Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Question about SM--Abbey just diagnosed-long post

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    740
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Question about SM--Abbey just diagnosed-long post

    As many of you know my dear Abbey was diagnosed--I knew it already though-on thursday. She started her meds of gabapentin 50 mg/ml and omeprazole friday night since she stayed the night there and we had consult and brought her back home on friday. Friday night was bad--she was very uncomfortable the whole night with scratching, licking etc. Last night she did better. I noticed last night before we went to bed that the drugs must have been starting to get into her bloodstream as she looked drugged. Also, George had called yesterday to Auburn, AL where we took her and said no change and they said to give it until monday as it took awhile to see any change. She had her first dose of medicine for today at 5 a.m. and I took her back to bed with us and she did go back to sleep--didn't seem like it took that long for the medicine to start working. So far this morning she's not scratching and rubbing head and licking paws like she does. Before the diagnosis it was sooo bad--not continuous but ALOT. I know they sometimes change the meds etc. or dosage etc. Should Abbey be appearing to be drugged? Is it a sign that her dosage needs to be lowered. I think I'd take the drug look anyday over the scratching, licking etc. although I sure don't want a drugged dog.

    She is on:

    gabapentin 50 mg/ml 1 1/2 ml 3 every 8 hours (3 x day)
    omeprazone 5 mg--once daily

    The gabapentin they gave us is liquid form which I have done a search on the net and its impossible to find--only have found one place. I think they gave us liquid maybe to find out the correct dosage.

    We are also almost 100% sure we are doing the surgery. I know of the pain etc. but both my husband and I feel we don't have much choice. Its progressive--so far her motor skills aren't effected. Only a matter of time. I know there are no guarantees but we have to try. We did take her to Auburn U where Dr. Axlund did the study a couple years ago so we feel we're getting very very good care and with people very knowledgeable about this. With any surgery there is pain. I've watched videos and have had one phone conversation with a person on here that did have the surgery for their dog.

    I'm probably rambling right now but its been a rough week.
    Linda, Georgia, USA
    Winston--shih tzu-male, Darby female tri, Bentley male blenheim and Chelsea, black-tan
    Abbey my beloved tri who is so embedded in my heart--RIP Sweet Princess

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm so glad the medication is working for Abbey! I've been doing my independent test with Ilsa and I think it takes about 45 minutes to hit. I give it to her when I wake up and usually she's ok in time for our walk.

    I'm proud of you for making a decision about the surgery! I'm 3 months after diagnosis and still can't decide, though I'm leaning towards it. Please take care. I haven't had surgery so I can't help you in that department but if you just need to talk PM or e-mail me and I'd be happy to call you anytime. I've also done extensive research on surgeons and think I've made a good choice.

    I live in Paris but have free international so I think it's best if I call you.

    Take care

    Jen and Ilsa

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Irish, living in England
    Posts
    279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Linda,

    It is good that Abbey is having treatment at last. It sounds like she is more comfortable anyway.

    I think surgery is only done as a last resort isn't it? Like when there isn't anything else to be done.

    Maybe it is different in the US.

    I can understand that you will want to do everything you can to keep her with you, but the greatest love of all is when you can let go to save her suffering.

    What guarantees are there that surgery will cure the condition? There is a lot to be considered and I would take it a step at a time with whoever is responsible for Abbey's welfare regards medication, surgery etc.

    Take care
    Mary

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Rayleigh, Southend-On-Sea, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Dylan seemed really drugged up at first but he got used to it. We even upped the dose after 3 weeks. I'd say Abbey is on a really low dose. Dylan isn't very symptomatic but he is on 200mg Gabapentin which I split into 3 doses a day.
    ....
    Dylan, Poppy & Kipling's
    *''' ' "*Mummy`` "*'
    ,'*" "*'

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    740
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    ok let me try to explain to all how my husband and I feel and why we are doing the surgery.

