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Thread: My trainers TRAINED dog nipped my dog

  1. #1
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    Default My trainers TRAINED dog nipped my dog

    Yes you read it right, my trainers TRAINED dog nipped my dog - right on the nose. Then we were doing the dog-to-dog greeting for the CGC and the same dog lunged at my puppy, but did not make any contact. It has been a week since it happened and he was terrified in class tonight (needless to say we will not be going back)

    I have been taking him to the dog park and friends houses to meet other dogs trying to get him over his fear - but I don't know if its really doing any good. This has turned my charming, bubbly 9 month old puppy into a scared and shy dog.

    Any ideas as to what else I can do? I plan on trying to take him to a class somewhere else, but it might be a week or two before he can start.

  2. #2
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    Oh, how frustrating for you to have to deal with this problem. I am by no means an expert, but it might help if you get him around younger, smaller puppies first so there is no power struggle (the more submissive, and laid back personalities) and they are actually "sucking up" to him. Then slowly try to work your way back to adult dogs, sticking with dogs you know will be open and friendly with him.
    Good luck!

  3. #3
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    I think what you're doing is right. Try not to feel anxious when you visit these other dogs as he'll pick up on that.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by *Pauline* View Post
    Try not to feel anxious when you visit these other dogs as he'll pick up on that.
    I agree, if you are feeling nervous, he will too. When ever you are dealing with dogs, you always need to remember that even TRAINED dogs may react differently then you expect. Many adult dogs do not like puppies and will react negatively. I have a dog like that. I generally do not allow him to come close to puppies. When I do, I have him 100% under control (ie. in my arms). My dog has never nipped another dog and I plan to keep it that way. I am working on correcting his reactiveness, but I will always have to be vigilant with him. If your trainer's dog doesn't like puppies, she should have known better than to do "meet and greet" with a puppy. It may have just been a fluke however.

    Take your puppy to places with dogs that he has met before and give him lots of tasty treats when he sees another dog and doesn't act nervous. You don't need to get face to face to start. Just get in visual range. Stay within his comfort zone. You can get closer and closer, little by little. Be really upbeat in your praise. He will eventually realize that other dogs are not a threat.

    J.
    Last edited by Jay; 25th October 2008 at 05:35 PM.
    J. and pups, Gem, Monty, Harley and Sapphire

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay View Post
    I agree, if you are feeling nervous, he will too. When ever you are dealing with dogs, you always need to remember that even TRAINED dogs may react differently then you expect. Many adult dogs do not like puppies and will react negatively. I have a dog like that. I generally do not allow him to come close to puppies. When I do, I have him 100% under control (ie. in my arms). My dog has never nipped another dog and I plan to keep it that way. I am working on correcting his reactiveness, but I will always have to be vigilant with him. If your trainer's dog doesn't like puppies, she should have known better than to do "meet and greet" with a puppy. It may have just been a fluke however.

    Take your puppy to places with dogs that he has met before and give him lots of tasty treats when he sees another dog and doesn't act nervous. You don't need to get face to face to start. Just get in visual range. Stay within his comfort zone. You can get closer and closer, little by little. Be really upbeat in your praise. He will eventually realize that other dogs are not a threat.

    J.

    We have already done what you suggested above and he seems to be back to normal. Funny thing is now that I have mentioned this incident to a few of her other students it turns out I am not the only one this has happened to. It seems the 6 other people it had happened to also thought it was a fluke - but now that we all talked none of us are going back.

    I heard that in the next class her dog tried to go after a 2 year old German Shepard - I think her dog just has some issues!!!

    But thanks for your help, we have been out an about and we even went to a humane society fundraiser and he seemed completely back to his bouncy puppy self!

  6. #6
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    If the trainer is certified by any organisation, I would report this to the organisation. If they teach for a group or club, I would as a group, report this to the group or club. And I would call the local SPCA/humane society for advice -- by any measure this would be an aggressive dog and is not being adequately controlled by an owner who is to the contrary,actively allowing it to behave like this and as a result, potentially screwing up other dogs and making THEM reactive. Sadly anyone can call themselves a dog trainer and a lot of fools think they know what they are doing. I would make clear to the trainer why you have left the class.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
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  7. #7
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    Glad to hear that your puppy is doing better now. I think you are making a wise decision to find a different trainer. If the dog has nipped at other dogs before, she should know better then to put other dogs in a situation such as that. Some trainers are better than others and we should use our gut feelings and leave when something isn't right. I think Karlin is right, if your ex-trainer has been certified by an organization, I would definitely report the incidents.

    J.
    J. and pups, Gem, Monty, Harley and Sapphire

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karlin View Post
    If the trainer is certified by any organisation, I would report this to the organisation. If they teach for a group or club, I would as a group, report this to the group or club. And I would call the local SPCA/humane society for advice -- by any measure this would be an aggressive dog and is not being adequately controlled by an owner who is to the contrary,actively allowing it to behave like this and as a result, potentially screwing up other dogs and making THEM reactive. Sadly anyone can call themselves a dog trainer and a lot of fools think they know what they are doing. I would make clear to the trainer why you have left the class.
    This person is a CPDT - I have considered contacting them but at the time I thought it was just me. I spoke with my MILs trainer who is also a CPDT and she was appalled by what happened, so I am still considering what to do. Thanks for the advice!

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