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Thread: Lungworm From Eating Slugs and Snails

  1. #1
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    Default Lungworm From Eating Slugs and Snails

    Hello everyone. Not too long ago I saw a commercial on TV in regards to watching out so your dog doesn't eat any slugs or snails. Apparently this is very dangerous because they can get lungworm from them. That lungworm is pretty scary stuff! Now I just saw on Yahoo news this story:
    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20100513/...n-870a197.html

    Please watch out for your pets. I know Belle used to love crunching on snails when she was a pup and I never knew they were bad for her! Thank Providence that she has grown out of it. Now I just have to watch out for Bobby...

  2. #2
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    We get loads of slugs in the garden, and apparantly the lungworm can be picked up from dogs eating the grass with slime trails on or drinking from puddles with slime in. That's why I use Advocate on mine, rather than Stronghold or Frontline.

    As for that man - I hope he makes a speedy recovery, but I couldn't imagine ever eating a slug.

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    I had Des in the UCD vet hospital today for tests as my vet suspected a heart murmur, he has a slight murmur which is exaggerated at times of high stress...but they think he may have this virus also! I've never seen him eat slugs, I never even seen one in my garden! We are waiting on his blood results & they've to do a stool examination also..he is going on the treatment for it until they find out either way. I've never heard about this before & will be more watchful. Seemingly the average worming tablet doesn't protect the dogs from this worm, so I've asked the vet to recommend one that does, when she gives the name of it I'll post it up here.
    But thank god Des is going to be ok
    Lucille,

    Des, Penny, Bonnie, Zoe & Georgia

  4. #4
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    Advocate treats for them!! horrible things...I was in the vets with my cat today and there are posters about Lung Worms saying they're on the increase because of the warm damp weather we get now

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    kandis and frida were infected with lungworms when they were puppies. they caught it here, not with the breeder.
    there were hardly any symptoms at all, and frida came very close to dying!
    she was treted with Panacur for almost a year!! horrible....

    i submit faeces for testing every 3 months, and use Advocate during the summer, although one should not, really, to minimize the risk of immunity (the worms becoming immune).

    never let your dogs eat, or play with snails or slugs!

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    I'm another who uses Advocate on all the dogs as a matter of routine, as there are many slugs and snails to be found in the back garden where the dogs play and sometimes eat grass.

    The product also kills ear mites. Bubbles used to have them most of the time, now she is absolutely clear.

    Rebel had a large infestation of rabbit mites (walking dandruff) when I first used Advocate. I applied it and also used a skin scrub and antibacterial powder on the infected skin lesions, which 3 months later are almost gone. The squirrels which play in the garden may well have brought the mites in.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo & the ByFloSin Cavaliers
    Winston Alexander,Little Joe & Holly Poppet
    Birmingham, UK

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    I am definitely going to get my dogs some Advocate. Thanks for the info!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ByFloSin View Post
    I'm another who uses Advocate on all the dogs as a matter of routine, as there are many slugs and snails to be found in the back garden where the dogs play and sometimes eat grass.
    On investigating Advocate it only states Heart Worm, no mention of Lung Worm can you reassure?

    Nanette
    HollyDolly

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    Nanette, don't worry, it's the same thing...

    The lungworm Angiostrongylus vasorum (also known as French Heartworm) from

    www.lungworm.co.ukCynic that I am, I have noticed that since Bayer received the licence to market their product, we are suddenly hearing a lot more about lungworm...However if anyone would like a more holistic approach to prevention and treatment, www.gentletouchremedies.co.uk now have an homoeopathic nosode available.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicki View Post
    Nanette, don't worry, it's the same thing...

    The lungworm Angiostrongylus vasorum (also known as French Heartworm)
    Hi Nicki
    I am more than confused now, just been reading this:-


    Heartworm and lungworm in dogs and cats in the UK
    Alison Ridyard

    IN domestic carnivores, almost all parasitic diseases of the heart and lungs are caused by nematodes belonging to the Metastrongyloidea superfamily, which includes Angiostrongylus vasorum, Oslerus osleri, Filaroides species, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Crenosoma vulpis. The only exception is heartworm, which is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis. Metastrongyle infections are encountered throughout the UK, although certain geographical hot spots have been reported. While the incidence of disease associated with these parasites in dogs and cats is relatively low, largely due to the widespread use of prophylactic anthelmintics, there is anecdotal evidence that angiostrongylosis and Crenosoma infection, in particular, are on the increase. This may reflect the increasing urbanisation of the fox, which has the potential to act as a reservoir of infection. D immitis is not currently endemic in the UK and has been discussed in detail in a separate article on imported infectious diseases. This article reviews the metastrongyle infections of prime concern in this country and, for each parasite, discusses the diagnosis and management options.

    Nanette
    HollyDolly

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