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Thread: size at 7 months

  1. #1
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    Default size at 7 months

    I am a little concerned about Star, over the Christmas weekend I had the chance to let her see 2 of her littermates, her brother is easily twice her size, and her sister is a good 2 inches bigger and probably 3-4 lbs heavier. Star is small, not sure her height exactly, but she's a little chubby right now and weighs just under 10 lbs. Am I worried for nothing, or is this likely a sign that something is wrong? Amber isn't a big cavalier, and she's still quite a bit smaller then her.....I wasn't to concerned since she's my first cav baby, and I figured she was still growing at this age, but now seeing her siblings I'm getting worried.....
    Mommy to Amber (B/T female born 09/2003 ) and Starlight (Tri female born 05/2008 )
    Also owned by 2 Italian Greyhounds, 2 Afghans, 3 Sphynx Cats, and 1 Ragdoll cat
    Missing Brandy (Rough Collie), Anabelle (Toy Poodle), and my other furkids across the bridge

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    well i also have a minature Cav, and have pretty much learned that they come in all shapes and sizes... Bailey is now 9 and a half month old and weighs under 4kg - (about 8 and 1/2 pounds). My mum has two cav's who are 6 weeks and 1 day older than Bailey and one of them is nearly twice her weight! Although sh looks minature, i am told by the vet she is a perfect weigth for her skeletal size.

    Bailey has been ill a lot which seems to have stunted her growth, and the vets don't think she will grown much more so looks like i will have a puppy for life! The big thing is not to worry too much, if your vet is happy and she appears healthy and fit in herself then how big she is isn;t a great deal to worry about. just enjoy having a little one for longer!
    Emily with her furry monsters
    Cariad (Ruby) Jan 2009 & Lily (Westie) May 2007

    Gone but never forgotten... Baby Bailey (Blenheim) 10th April 2008~25.02.09

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    Ilsa is 4 yrs and weighs about 5.5 kilo, she's the smallest full grown cavalier I've ever seen (she was the runt.) Other cavalier owners think she's still a puppy - she's easily half their size on the street. I think some dogs, as some people are just small, if she's healthy and eating well I wouldn't worry.

    Jen and Ilsa

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    I understand cavaliers can be different sizes, but is that much difference normal in one litter? Both her littermates also have a lot more coat then her, although we do live in a warmer area then them, so that might be part of why....She eats good but hasn't seemed to be growing like I expected.....
    Mommy to Amber (B/T female born 09/2003 ) and Starlight (Tri female born 05/2008 )
    Also owned by 2 Italian Greyhounds, 2 Afghans, 3 Sphynx Cats, and 1 Ragdoll cat
    Missing Brandy (Rough Collie), Anabelle (Toy Poodle), and my other furkids across the bridge

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    There can be huge differences in size between littermates. Just like with human siblings. I know of a 30+ lb Cavalier who has a littermate who's at breed standard.

    I would not worry unless she appears ill or malnurished. She may fill out and grow some more too. Lucky was close to full size at 7 months.
    Lani
    (a.k.a. Lucky's & Sparky's mom!)

  6. #6
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    My girl is on the smaller side for a cavalier,her breeder rang me when she was about six months to ask about her size as her sister was remaining small as well.Basically the vet put my mind at ease and decided she was a "thriving pup" as she was healthy and active.
    Even at the age of almost 2, people are still remarking on how she's maturing and filling out, so just give her some time and she'll fill into a very nice little cavalier.
    The biggest I've seen is a large boy who measures 18 inches to shoulder and the smallest was Cecily's Dora who's a beautiful little healthy bundle, maybe 11 ins to shoulder??
    Sins

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    Quote Originally Posted by CavyMom View Post
    I understand cavaliers can be different sizes, but is that much difference normal in one litter? Both her littermates also have a lot more coat then her, although we do live in a warmer area then them, so that might be part of why....She eats good but hasn't seemed to be growing like I expected.....

    Maddie was the smallest in her litter. One of her sisters is about her size (11 " at the withers if she's stood up tall ) but the other sister is inches taller, and there was that noticeable difference at 3 months old between the 3 of them. I certainly wouldn't compare her to her brother - boys do tend to be bigger than girls. In my (limited) experience boys have a lot more coat as well. Something to do with trying to attract the ladies I think. As long as she's eating ok, is healthy, lively and doing everything a puppy her age should be I wouldn't worry.

