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Thread: How cavalier research benefits other dogs and humans

  1. #11
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    Default How Cavalier Research Benefits other Dogs and Humans

    Eddy ,

    Thanks for Post, but I'm a wee bit lost, will this Research help in finding the MVD Gene.

    Bet(Hargreaves)

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bet View Post
    Thanks for Post, but I'm a wee bit lost, will this Research help in finding the MVD Gene.
    The Research Abstract mentioned expression of the SRCR GENES (SERCA2α, PLN, and HAX-1) and this in relation to Mitral Valvular Insufficiency. Bet one could call Mitral Valve Disease (MVD) by some other names which could include Chronic Mitral Valvular Insufficiency Disease. Also note the word GENES in the Abstract.

    Any research information about the heart and the diseases associated with it might be of help in finding the genes for heart diseases including Mitral Valve Disease.

    By the way, the Abstract mentions "23 small breed dogs with CMVI classified by severity" and I wonder if they were Cavaliers.
    .

  3. #13
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    Think this is quite exciting

    <H2>Cardiac Research at Colorado State University Shows Diseased Heart Valves in Dogs Produce Serotonin

    FORT COLLINS - A significant part of the question of what causes mitral valve disease in dogs, giving scientists and medical experts clues into new possible ways to treat or prevent the disease, may have been solved by a Colorado State University veterinarian. The discovery refutes the current believe that mitral valve disease, the top heart disease in dogs, is inevitable as a part of aging in pets.
    Dr. Chris Orton, a cardiac surgeon at Colorado State's Veterinary Teaching Hospital, has been investigating the role of serotonin in heart valve disease in dogs. It has been known for some time that drugs that enhance serotonin production in humans -- such as appetite suppressants, migraine medications and antidepressants -- cause drug-induced heart valve disease. It turns out that naturally occurring heart valve disease, known as degenerative myxomatous heart valve disease, is virtually identical in dogs and humans. Dr. Orton's group has discovered that cells in diseased heart valves of both dogs and humans produce serotonin locally, and this may be driving the disease process.
    "Serotonin is made in the brain and in cells in the gut. We previously thought that those were the only places it was made before it is circulated in the blood," Orton said. "But we found the local creation of serotonin in diseased heart valves. We think that drug-induced and naturally occurring heart valve disease share the same mechanism for creating the disease - the production of serotonin. The valve is making serotonin, which causes its own disease. Serotonin is directly linked to pathologic changes in the valve, which cause the malfunction of the mitral valve."
    Orton's group is working to discover what triggers the enzyme in the valve that makes serotonin, and he would like to launch a clinical trial on dogs to look at the impact of a drug that inhibits the enzyme that produces serotonin in the heart.
    Mitral valve disease impacts the mitral valve, one of two valves on the left side of the heart. In degenerative valve disease, the valve becomes deformed and begins to leak. Serotonin is made in the gut by an enzyme called TPH1, Serotonin then goes into the blood stream where it is picked up by platelets which are involved in blood clotting. Orton's group has shown that TPH1 is present in high levels in abnormal mitral valves from both dogs and humans.
    "Like all diseases, mitral valve disease is mediated by cells," Orton said. "If we can understand the mechanism in cells that triggers the disease, we can slow, treat or prevent the disease process in new ways."
    Mitral valve disease, also often called mitral valve prolapse in humans, tends to impact smaller breed dogs and usually develops when they are middle aged or older. Chihuahua, King Charles spaniels, and other toy and small breeds of dog tend to develop the disease more often than other breeds. Of the dogs that develop heart disease, 40 percent develop mitral valve disease, and the disease is the eventual cause of about 70 percent of all heart failure in dogs.
    Orton heads up Project CARE at Colorado State. The project focuses on researching the causes of and development of new treatments for mitral valve disease in dogs. The project is supported through grass roots funding. To learn more about the program or to support the research, visit http://csuvets.colostate.edu/heartce...vd/index.shtml.
    </H2>

    http://www.news.colostate.edu/Release/4712
    frecklesmom
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  4. #14
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    Default Diseased Heart Valves in Dogs Produce Serotonin

    That is quite exciting.

    Cavaliers have heart valve disease that is hereditary which has been passed on to them by genes from their parents, and the genes cause the diseased heart valves which then produce Serotonin and this in turn drives or contributes to the diseased heart valves becoming worse.

    However this research may lead to specific drugs being developed to limit the production of Serotonin within the diseased heart valves. This could be of great value in relation to treatment of MVD and where such specific drugs would have to be taken for the rest of their lives and that I think could be quite expensive over many years. BUT note that specific drugs will NOT address the actual cause which is faulty genes producing diseased heart valves which are being passed on through the generations and still will be.

    I think we really should focus on finding the genes so that we can breed dogs that do not have heart valve disease that is hereditary, then we will have dogs that do NOT produce Serotonin at the heart valves that these researchers are talking about.
    .

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    There may be more than one cause to MVD but even finding one possible is achievement. From there one searches for the gene causing the serotonin to flow and if there is excess in certain breeds looking at their genes. If no excess, than studying sensitivity predisposition of those breeds to serotonin and the genes causing the predisposition. Piling on meds is only a bandaid and a poor one at that. Cures are found in eradicating the cause and with all the brilliant scientists working at this there will be an answer. Until the answer, and after the answer, careful breeding will still be paramount.
    frecklesmom
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  6. #16
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    Default How Cavalier Research Benefits other Dogs and Humans.

    The more you read of this new Research Report ,the more there is food for thought.

    Take the mention of Platelets,it is a fact that some Cavaliers have large Platelets, and they have to be counted manually.

    A team of Researchers at Auburn University mentioned that they could have found a Possible Link between Oversized Platelets and MVD in Cavaliers.

    Other Researchers also mention Serum Serotonin Concentration is elevated in CKCS,this was carried out at the University of Pennsylvania.

    The team said that initial Research was showing that CKCS have higher levels of Serotonin than other Breeds which are Predisposed to to MVD ,that because of the results ,it is suggested that 5-HT ,may play a role in the development of Dengerative MVD in small Breeds and in particular CKCS ,that further studies involving the relationship between 5-HT ,DMVD,Breed and Platelet Number ,morphology ,and function are warrented.

    Dr Orton 's Group said that they think that drug -induced and naturally occurring Heart Valve Disease share the same mechanism for creating the Disease, the Production of Serotonion

    More mention of Platelets,in DMVD,the Heart Valve becomes deformed and begins to leak

    Serotonion,is made in the Gut by an Enzyme called TPHI,Serotonion then goes into the Blood Stream where it is picked up by Platelets

    Whether some Cavaliers with Larger Platelets have a part to play in this ,I don't know.

    Has any-body else any thoughts about this. ?

    Bet(Hargreaves)

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    BUT note that specific drugs will NOT address the actual cause which is faulty genes producing diseased heart valves which are being passed on through the generations and still will be.

    I think we really should focus on finding the genes so that we can breed dogs that do not have heart valve disease that is hereditary, then we will have dogs that do NOT produce Serotonin at the heart valves that these researchers are talking about.
    .
    Well precisely. That is why I laughed when one breeder posted this article across several lists, implying this discovery was somehow a vindication of how breeders breed (which at this time, for most, whether club or BYB or puppymill, seems to include either ignoring the MVD protocol entirely or only using the bits that seem useful and always owning several dogs that need to be the exceptions to the rule). I must say her posts only confirmed how some breeder's thought processes are so self-serving that they can invent and believe the most twisted logic.

    However, the positive side is that this was such a perfect example of why individual breeders cannot be trusted to self-regulate that it, along with so many other discussions and individual posts and email exchanges, has been submitted to the formal groups considering whether legislation is needed to oversee dog breeding practice.

    Public lists and boards are extremely helpful in producing this type of commentary directly from certain breeders themselves, which often stands in stark contrast to the formal submissions the breeders, breed clubs and national kennel clubs make to such bodies. The internet is so very useful!
    Karlin
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  8. #18
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    Default How Cavalier Research Benefits other Dogs and Humans

    I am sorry if I gave the impression that the answer to the MVD Problem in our Breed is the Research findings about Serotonin,

    Unfortunately I was one of those Kids, whose two words were

    BUT WHY !!!! Drove my Mum Mad !

    I never thought for a minute thought that some Cavalier Breeders would use the information as an excuse for not Health Checking their Cavaliers for MVD .

    Just thought that if Serotonion had a part to play in the MVD Problem then the Cavaliers could maybe benefit,I think that those Cavaliers being involved with the effects of Sertonion must some-how be Genetically Susceptible to how Sertonion is there.

    I have got so much stick from a good number of Cavalier Breeders for saying for years , don't Breed from a Cavalier who has a Heart Problem .

    I have written to the 2 Committees with my views about this ,that will Mandatory Health Testing be the answer to the serious Health Problems SM and MVD afflicting the Cavalier Breed to-day. Got word back ,my views had been noted.

    Is Serotonion another part of the Jig Saw in the fight against MVD in Cavaliers,who knows but it may even be involved in Genetically Susceptible Cavaliers with Vaccinations. ?

    It's a fact that Platelets drop because of the Parvo Part in the Combined Vaccine, Platelets have been mentioned in the Serotonion Research, and some Cavaliers are known to have Large Platelets, all this are just my thoughts, BUT NO EXCUSE for Cavalier Breeders not be Health Testing for MVD in their Breeding Stock.

    Bet(Hargreaves)

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