lost my Ruby when she was given a pre med before surgery .
    Now it looks like I have no choice .
    Any help and advice you can give would be much appreciated .
    I'm distraught and sobbing as I write this .
    mimi
    Mum to Heidi ( Tri-female ) Nifa (Blenheim female ) & Rua ( Ruby male )
    & Cavalier Angel Ruby ( Blenheim female ) at the Bridge

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    Hi Mimi,
    Sorry to hear Heidi has this. Basically all you can do now is place her in the hands of your vet,and do exactly as he/she instructs.
    Of course you're distraght, I know how awful it feels when it's even a minor illness but try to be strong and keep a clear head and get her treatment under way asap.
    Please let us know how she's doing or when she's scheduled for surgery.
    Sins

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    I am so sorry, Maria.

    I will be blunt: she MUST be spayed immediately or is likely to die. The longer you wait the more likely she will not live. I cannot say this strongly enough!!! Pyometra is almost always fatal without swift action. She may also suffer grave damage to other organs in her body if this is not addressed IMMEDIATELY.

    Cavaliers are at no higher risk than any other breed during surgery. Please do not risk losing your dog to this.

    The risk of an adverse reaction to anaesthesia is tiny -- less than a fraction of one per cent. The risk of pyometra in unspayed cavaliers according to one Swedish study is OVER 40 %!!! Any female cavalier left unspayed has a SIGNIFICANT risk of this condition -- leaving her to battle it without removing that pus-filled womb risks her dying. Please get her immediately to a vet willing to act right away. We will all be thinking of her and you. I am sorry to be so graphic but please, please get her the help she needs.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

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    Pyometra and the surgery:

    WHAT IS A PYOMETRA?

    The word “pyometra” is derived from latin “pyo” meaning pus and “metra” meaning uterus. The pyometra is an abscessed, pus-filled infected uterus. Toxins and bacteria leak across the uterine walls and into the bloodstream causing life-threatening toxic effects, Without treatment death is inevitable.


    WHAT MIGHT MAKE THE VET SUSPECT THIS INFECTION?

    Classically, the patient is an older female dog. (Pyometra can occur in the cat but its not nearly as common.) Usually, she has finished a heat cycle in the previousl 1-2 months. She has a poor appetite and may be vomiting or drinking an excessive amount of water. In the more usual “open pyometra” the cervix is open and the purulent uterine contents is able to drip out thus a smelly vaginal discharge is usually apparent.

    There is also a form of pyometra called a “closed pyometra” where the cervix is closed. In these cases, there is no vaginal discharge and the clinical presentation is more difficult to diagnose. These patients also tend to be sicker than those with open pyometra due to retention of the toxic uterine contents.

    Lab work shows a pattern typical of widespread infection which is often helpful in narrowing down the diagnosis. Radiographs may show a gigantic distended uterus though sometimes this is not obvious and ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis.

    HOW DOES THIS INFECTION COME ABOUT?

    With each heat cycle, the uterine lining engorges in preparation for pregnancy. Eventually, some tissue engorgement becomes excessive or persistent (a condition called “cystic endometrial hyperplasia”). This lush glandular tissue is ripe for infectionf (recall that while thei inside of the uterus is sterile, the vagina below is normally loaded with bacteria.). Bacteria ascend from the vagina and the uterus becomes infected and ultimately pus filled.

    WHAT IS THE USUAL TREATMENT?

    The usual treatment for pyometra is surgical removal of the uterus and ovaries. It is crucial that the infected uterine contents do not spill and that no excess hemorrhage occurs. The surgery is challenging especially if the patient is toxic. Antibiotics are given at the time of surgery and may or may not be continued after the uterus is removed. Pain relievers are often needed post-operatively. A few days of hospitalization are typically needed after the surgery is performed.

    It is especially important that the ovaries be removed to remove future hormonal influence from any small stumps of uterus that might be left behind. If any ovary is left, the patient will continue to experience heat cycles and be vulnerable to recurrence.

