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Thread: Juvenile Renal Dysplasia {previously Suppressed immune system}

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane P View Post
    about it. I would be interested to know what your vet says about it Janice. Has Reuben shown any signs that the ulcers are causing him discomfort?
    He has never gagged or coughed at all.

    ALthough he is fussy, he WILL eat when he feels like it, hard food, soft food, chews all sorts, but not regularly.

    To be honest I rather hope it is something to do with him being thin and it can be resolved and he may put on a bit of weight.

    He is 12" high at the shoulder and 15" long down the back from shoulder to beginning of tail, but ony weighs 4.75kilos.

    I do get some looks when people stroke him as you can feel all his spine.

    i will certainly let you know what is said when the tests come back.

    He was sick today.. 24 hrs after eating some peices of chicken, they came up completely undigested, hope its to do with the anaesthetic and not the other thing.

  2. #12
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    Oh Janice,
    I hope Reuben is feeling better. I was thinking of him yesterday.
    I might see you tonight at "The pump" if we make it through all the snow.

    Give Reuben a hug from us anyway.

    Mel

  3. #13
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    Dont think we are going to make it Mel, he is shivering indoors and it is just SOOOO cold out there... and with my husband not home from work Id rather sit with Reuben if thats ok.

    Hope all goes well, I might open the front door and have a listen!!!

  4. #14
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    Just had some very bad news from the vet.

    She rung me to say that they have found very high levels of something in his blood and he has a bad kidney disease

    she said that he has to go in straight away tomorrow morning and stay in for 3 days while she flushes him out and does more tests and hopefully by monday they will see an improvement.

    But, she said, dont think all will definitely well as it is a bad thing and he is so young, that is why he is thin and has bad breath and he may not make it.

    All we can do is take him in and HOPE against hope he is ok.... he is only 10 months and he is the best dog we have ever had.

    Even my husband and 2 teenage sons were crying tonight.

    Please keep your fingers crossed and pray over the next few days, I have never felt quite this bad.

  5. #15
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    Janice- So sorry to hear this. I hope he gets better soon, keep us updated. Sending healing thoughts his way.
    Trisha in Southwest Florida
    Cavaliers: Casey, Ollie, & Winston and usually a foster or two! Cats: Pebbles & Benson

  6. #16
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    Oh, Janice, we all feel for you and your family and will hold little Reuben in our hearts especially tightly over the next few days. What a rotten thing to happen - and just before Christmas too.

    Do let us know how you all get on. Our thoughts will be with you and I'm sure everyone will send healing vibes
    Marie-Anne taken over by
    Hattie (Blenheim) Poppy (Blenheim) + Lucy (Shih-tzu)
    Louie, Joss, Peppa, Megan, Victoria all waiting patiently at the Bridge

  7. #17
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    Oh Janice Im sooo sorry about Reuben x

    He is such a sweet little thing and full of energy. You will be in all my prayers and please let us know how it all goes. It must be such a shock for you especially finding out all this when all you wanted was him neutered.
    But thank goodness you did get him done otherwise you would never know any different.


    Sending positive thoughts your way xx

    Karen

    Ruby - my stunning soul mate who defies the odds every day
    Charlie- my angel at heart and devil at play


  8. #18
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    I'm so sorry Janice. Thinking of you all and keeping everything crossed for little Reuben.
    Jane
    Harvey (B&T) - 03/10/04
    Dylan (Tri) - 05/05/05

  9. #19
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    Can you get the exact numbers for his creatinine, phosphorus and BUN? Those are the kidney values. At 10 months and since he has had "failure to thrive" this likely means that he has JRD - juvenile renal dysplasia. I've known a few Cavaliers to have this and a lot of shih tzu as it is common in the shih tzu breed. There is a genetic component in some breeds.

    The term "azotemia" means that the kidneys are not properly filtering out the waste products - this causes poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, general feeling "yucky." Kidney failure also causes anemia. Treatment includes:

    1. Hospitalization for IV flush to flush out the toxins. In the US, we give daily subcutaneous fluids (very easy, cheap and quick) to keep the blood kidney values down once out of the hospital. This is really the key to keeping a dog with kidney failure alive. Vets in the UK generally do not let clients do subq fluids at home - I have no idea why.

    2. Diet - diet needs to be very low in phosphorus but still with a good amount of bioavailable protein (good quality protein like egg whites) esp. for a growing puppy. Most of us with dogs in kidney failure home cook as there is not a good commercial diet available. Hill's KD and Royal Canin and Purina make commercial kidney diets but they are really inferior to home prepared kidney diets. Most vets push low protein and don't understand that it is low PHOSPHORUS that is needed and protein is not the enemy per se.

    3. Phosphorus binders are given with meals - generally aluminum hydroxide in capsules or liquid form - these bind to the phosphorus in the food eaten and it is carried out through the intestines (feces) without having the need for the kidneys to filter it out.

    4. Supportive care like pepcid 30 minutes before a meal to reduce acid stomach, anti-nausea drugs like Reglan, certain supplements like omega 3 fish oils and CoQ-10, and drugs that coat the stomach such as sucralfate (carafate) to prevent ulcers. B-vitamins can be given for anemia. Omega 3 fish oils absolutely help reduce creatinine (studies out there to prove this).

    5. For PLN (protein losing nephropathy) - dogs with JRD are often losing protein in their urine - sometimes ACE Inhibitors like benezapril or enalapril are given. These are the same drugs used for heart failure. They often help but they sometimes hurt so you must monitor effects with blood chemistry. The "old school" vet view is to reduce dietary protein with a PLN - the new vet research shows that protein should actually be increased (to help make up for the loss) as much as possible while still keeping low phosphorus. (I had a Maltese mix with a PLN kidney disease.)

    I had a geriatric Cavalier who developed chronic kidney failure, and I learned everything that I know about how to take care of him through a yahoo group - K9kidneydiet. Many vets, esp. in the UK, either do not know or do not share with clients many of the basic facts outlined above about how to keep a dog with kidney failure alive. Many vets basically give their clients a bag of KD food and send their patients home to die and they don't try daily fluids at home, etc. For some reason, many vets WILL let clients do subq fluids at home for CATS but not for dogs - I have no idea why. Most dogs are euthanized because they will not eat, lose weight, become anemic and lethargic, feel terrible, etc. so it becomes a quality of life issue. The key most of us find is to keep the kidney values down (which gives good quality of life) with the daily fluids - almost like a "poor man's dialysis." For humans, of course, dialysis is used rather than an IV or subq fluid flush. Even if the IV flush gets the numbers down, daily fluids at home are needed to KEEP the numbers from rising again.

    Below are links if you want to read the technical.

    http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proce...6602&O=Generic

    http://www.vetprof.com/clientinfo/juvenilerenal.html

    For anyone who wants to get serious about treating a dog with kidney failure, I cannot say enough good things about that yahoo group. What I learned there kept my dog alive and well compensated for a long time until he was euthanized for other reasons at 16 1/2. My GP vet and my cardiologist became believers when they saw what could be achieved and now send clients to me for information about home care.

    It is EXTREMELY overwhelming at first to learn about diet, fluids, etc., but it becomes a part of daily life once you understand the basics.

    As you can tell, I am passionate about this subject - this is because I have lived it and I know exactly how it is to feel powerless and hopeless. Above is a very basic primer - there is much more for anyone interested.

    Pat
    Pat B
    Atlanta, GA

  10. #20
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    Janice try not to get too upset. Now that your vet knows whats wrong with Reuben she can start helping him with it. Sending positive thoughts and healing vibes to you and Reuben.

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