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Thread: Spinach in Dog Food

  1. #1
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    Default Spinach in Dog Food

    My cavalier likes to eat grass. The vet said something about putting cooked spinach in with the dog's food which should keep her from eating the grass? Any thought on this? Or maybe it was for another reason???

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    This is the first time I've heard of it, and it sounds like a great idea to me!

    Let us know how it works for you.

    I'm going to try it on my three. I'm thinking I'll use chopped cooked spinach.
    Cathy Moon
    India(tri-F) Geordie(blen-M)Chocolate(b&t-F)Charlie(at the bridge)

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    I also leave some catgrass around -- you can buy those little tubs -- mine occasionally like it (and the cats do too). Spinach sounds like a good idea though.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

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    I've never heard that before but it is interesting advice.

    Lucky likes to eat the grass too but he doesn't digest it and it always gives him a bit of diarrhea whenever he has it.
    Lani
    (a.k.a. Lucky's & Sparky's mom!)

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    Might try that with Barney, he likes to eat grass.

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    Default Spinach

    For anyone who reads the Dog World there has been a coloumn written for many years by Jane Lilley who has filing cabinets full of help and advice that she has kept for decades. Spinach is reguarly mentioned for itchy dogs and she and many others swear by it, it is always given raw and liquidised.
    HollyDolly

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    What a weird veg,i hate the stuff.Mind you its full of iron and goodness.Popye loved it.

  8. #8
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    I love it! But it isn't high in iron as many think.

    From Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinach

    "Popeye The Sailor man has a strong affinity for spinach, becoming much stronger after consuming it. This is partially due to the iron content being mistakenly reported ten times the actual value, a value that was rechecked during the 1930s, where it was revealed that the original German scientist had misplaced a decimal point in his calculations. In truth, spinach actually has about the same iron content as a lot of other vegetables, and even less than others. Cooked broccoli and cauliflower, for example, have almost double the iron content of spinach. "

    And it's hard to absorb the iron in spinach. From http://www.healthcastle.com/iron-spinach.shtml
    Spinach - a source of Iron

    Spinach is a source of non-heme iron, which is usually found in vegetable sources. Unlike heme iron found in animal products, non-heme iron is not as bioavailable to the body.
    According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, one cup of cooked spinach provides ~3.5mg of iron whereas a cup of raw spinach only contains 1 mg of iron.
    Spinach - also inhibits iron absorption

    Spinach also contains oxalic acid (sometimes referred as oxalate). Oxalic acid binds with iron, hence inhibiting its absorption.
    Spinach is not the only food containing high levels of oxalic acid. Whole grains such as buckwheat and amaranth, other vegetables such as chard and rhubarb, as well as beans and nuts all contain significant levels of oxalic acid.
    ....
    Dylan, Poppy & Kipling's
    *''' ' "*Mummy`` "*'
    ,'*" "*'

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    I asked hubbs how to spell popeye,thanks pauline,neither of us could spell it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justine View Post
    I asked hubbs how to spell popeye,thanks pauline,neither of us could spell it.
    I only knew because it was on Wikipedia. I'm not good at spelling.
    ....
    Dylan, Poppy & Kipling's
    *''' ' "*Mummy`` "*'
    ,'*" "*'

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