    There is NO cure for this as we all know. Surgery is NOT a cure. What it does hopefully is stop the progression. Thats it. There are also no guarantees that it will even do that. They have had 80% success rate and they are doing it differently in Auburn, AL. This is where Dr. Axlund was and did his study a few years ago so I believe she is in very good hands. I AM not doing this for my sake. I am doing this to give her a chance. I can't sit and mask her symptoms and then one day she can't go up the stairs and one day she falls over or has seizures all the time etc. Hopefully, this works and keeps that from happening. If it doesn't then all I can say is that we gave it our da-- est. I remember years ago when I was having trouble in my marriage and I almost walked away and at that time was about 25 years into it and a friend said to me--don't your kids deserve to hear that you gave it your da mn est and get into counseling and then be able to say yep I tried. Well, this is kind of like that for us---we did what we could. If after surgery we are in the same boat and she is like she is now. Then we will opt to probably take her out of this misery and for my mother to be at the gates to hold her. I know she was diagnosed just a few days ago but in my heart I've known that she has had it. If you were at my house and witnessed it after researching it then you wouldn't have had any doubt either.
    Linda, Georgia, USA
    Winston--shih tzu-male, Darby female tri, Bentley male blenheim and Chelsea, black-tan
    Abbey my beloved tri who is so embedded in my heart--RIP Sweet Princess

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    773
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just a couple of comments.

    There is a lot going on behind the scenes here. The program at Auburn appears to be excellent, led by a very capable neurologist. They are using some new techniques - I haven't seen this info posted on any of the SM sites so will follow up to get info to the right people. I am very interested because I live in the same area as Linda and I want to stay informed of options in our geographical location. Linda has identified people who have had surgery done for their dogs and are now four years post surgery so she has those resources.

    Remember that Abbey has been diagnosed late rather than early, and her symptoms have progressed over the years. She is already five years old. She has been misdiagnosed for years now. That means that Linda doesn't have the luxury of watchful waiting as do those who got early diagnosis for their Cavaliers. Time is truly of the essence here.

    Linda and her husband are smart and loving, and I have confidence that they will make the right decisions for their particular situation. Remember that each situation is unique and we all do the very best that we can.

    Pat
    Atlanta, GA
    Pat B
    Atlanta, GA

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Linda,

    I felt just as you did when my Ruby had surgery last July. In my opinion, it gave her the best chance at a less painful and happy life as she was not even 3 years old at the time. We are now 7 months post op, and although our results haven't been exactly what we hoped for, I am trying to be optimistic that Ruby will continue to heal. As I'm sure you've been told, it's a very long recovery (Ruby is still recovering), but the good news is that her decompression looks excellent, so hopefully this horrible condition will not progress. That is the main reason I did the surgery, because it is progressive and I did not want Ruby to get any worse. You are the only one who can decide what is best for you...I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have about the surgery and recovery. Ruby had the titanium mesh decompression...I'm not sure if that is the same technique as you are considering.

    All the best,
    Michelle & Ruby
    Massachusetts

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    732
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Linda,

    I think that is wonderful that Abbey has such loving owners who would go through the anxiety, expense, and effort to have surgery for her. I don't question your decision in the slightest. If it's her best chance, then I would do it in a heartbeat! I volunteer at the animal shelter where 10 year old, 13 year old, etc. purebred dogs are just dropped off at the shelter or dumped at the side of the road because they are just too much trouble or expense. I just want to take all these trusting, confused lttle dogs home with me. They have no idea why they are in the scary place they ended up. So Abbey is very blessed in this way, even in the face of this horrible problem.

    I will pray that the surgery is a success. Thank you for posting the information about her doctor, too. It is good to know the name of a good surgeon within driving distance of Tennessee, in case Daisy ever needs it. She has done a couple little things lately that have scared me, SM-wise. I'm trying not to panic, but it's always in the back of my mind.

    The breeders who refuse to do testing for fear that their lines will be shown as tainted with SM should be reading about your experiences so they recognize the pain that is being spread through their denial of the problem.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •