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Thread: Juvenile Renal Dysplasia {previously Suppressed immune system}

  1. #1
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    Default Juvenile Renal Dysplasia {previously Suppressed immune system}

    While Reuben was away being neutered today, the vet rung to say that they had found ulcers under his tongue and she wanted to test one under a microscope and take a blood test as he might have a suppressed immune system.

    We had saved up for a few months in a jar to get the 75 for the neutering, and then the blood test and ulcer test was to cost another 186!!


    Luckily he is insured, so we paid the first 81 and the insurance pay the rest.

    Has anyone had a dog with a suppressed immune system before? She seems to think it may have something to do with him being underweight.
    Last edited by Janice; 19th December 2009 at 02:29 PM.

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    Yes!! Believe it or not I have a friend who just had this happen a while back with her girl. She was doing an odd mouth movement and took her to the vet (I went with her). It was really weird. The vet opened up her mouth and pointed out two ulcers on the roof of her mouth. This is what they call it
    Eosinophilic Granuloma
    And this is what they said about it

    She has spontanious collection of cells which form ulcers. She will probably get them for the rest of her life.
    She was put on prednisone (short term) and it is considered genetic.

    Hope this helps.
    Cathy
    Loving mom to Jake, Shelby and Micah

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    I am running to a meeting and just have a moment, but google canine eosinophilic stomatitis - this is a less common genetic malady in Cavaliers - and is associated with a suppressed immune system. It is actually more common in cats than in dogs. These ulcers are generally found in the throat.

    If you go to Cavalier Connection message board and do a search you will find several threads there discussing this condition as we've had several members whose Cavaliers have had this.

    There are links posted there and I've typed verbatim there from vet textbooks. I can copy and paste later tonight if you can't find these threads on that site.

    Pat
    Pat B
    Atlanta, GA

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    I copied and pasted what I wrote in the past on another board:



    There is very little in the literature about this disease - it is much more common in cats than in dogs. Notice that it isn't even listed on cavalierhealth.org This is also found in Maltese.

    There are a few paragraphs and a drug chart in Ettinger's Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine. I can scan this material tomorrow at work (my scanner is broken) and email to you if you send me your email address - patbeman@comcast.net Corticosteroid drugs are used along with some antibiotics and antifungal drugs.

    Did you see this abstract -

    http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi...2002.tb00026.x

    Journal of Small Animal Practice
    Volume 43 Issue 12 Page 533-538, December 2002

    To cite this article: A. J. German, D. J. Holden, E. J. Hall, M. J. Day (2002) Eosinophilic diseases in two Cavalier King Charles spaniels
    Journal of Small Animal Practice 43 (12) , 533538 doi:10.1111/j.1748-5827.2002.tb00026.x


    Prev Article Next Article
    Abstract
    Eosinophilic diseases in two Cavalier King Charles spaniels
    A. J. German11Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU1, D. J. Holden11Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU, E. J. Hall11Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU and M. J. Day**Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU1Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU *Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Bristol, Langford House, Bristol BS40 5DU
    1A. J. German's current address is Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L7 7EX

    Abstract
    This report describes the clinical presentation of two Cavalier King Charles spaniels with different eosinophilic diseases. The first case presented with dyspnoea and a non-productive cough, and investigations demonstrated eosinophilic bronchopneumonopathy. The second dog was referred for the investigation of haemorrhagic vomiting and diarrhoea and was eventually diagnosed with eosinophilic enteritis. Both dogs had concurrent eosinophilic stomatitis, and both responded completely to immunosuppressive glucocorticoid therapy. This report is the first to describe the concurrence of eosinophilic stomatitis and systemic eosinophilic disease in Cavalier King Charles spaniels, and suggest that this breed may be predisposed to eosinophilic syndromes.
    --------------------------

    Here's more

    http://www.dentalvet.com/vets/oral_ulcerations.htm

    Breed Predilections - Ulcerative eosinophilic stomatitis affecting three Cavalier King Charles spaniels have been described. The lesions are similar in gross appearance to palatine eosinophilic granulomas, but histologically they lack granuloma formation. Maltese are prone to oral ulceration caused by periodontal disease.

    ------------------
    Here's another:

    PubMed Citation
    Articles by Joffe, D.
    Articles by Allen, A.

    Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, Vol 31, Issue 1, 34-37
    Copyright 1995 by American Animal Hospital Association


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Articles

    Ulcerative eosinophilic stomatitis in three Cavalier King Charles spaniels
    DJ Joffe and AL Allen


    Ulcerative eosinophilic stomatitis affecting three Cavalier King Charles spaniels is described. The lesions are similar in gross appearance to previously reported palatine eosinophilic granulomas, but histologically they lack granuloma formation. The cause of the lesions is not known. Treatment with corticosteroids led to the resolution of one case and partial resolution of a second. A third case resolved spontaneously without therapy.



    Pat
    Pat B
    Atlanta, GA

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    Found something else that I posted in May of 2004 that I'll cut and paste below. Since I now have newer vet texts, I'll take a look tonight and see if I can find more current info:
    ----------------------------------------------------

    I have done some research, and there is very little info in most of the veterinary texts about canine stomatitis. There is a lot of info about feline stomatitis as it is linked with some common feline immune mediated diseases, esp. FIV.

    I couldn't find anything about canine stomatitis in several editions of Kirk's Current Veterinary Therapy. In Ettinger's "Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine" there is some brief info, including:

    "Stomatitis is inflammation of the oral mucosa. Oral inflammatory lesions in dogs and cats have multiple causes, necessitating a consistent and logical diagnostic approach. A complete history and thorough physical examination are essential. Oral ulcerations occur in at least four different immune mediated diseases.......etc.......The many infectious diseases that are manifested by lesions in the oral cavity include......etc..." "Candidiasis (which is yeast) may cause severe stomatitis in dogs and cats." "Stomatitis may be described as idiopathic (means they don't know the cause) despite a thorough diagnostic evaluation." Then they talk about the condition in Maltese dogs. Goes on to say "It is appropriate to assume that there may be an immune mediated component to idiopathic stomatitis following negative diagnostic testing. A prudent treatment plan includes regular teeth cleaning, oral preventive medicine at home, and intermittent or chronic provocative corticosteroid therapy. Antimicrobial therapy (they list drugs, including metronidazole) emphasizing anaerobic pathogens may be administered on an intermittent, chronic basis." There is some similar info in Merck's Veterinary Manual.
    ---------------------------
    0
    Pat B
    Atlanta, GA

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    My goodness... thanks Pat for all your info. However, reading all this has got me well confused!!!

    is it something which can kill him or something which will clear up with the proper medicine as a one off or short treatment? or is it a rest of the life medicinal thing?

    i know you cant say properly as we dont have the results yet.

    im just hoping he has an ulcer because he has an ulcer (just like i get them sometimes) and that he is slim because he is a fussy eater.

    Fingers crossed, I may know saturday night.

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    I'm not expert, but it sounds like something that will be treatable, but will continue to flair up now and again.

    He may not be a picky eater, eating might just be painful for him.

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    I don't know if it is anything like esosinophilic disorders in humans, but I have a condition known as eosinophilic esophagitis. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell so an eosinophilic disorder indicates that there is an abundance of eosinophils where they normally are not (in my case) or more than typical. In my condition, the eosinophils cause my esophagus to spasm and set up an inflammatory process that cuases food to get stuck.
    I have had to have food surgically removed from my esophagus more than three times. Kids with this disorder lose weight because they are afraid to eat. (No such luck with me!). The current thinking is that it is an immune mediated response like Pat said, caused my an allergic response to something. Maybe it is the same in dogs. Since it is a fairly uncommon disorder in cavaliers, I don't know if the scientists have examined allergic responses in relation to eosinophilic stomatitis. What I do know is that my condition is treatable with proton pump inhibitors (like protonix) and a steroid spray into my esophagus. We are also examining food allergies. It is not life threatening. Like Soushiruiuma said, maybe it is too painful to eat and Reuben is thin because he has had these ulcers periodically during his life. Good luck figuring it out.
    Bev
    Oliver (blenheim, born 3/2001), Riley (black & tan, born 8/2002,), Madison (ruby, born 9/2003), and Oz (tri-color, born 7/2007)

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    When Dylan was having his MRI scan done by Dr Clare Rusbridge she found he had 2 eosinophilic granulomas. She said it is a condition that cavaliers are prone to but that she hadn't seen a cavalier with it for some years. She said it may cause him to retch or cough and seem as if he has a sore throat but she didn't advise that he needed any treatment for it unless it becomes a problem. We have never noticed Dylan having any difficulties at all like this so far. He is extremely greedy and will eat anything in fact I struggle to keep his weight down! I tried to find some information about the condition but found hardly anything at all about it. I would be interested to know what your vet says about it Janice. Has Reuben shown any signs that the ulcers are causing him discomfort?
    Jane
    Harvey (B&T) - 03/10/04
    Dylan (Tri) - 05/05/05

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    [QUOTE=Cathy T;346910] She was doing an odd mouth movement and took her to the vet (I went with her).


    What sort of odd mouth movement? I was wondering what the signs are!
    Tania and The Three Cavaliers!
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