    While this surgery amounts to the same end result as routine spaying, there is nothing routine about a pyometra spay. As noted, the surgery is challenging and the patient is in a life-threatening situation. For these reasons, the pyometra spay typically costs five to ten times as much as a routine spay.

    PROS:

    The infected uterus is resolved rapidly (in an hour or two of surgery). No possibility of disease recurrence.

    CONS:

    Surgery must be performed on a patient that could be unstable.

    IS THERE AN ALTERNATIVE TO SURGERY?

    In the late 1980’s another treatment protocol became available that might be able to spare a valuable animal’s reproductive capacity. Here, special hormones called “prostaglandins” are given as injections to cause the uterus to contract and expel its pus. A week or so of hospitalization is necessary and some cramping discomfort is often experienced. The treatment takes place over the course of a week. This form of treatment is not an option in the event of a “closed” pyometra as described above.

    PROS:

    There is a possibilityof future pregnancy for the patient (though often there is too much uterine scarring). Surgery can be avoided in a patient with concurrent problems that pose extra anesthetic risk

    CONS:

    Pyometra can recur. The disease is resolved more slowly (over a week or so). There is a possibility of uterine rupture with the contractions. This would cause peritonitis and escalates the life-threatening nature of the disease.

    PREVENTION

    Spaying represents complete prevention for this condition. Spaying cannot be over-emphasized. Often an owner plans to breed their pet or is undecided, time passes, and then they fear she is too old to be spayed. The female dog or cat can benefit from spaying at any age. The best approach is to figure that pyometra will eventually occur if the female pet is left unspayed; any perceived risks of surgery are very much out-weighed by the risk of pyometra.
    http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_pyometra.html
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

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    Heidi is being operated on tonight or first thing in the morning . She has been diagnosed early he has said , but I'm upset as she's the same age as Ruby when she died . I would never not go ahead with the surgery , I know the risks of Pyometria . I'm just terrified my beautiful baby wont make it through the surgery . I also have Nifa to worry about she's almost the same age and also not spayed . I'm blaming myself being selfish , not wanting to loose them to surgery like Ruby . Ruby had a weak heart , but Heidi and Nifa's hearts are strong . Need lots of positive thoughts and prayers to get us through this .
    mimi
    Mum to Heidi ( Tri-female ) Nifa (Blenheim female ) & Rua ( Ruby male )
    & Cavalier Angel Ruby ( Blenheim female ) at the Bridge

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    Mimi,
    Hugs to you. You can't help but worry about your baby, especially with the loss of your ruby, but try to think of the real odds of everything turning out just fine. I know that seems impossible for your now. Having something awful happen when the odds of it happening are really slim is so difficult and can leave you paranoid (I know, I have been there) in otherwise safe situations.

    Once her surgery is behind her, you won't have to fool with messy heat cycles or the risk of pyometria ever again!

    I'll be thinking about you tomorrow.

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    Heidi is in surgery now .
    mimi
    Mum to Heidi ( Tri-female ) Nifa (Blenheim female ) & Rua ( Ruby male )
    & Cavalier Angel Ruby ( Blenheim female ) at the Bridge

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi View Post
    Heidi is in surgery now .
    mimi
    Mimi is in my thoughts and prayers.

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    The same here -- all doglets hoping too that she comes through and is back snuggling with you in days. Cavalier prayers are the most powerful you know!
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  10. #10
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    Lots of prayers going up for little Heidi. I am sure she will recover quickly and feel so much better really soon!

    Karlin, thank you for the information on this condition. I am learning so much more each day I log in. I always thought pyrometria was just a urinary tract infection. I had no idea that the uterus was what was infected. We let Dottie go through one heat, on the request of her breeder, but I am so thankful that she has now been spayed. Not sure that I would have waited even one cycle had I been aware of this. Does it ever occur in puppies or very young intact dogs?
    Marianne
    Mom to Dottie, and our precious rescue, Claire-Bear

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