  8. #8
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    Default My Amber at 7 months...

    My Amber is roughly 15 pounds at 7 1/2 months old. I kinda hope she stays this size, but breeder expects her to be about 20 pounds as an adult (based on other offspring from this pair). Her mother is definately NOT breed standard at 35 pounds and dad is about 20.
    What you mentioned about her coat not being full matches our experience, and we also live in a warm climate (north Texas). She has a very healthy, shiny coat... just not much of it, yet! Her slippers are just now coming in and I had to trim a bunch off of one of her feet because she got into some gum on the ground.
    I agree with the others... if she's eating well and vet gives her a clean bill of health, I wouldn't worry.

    Melissa

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    As a general point leading out of this discussion (and not directly related to the question!), it is really, really important to stress (and for people who care about this breed to understand!) that there is no such thing is a 'miniature cavalier' or 'teacup cavalier' and breeding undersized cavaliers deliberately directly impacts their health -- and NOT in a good way!! Miniaturising is known already to carry some health risks for some breeds and deliberately breeding extra small cavaliers -- a sure sign of the worst possible type of trash breeder -- is an absolutely appalling activity and ranks up there in my mind with knowingly breeding dogs with heart murmurs, syringomyelia, dry eye or any other affliction that involves pain and suffering int his breed. There are very often health reasons why dogs are very undersized, ranging from serious disease to malformed systems to neurological problems to being the run of the litter -- and for those trash breeders selecting for smallness it is inevitable that they are selecting for POOR HEALTH as well. Of course they DO NOT CARE -- they only want to charge more for their 'teacup' dogs and won;t have been doing anything to safeguard health in the first place.

    Cavaliers really should not come in all shapes and sizes at all except within a limited scale -- there is a breed standard, and the vast majority of cavaliers should fall within those weight limits or around them (more often they are larger which almost certainly has fewer possible health problems than undersized dogs). A few will naturally fall below them too of course, but this is less usual and certainly should not be a goal of breeding. In a couple of years of doing breed rescue I have had only ONE cavalier that I have directly dealt with fall below the breed standard (many above, but usually not more than a couple of pounds at most). Just NB I am NOT saying all undersized cavaliers have more health issues; I am saying that all else being equal, undersized dogs are far more likely to be small because of a visible or hidden health issue and there are direct knock on problems related to breeding undersized dogs; whereas this is generally not true of larger, oversized dogs.

    A female cavalier that is 10lbs at 7 months is possibly undersized or maybe just on the low end of breed standard or slow growing... and while that isn't necessarily an issue at all (and she will still add a little more weight and I'd guess will come in at the bottom of the breed standard, maybe 13 lbs) if siblings are considerably larger I'd definitely want to talk to my vet just to make sure there are no problems. Litters generally tend to end up pretty close to the same size (though there are always exceptions) so it would just make me a little concerned, enough to want to follow a dog's progress and talk to a vet. If she was meant to be a show dog, however, there will be issues -- her small size now will likely mean you have a dog too small to be shown or perhaps that will be seen as really not solid enough, and that probably should not be bred if she stays way down in size. If I bought such a dog as a show prospect I'd be back talking to the breeder about the situation. I think most show breeders would acknowledge very small cavaliers downat the bottom of thebreed standard don't tend to show well and are not seen as solid enough.

    If you live in a warmer climate that may well affect coat but a 7 month old generally doesn't have much coat anyway.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karlin View Post
    it is really, really important to stress (and for people who care about this breed to understand!) that there is no such thing is a 'miniature cavalier' or 'teacup cavalier' and breeding undersized cavaliers deliberately directly impacts their health -- and NOT in a good way!!
    Can i just clarify, (as i used the word minature) that when i was buying a puppy i didn't want a minature dog. Unfortunately the breeder waan't the greatest (but put on a very good show). Bailey has been ill from day 1 and is extremely small for her age (hence the use of theword minature). I wouldn't swap her for anything, but am well aware that she is far more likely to be at risk from health probs as that is all we have dealt with over the last 9 months. I certainly didn;t, nor never would instigate buying a 'minature' or 'teacup' cav, unfortuunately, i have a poorly pup who hasn;t grown, but i love her all the same.

    Just wanted to explain my situation
    Emily with her furry monsters
    Cariad (Ruby) Jan 2009 & Lily (Westie) May 2007

    Gone but never forgotten... Baby Bailey (Blenheim) 10th April 2008~25.02.09

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